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Thread: A handgun, shotgun, rifle that you have owned the longest......

  1. #21
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    Oct 2010
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    Southaven, MS
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    I've had this pre 64 winchester for 16 years, but I'm only 23. Came from my grandfather. I made the leather for it recently.

    -Rob

  2. #22
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    Jan 2012
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    NH Expat in Cincinnati
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eaglestroker View Post
    I've had this pre 64 winchester for 16 years, but I'm only 23. Came from my grandfather. I made the leather for it recently.


    Beautiful rifle. I love the Pre-64 Winchesters.
    Send lawyers, guns, and money.

  3. #23
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    Aug 2005
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    Texas
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    I have owned the same 9mm Glock since 1992. I only take it out to the range once a year.

  4. #24
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    Dec 2010
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    Somewhere
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    I have owned many guns in the last 15 or so years, somewhere around 40+, though rarely more than 10 at once.

    My very first was a Lee-Enfield No.4 Mk1, it still lives in the safe and rules the rest of the herd. 1941 production BSA Dispersal rifle, built during the Blitz, factory refurbished in 1944.

  5. #25

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    These two rifles, the Krag Jorgensen above and the Smith Corona Model 1903-A3 below were purchased at the same time in 1975.



    Acquired this Smith & Wesson Model 10 Heavy Barrel as a Christmas present to myself in December of 1975



    I don't still have my first couple of shotguns so this Harrington & Richardson Model 176 10 gauge Magnum has been kept the longest, acquired in 1976 after reading of Elmer Keith making 100 yard shots on ducks on the Salmon River. At 19 I burned up 4 boxes of shells before realizing I couldn't lead ducks or depend on the patterns at excessive ranges. The shotgun became a good choice for nighttime varmints brought in with a call and spotlighted.



    I don't still have my first .22 rifle, a Winchester Model 190 acquired in 1971. I wore it out, replaced the trigger group and wore it out a second time. I do still have the Benjamin Model 347 .177 pump air rifle I got as a kid in the late 1960s.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Charlotte NC
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    969

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    Remington 1100 that I bought in 1982.
    Mike

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    Remington Nylon 66, purchased new in 1970 for $25.

  8. #28
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    Nov 2011
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    Piedmont NC
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    I have a pre 64 Winchester lever action that will not come out of the safe except for it's once a month wipe-down. It's been around for a long, long time.
    I recently gave away a mint Ted Williams .22 I bought at Sears when I was 21 and am now 60. It needed a better home and I was just too anxious to keep throwing rounds threw it and could not stand the thought of it breaking down on me so I had to pass it off.
    Frank. Proud Member of the BOTOC. Harleys Rule 2014 Tri Glide Ultra.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    I have a 1921 German Luger (P-08) which was my first and only firearm for 10 years (I bought it when I turned 21)). I only take that one out to the range once or twice a year now with a friend at Christmas time but I have a 1918 Luger which I tend to use more often (once every month or two) and a WWI era Webley revolver, too.

    Here's a photo of my oldest handgun:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Michael

  10. #30
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    Feb 2011
    Location
    Waukesha, WI
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    I have an old Sears and Roebuck, 20 gauge shotgun my grandfather gave me when I was 8. I believe it's from the 1950s and I've taken a few ducks with it before I got my Benelli.
    -Scott

  11. #31
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    Jun 2008
    Location
    Central California
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    This is my Colt .357. Dad bought it new in 1954 and gave it to me in 1977 when I became LEO. Still locks up tight and shoots great.



  12. #32
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    Gentlemen, both very fine looking weapons there.
    Frank. Proud Member of the BOTOC. Harleys Rule 2014 Tri Glide Ultra.

  13. #33
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    Jul 2011
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    Southern California
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaeltheRomanHistorian View Post
    I have a 1921 German Luger (P-08) which was my first and only firearm for 10 years (I bought it when I turned 21)). I only take that one out to the range once or twice a year now with a friend at Christmas time but I have a 1918 Luger which I tend to use more often (once every month or two) and a WWI era Webley revolver, too.

    Here's a photo of my oldest handgun:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1010020.JPG 
Views:	76 
Size:	79.4 KB 
ID:	234929
    I was watching "Sons of Guns"..they had a show on these..but I think it was more about the Japanese ones..3 of em

  14. #34
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    Dec 2007
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    Over the rainbow
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    I have a Ruger MK I Target .22 pistol. I think I was 19 when I bought it, and at that time 18 years olds were legal adults. I am 52 now, so that's 33 years.
    BOTOC member

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by wksimple View Post
    This is my Colt .357. Dad bought it new in 1954 and gave it to me in 1977 when I became LEO. Still locks up tight and shoots great.


    That 4-inch Colt 3 5 7 is fully the equal to any Python in trigger pull and action smoothness and is better looking to boot in my opinion. Yours features the really neato fully checkered walnut stocks only used by Colt on their premium revolvers up to about 1960. Those stocks by themselves are worth a pretty penny. Though I have a Python I think its full-lugged barrel is ill-balanced and clumsy looking and the vent rib is over the top. The Royal Blue finish standard on the Python is a bit much as well, giving an over-polished and slightly "melted" look. The Python is reminiscent of the '59 Cadillac with it's over-the-top styling with the soaring tail fins and all the chrome. Of course I'd be tickled to drive a '59 Cadillac despite it's styling excesses. The 3 5 7 is my favorite of the Colt double action .357 Magnum revolvers though and is an uncommonly found Colt model. Very underrated as a shooter or as a collectible.

