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Thread: Rubber or leather Where do you stand?

  1. Default

    when your somewhere that has monsoons....

  2. #22
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    Jul 2011
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    Singapore
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    I prefer leather soles, but here they are just not practical. Even as I type we are having our second thunderstorm of the day: the first this morning so the pavements are soaked and now having just got home wet again! Leather soles just don't dry out in this humidity.
    Driving down the razor's edge 'tween the past and the future

  3. #23

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    I prefer the rubber topy's you can install over a leather sole. I find for me, I tend to slip often if I just have the leather sole (and this is even after I have probably broken in the leather sole). I will add an interesting point, that I recently visiting with both John Lobb, Ltd (UK-family owned) and George Cleverley and asked them which is better (leather only or leather with rubber topy's) and was given two different answers. John Lobb recommended no rubber topy's as it will not let the leather breathe and the sole may separate over time. George Cleverley said that the rubber topy's are fine and will not harm the shoe (and even make the most sense in the majority of climates and walking conditions) and that it might even extend the life of the shoe since the leather soles will not need to be replaced as often. Two differing opinions from two great shoemakers. The debate rages on!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Twin Cities
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    2,977

    Default

    rubber soles have their place, especially for those looking for comfort, but I prefer leather soles

  5. #25
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    Aug 2005
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    Dress shoes are definately leather...rubber soles or leather with sole guards for those of us who has to walk all day for a living and especially for those who make a living tracking over asphalt, concrete and tile....
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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpdunn01 View Post
    I prefer the rubber topy's you can install over a leather sole. I find for me, I tend to slip often if I just have the leather sole (and this is even after I have probably broken in the leather sole). I will add an interesting point, that I recently visiting with both John Lobb, Ltd (UK-family owned) and George Cleverley and asked them which is better (leather only or leather with rubber topy's) and was given two different answers. John Lobb recommended no rubber topy's as it will not let the leather breathe and the sole may separate over time. George Cleverley said that the rubber topy's are fine and will not harm the shoe (and even make the most sense in the majority of climates and walking conditions) and that it might even extend the life of the shoe since the leather soles will not need to be replaced as often. Two differing opinions from two great shoemakers. The debate rages on!
    I definitely prefer a leather sole reinforced with a rubber pad. I read somewhere that rubbing the sole with raw potatoe can give it some extra grip. I try not to wear the same pair of shoes more than once a week, so I'm not too worried about them wearing out any time soon.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chicago
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    2,799

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    All my dressier shoes are leather sole with a rubber stick on added after break in. I've never seen any evidence of damage to the shoe by the rubber stick-on. I can understand that it has potential to cause damage but it's better than slipping over IMO.
    Rick

  8. #28

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    I'm a big fan of the AE models that have the removable orthotic. They have a rubber sole from the factory so I'm inclined to favor that design

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Bay Area
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    213

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    Unless it's raining heavy, I only wear leather soles. I personally think they are more comfortable for walking (as long as they're not cheap)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Lexington, MA
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    Is the OP talking about Topys (i.e. a rubber "laminate" on top of leather soles) or actual rubber soles to dress shoes? I have a pair of dress shoes that the cobbler attached Topys to and I'm not a fan. I like my dress shoes to have leather soles; I don't know how much I buy into the "breathability" argument but, once worn in, they are nice a flexible and feel like slippers. I can actually "feel" the topography of the ground as I walk (in a good way). I live in Boston so when its snowy and salty or a spring monsoon, I have my rubber-soled dress boots (AE Bayfields) but otherwise, leather-soled shoes handle light rain even light snow very well. Properly waterproofed and conditioned of course. And also not worn for 48 hours afterward and nice red cedar trees put in immediately after.

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