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Thread: Hydrosols?

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    Default Hydrosols?

    I had an interesting conversation with Charles at QED earlier. I tried a cream he was testing out and commented that I found it to be more drying to my skin than other products. We then discussed my post shave routine (sometime witch hazel, sometimes not - see my SOTDs I guess) and he recommended a hydrosol. Can I get a general discussion on these types of products - what they do, when you use them, benefits, what you like, waht you don't. You know, the usual...

    Dennis

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    Dennis:

    You might find THIS thread helpful. Others will likely chime in as well. I use them frequently before applying ASB but as well in the afternoons just as a pick-me-up.
    Jerry

    Tact is the art of making a point without making any enemy. Howard W. Newton

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    Hi Dennis,
    A true hydrosol is what remains after chilling the steam that is produced extracting essential oils. You have to verify your purchase of a hydrosol. Some vendors sell distilled water with a few drops of essential oil for fragrance. A true hydrosol has no added fragrance or anything else for that matter.

    You can use a hydrolsol in many ways..... as the aqua or water portion of lotions, after shaves and creams, etc. It's nice mixed with clays for a mask instead of plain water. Spritz some into your bath water or as a body spray or splash after a bath or shower. It is used also as a toner, spritzed on the face. It would be perfect on hot summer days as we now have. A hydrosol can be spritzed anywhere that is safe for sprays.

    Since hydrosols have no preservatives and the addiiton of a preservative would spoil it, hydrosols should be refridgerated to keep them fresh.

    I'm sure others have many more usage ideas.

    Sue

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    Thanks for the reply Sue - good information. Charles said that hydrosol works well after shaving as it does a good job of removing any remaining soap or cream residue - moreso than plain hot or cold water. Sounds like an interesting product and I do notice alot of fellows use it in their SOTD posts. I will add some when I place my next order. -- Dennis

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    Dennis,
    I am still projecting approximately two weeks until the various Hydrosols will be on my website. They will be pure distillate.
    Happy the info was helpful to you.
    Sue

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    I am a dedicated hydrosol user. Net: they feel nice, smell nice, are soothing to freshly shaven skin, but do nothing at all for moisturizing.
    -Scotto


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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotto
    I am a dedicated hydrosol user. Net: they feel nice, smell nice, are soothing to freshly shaven skin, but do nothing at all for moisturizing.
    At the risk of sounding picky, I must disagree. I have found that all of the hydrosols I have assist with moisturizing by increasing the rate of absorption of my balms, particularly during the warmer months.
    Best regards,
    Ron
    vita non est vivere sed valere vita est

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    Sue's post was very helpful. However, I am wondering if anyone can clarify what actually makes up a hydrosol? As in, what is in that steam that makes it spiffy? I would naturally assume it to be mostly water, but that fails to explain how it has any useful properties other than smelling good?

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    Quote Originally Posted by moses
    Sue's post was very helpful. However, I am wondering if anyone can clarify what actually makes up a hydrosol? As in, what is in that steam that makes it spiffy? I would naturally assume it to be mostly water, but that fails to explain how it has any useful properties other than smelling good?
    Hi Shane,
    Are you familiar with the concept of distillation? How different components of a liquid have different boiling points and can be extracted by taking advantage of this property? If you are familiar with this concept, read this post and you will hopefully gain the insight you desire.
    Best regards,
    Ron
    vita non est vivere sed valere vita est

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    Thanks Ron,

    I am pretty familiar with distilation. Even done it....

    So if I understood your post correctly, the scenting agent and water are heated, and the EO, having a lower BP than water, is distilled out. Then the remaining water that the rose petals or waterever are boiling in is the hydrosol. Is that a correct reading? Or is the hydrosol also a distillate, just at a different BP from the EO?

    Either way, I take it the Hydrosol is primarily water, but carrying other compounds extracted in the boiling process that have beneficial characteristics?

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    There are 2 ways of creating a hydrosol... Both use the distillation method..

    The first is after steam distilling your plants to create essential oils, the hydrosol and the essential oils are separated... Hydrosols are the left over water with some of the essential oil left over after the distillation process..

    I am also seeing more and more people who skip the essential oils and distill purely for hydrosols. It is still steam distillation but the end product is pure hydrosol instead of essential oils floating on the top of the hydrosol.. If you want more information on this, I can get it for you..

    I have to admit that hydrosols are nice and cooling.. and I know you guys are going to twitch, but they are wonderful for hot flashes.....

    I also keep a bunch in my fridge... they are wonderful and am thinking of adding to the website shortly.. hth.

    Hugs,

    Sue (Mama Bear)

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    Ah, thanks so much Sue - now I finally understand. It is a steam distillation process wherein the EO and a lot of steam are distilled off, and then the oil and water parts of the distillate are separated into EO (oil) and hydrosol (water). Cool. I am such a nerd....

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    Quote Originally Posted by moses
    Thanks Ron,

    I am pretty familiar with distilation. Even done it....

    So if I understood your post correctly, the scenting agent and water are heated, and the EO, having a lower BP than water, is distilled out. Then the remaining water that the rose petals or waterever are boiling in is the hydrosol. Is that a correct reading? Or is the hydrosol also a distillate, just at a different BP from the EO?

    Either way, I take it the Hydrosol is primarily water, but carrying other compounds extracted in the boiling process that have beneficial characteristics?
    By jove, I think you've got it.
    Best regards,
    Ron
    vita non est vivere sed valere vita est

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    Ron, I use hydrosols in the same way, i.e. to aid the balm's absporption. My statement referred to the use of hydrosol alone; they are of no real use as a moisturizer despite claims otherwise.
    -Scotto


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