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Thread: Help Joel

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    Default Help Joel

    I thought about a pm but figured some others might be interested.........While at specs today I decided to ask the sales guy about scotch and whisky, he recomended single malts and showed me to a few that I can not remember the name of. I know your knowledged when it comes to this subject and thought maybe you could help a brotha out. I could have swore I had seen a reveiw of some good ones by you with pics and all.

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    Well theoretically "scotch" and "whisky" are synonomous as the "whisky" spelling denotes Scotch. "WhiskEy" however encompasses Burbon, Canadian, Irish, etc - the only outlier I know of is Maker's Mark "whisky" which in fact is a bourbon. Bill Samuels Jr. calls it Whisky due to the companys English roots - and possibly to just be a bit ornery!

    If you are asking for some Scotch recommendations - I caution you about listening to the salesman.... they typically thump the "single malt" tune, and that tune only. Personally I feel some of the best Scotches are vatted - which is different from simply blending. You can read all about it at www.compassboxwhisky.com - Compass Box happens to make a remarkably wonderful whisky - I highly recommend. The Eulethera and Peat Monster are wonderfully peaty, smokey drinks (the Eulethera is my personal favorite). If you are not a big fan of peat - the smoothest scotch I have had the pleasure of enjoying is Compass Box "Asyla"

    Glenmorangie also makes an incredible Scotch - the Sherry cask, maderia, and port casks are wonderful - and quite reasonably priced for what they are. Macallan also makes wonderful scotches as well - however I personally feel they are a bit over priced.

    Bourbons are my real passion.... a good bourbon is liek a fine cognac - incredibly complex with a bounty of flavor. Rip Van Winkle 12 year reserve is an incredible experience, as is Bookers, Blantons (very potent), Woodford Reserve, etc.

    If you let me know more of what you are interested in trying - I can come up with a more specific recommendation. Do not shy away from Irish Whiskey either - Jameson, Bushmills, etc make the smoothest of whiskies out there and are great for beginners!

    (BTW, this is Joel Answering from Nicks computer, we are in the midst of filming some video clips and my face is getting punished take after take! YEAOCH!)

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    yea I was curious how many times you planned on shaving in one day while making the video....cant wait to see the finished product. Honestly my experience is Jack and Crown and damnit if those two are not horribly disgusting. Im wanting something I can drink neat and enjoy a good cigar with, trying to build up my bar collection and find what I like.

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    Single-malts are my thing, but everyone has different tastes among them. Start on the light side and work up. I'll second the recommendaton for Glenmorangie's offerings - they are great and not too expensive. Macallan is super-smooth but expensive, Talisker peppery, spicy, bold, and inexpensive. Perhaps you can find a bar near you that has a selection. That is how I started out.

    Happy drinking.
    -Scotto


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    Sean,
    If it is for a cigar, you want a robust whisky or bourbon. Dalmore Cigar Malt - is specially designed to be consumed with a cigar - and at about $35 or so, it is inexpensive for Scotch. As for bourbon's - I wouldn't go with anything too pricey - but a bottle of Rip Van Winkle 12, or 15 year will run around $38-45 and are magical with cigars. Another neat thing to try is the darkest, quality chocolate you can find - consumed with a cigar AND a good Scotch or Bourbon.... it is one hell of a regal experience, and they all mesh with one another beautifully. Scharffen Berger Limited Edition 72% "El Carmen" or their widely available 82% extra dark are both spectacular choices for chocolates.

    For cigars - Cognac is also wonderful.... a bottle of Remy Martin VSOP would do ya just fine. Personally - I prefer a nice hearty bourbon or Scotch.
    - Joel
    joel (at) badgerandblade.com

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    Hard to do better than Glenmorangie Port Wood Finish (single malt) with a cigar.
    -Scotto


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    Hands down, the best Scotch I've ever laid tastebuds on is Caol Ila. I can't describe it as it has been a while, but I've never seen a bottle of liquor disappear so quickly in a "non-party" atmosphere. At the time, it was hard to find in the States. I friend brought it back from the UK. A quick search tells me that it is now being distributed here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick
    Well theoretically "scotch" and "whisky" are synonomous as the "whisky" spelling denotes Scotch. "WhiskEy" however encompasses Burbon, Canadian, Irish, etc - the only outlier I know of is Maker's Mark "whisky" which in fact is a bourbon. Bill Samuels Jr. calls it Whisky due to the companys English roots - and possibly to just be a bit ornery!
    Bourbons are my real passion.... a good bourbon is liek a fine cognac - incredibly complex with a bounty of flavor. Rip Van Winkle 12 year reserve is an incredible experience, as is Bookers, Blantons (very potent), Woodford Reserve, etc.
    It has always been my understanding that only whiskeys from Bourbon County Kentucky are "Bourbon". Hence Jack Daniels is a whisky from Tenn! Also bourbons are divided into sour-mash and sweet mash types to make it more complicated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchll
    It has always been my understanding that only whiskeys from Bourbon County Kentucky are "Bourbon". Hence Jack Daniels is a whisky from Tenn! Also bourbons are divided into sour-mash and sweet mash types to make it more complicated.
    From my readings - Tennesse Whiskey is essentially bourbon - but made in Tenn. and filtered thru charcoal... there are actually several brands that label their whiskey with both "Tennesse" and "Bourbon" such as Evan Williams. Typically Tennesse whiskey refers to the whiskey being charcoal filtered.