  16. #36
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    Jun 2008
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    Central California
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    Quote Originally Posted by noelekal View Post
    That 4-inch Colt 3 5 7 is fully the equal to any Python in trigger pull and action smoothness and is better looking to boot in my opinion. Yours features the really neato fully checkered walnut stocks only used by Colt on their premium revolvers up to about 1960. Those stocks by themselves are worth a pretty penny. Though I have a Python I think its full-lugged barrel is ill-balanced and clumsy looking and the vent rib is over the top. The Royal Blue finish standard on the Python is a bit much as well, giving an over-polished and slightly "melted" look. The Python is reminiscent of the '59 Cadillac with it's over-the-top styling with the soaring tail fins and all the chrome. Of course I'd be tickled to drive a '59 Cadillac despite it's styling excesses. The 3 5 7 is my favorite of the Colt double action .357 Magnum revolvers though and is an uncommonly found Colt model. Very underrated as a shooter or as a collectible.
    Here is the companion piece to the Colt 357: This is a Colt Officers Model Match in .22 LR that my dad purchased new in 1953. It is THE MOST used weapon in the stable. I cannot count the number of hours and rounds of .22 ammo that I have burned through it over the years. It is just plain fun to shoot!!


  17. #37

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    Oh man! Showing stuff like that here. Now I'm envious. That is one fine revolver right there! Thanks for putting up the photo of it. I'd love to have one and hope to trade into one some day before I'm too old to do any good with it at the range. It is a most excellent companion piece to the 3 5 7 and Colt would have been pleased to know that your family made the purchases. Has those great stocks on it as well. No one makes any revolvers now that approach the craftsmanship of the quality Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers of the era.

    I shoot more .22 in a revolver by far than all other centerfire revolver cartridges combined and you're right, it's big fun! I use a Smith & Wesson Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece, acquired new in 1980. It's the long-barreled version and accurate like a rifle though I doubt it can accomplish a thing in the accuracy department that your Colt Officer's Model Match can't do.

    I have a 1957 Colt Officer's Model Match .38 Special which of course is the center fire twin to your .22 Officer's Model Match. The external appearance is the same, only the chambering is different. It does slightly beat my Smith & Wesson Model 14 K-38 Masterpiece with the most carefully prepared target wadcutter handloads.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by noelekal View Post
    Oh man! Showing stuff like that here. Now I'm envious. That is one fine revolver right there! Thanks for putting up the photo of it. I'd love to have one and hope to trade into one some day before I'm too old to do any good with it at the range. It is a most excellent companion piece to the 3 5 7 and Colt would have been pleased to know that your family made the purchases. Has those great stocks on it as well. No one makes any revolvers now that approach the craftsmanship of the quality Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers of the era.

    I shoot more .22 in a revolver by far than all other centerfire revolver cartridges combined and you're right, it's big fun! I use a Smith & Wesson Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece, acquired new in 1980. It's the long-barreled version and accurate like a rifle though I doubt it can accomplish a thing in the accuracy department that your Colt Officer's Model Match can't do.

    I have a 1957 Colt Officer's Model Match .38 Special which of course is the center fire twin to your .22 Officer's Model Match. The external appearance is the same, only the chambering is different. It does slightly beat my Smith & Wesson Model 14 K-38 Masterpiece with the most carefully prepared target wadcutter handloads.


    +1. They don't make them like they used to. The Smith K38 is my second most used firearm. I cast 148 gr wadcutters and push them with 2.7 grains of Bullseye. That has been THE load for .38 Special for me since I started reloading in 1972. Can't beat it for accuracy and ease on the gun. ( I would however love to have a K22. Now I'm envious! )

  19. #39

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    I am always going to be jealous of the American gun laws, in Australia it is restrictive to the point of being an utter joke - yet it does nothing to stop the nightly shootings in Sydney.. funny that.

    On topic though, I've got a Winchestor 94 Cherokee edition that my old man bought, and passed on to me and I've still got it. It's a bit beat up and worse for wear, but even though I've sold all my other rifle I'll hold onto that forever.

  20. #40
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    Jun 2008
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    Central California
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatPipeGuy View Post
    I am always going to be jealous of the American gun laws, in Australia it is restrictive to the point of being an utter joke - yet it does nothing to stop the nightly shootings in Sydney.. funny that.

    On topic though, I've got a Winchestor 94 Cherokee edition that my old man bought, and passed on to me and I've still got it. It's a bit beat up and worse for wear, but even though I've sold all my other rifle I'll hold onto that forever.
    If there is a family connection, it's a 'keeper'. I have bought and sold literally hundreds of guns over the past 40 years, but anything that was Dad's is still with me and will someday go to my sons and daughters. It's what keeps us connected, like having the opportunity to shave with my Dad's '64 Superspeed every morning.

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