    - Joel
    joel (at) badgerandblade.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchll
    It has always been my understanding that only whiskeys from Bourbon County Kentucky are "Bourbon". Hence Jack Daniels is a whisky from Tenn! Also bourbons are divided into sour-mash and sweet mash types to make it more complicated.
    Hi Mitchll!
    If I recall correctly, "JD" doesn't advertise as bourbon, but as Tennessee Sour Mash Whiskey. Haven't drunk it in years. Back in the mid to late '70s (1970's Ferman!) it was my swill of choice, especially the Green Label (less expensive than the ever-popular Black Label, but more flavorful). Mmmm, mmmm, GOOD!
    Best regards,
    Ron
    vita non est vivere sed valere vita est

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchll
    It has always been my understanding that only whiskeys from Bourbon County Kentucky are "Bourbon". Hence Jack Daniels is a whisky from Tenn! Also bourbons are divided into sour-mash and sweet mash types to make it more complicated.
    Actually, to the best of my recollection, there aren't any working distilleries in all of Bourbon County. Bourbon isn't like Champagne where there's a law dictating it come from a certain region... there is however a law stating Bourbon has to be US made, but that's the only regional restriction.

    -Nick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick
    Actually, to the best of my recollection, there aren't any working distilleries in all of Bourbon County. Bourbon isn't like Champagne where there's a law dictating it come from a certain region... there is however a law stating Bourbon has to be US made, but that's the only regional restriction.

    -Nick
    I wasn't sure after all these gentlemen responded so I did a little research:


    Excerpts from

    Spirits of Kentucky:
    Small-Batch and Single-Barrel Bourbons Revive the Good Old Days of Whiskey
    by Mark Vaughan

    This article is featured on the Bourbon History page

    As with French-appellation wines, there are strict laws governing just what a Bourbon must be to be labeled as such. For example, at least 51 percent of the grain used in making the whiskey must be corn (most distillers use 65 to 75 percent corn). Bourbon must be aged for a minimum of two years in new, white oak barrels that have been charred. Nothing can be added at bottling to enhance flavor, add sweetness or alter color. Though technically Bourbon can be made anywhere, Kentucky is the only state allowed to put its name on the bottle. And as Kentucky distillers are quick to point out, Bourbon is not Bourbon unless the label says so.

    ... As the name implies, a single-barrel Bourbon, of which there are precious few, is a whiskey actually taken and bottled from one barrel. Small-batch Bourbons are whiskeys from a "batch" of barrels that have been mixed or mingled, as the distillers say, prior to bottling. For a common brand, the mingling batch could be as many as 200 barrels or more. In contrast, a mingle for a small batch might be 20 barrels or fewer.

    ... Today, Bourbon barrels are charred to different degrees, ranked from one to four, depending on the depth of the bum. Single-barrel and small-batch Bourbons are usually aged in a three or four char barrel (moderate to heavy). The charring not only darkens the wood but also caramelizes some of the natural sugars in the oak.

    During the aging process, the whiskey is said to "breathe" in the barrel, expanding into the wood over the hotter months and contracting out of it in the winter. Since color and flavor are transferred to the Bourbon while it is in the wood, summer is the most important time in the warehouse. Distillers often refer to it as the "aging" season. Naturally, the longer a Bourbon is aged, the more flavor it takes from the wood.

    Mitch

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    Hey Mitch,

    Great article! I had never really quite understood what distinguished "bourbon" from other american whisk(e)y's, now it's a bit more clear.

    For anyone out there, what's the difference between "Rye" and bourbon (I am guessing it has something to do with adding rye to the mix.)

    RVG

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    Quote Originally Posted by reginald-van-gleason
    Hey Mitch,

    Great article! I had never really quite understood what distinguished "bourbon" from other american whisk(e)y's, now it's a bit more clear.

    For anyone out there, what's the difference between "Rye" and bourbon (I am guessing it has something to do with adding rye to the mix.)

    RVG
    I suspect you are right...the addition of the rye grain changes the taste and of course the contents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchll
    I suspect you are right...the addition of the rye grain changes the taste and of course the contents.
    In the United States, in order to be "Rye Whiskey" it must be distilled with at least 51% rye. Bourbon has between 51%-80% corn.
    Last edited by mike; 10-13-2005 at 12:50 PM.
    ~ mike

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