Page 2 of 37 FirstFirst 1234 12 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 727

Thread: Making a hone

  1. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Krodor View Post
    Kremer's Pigments...buy bags of 0.5 micron CrOx.
    http://www.kremerpigments.com/shopus...&product=44200
    Those are bags of 0.3 micron CrOx. Check out the PDF that is linked, it says it's verified by electron microscope.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Hudson Valley...New York
    Posts
    2,218

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PapaFish View Post
    Those are bags of 0.3 micron CrOx. Check out the PDF that is linked, it says it's verified by electron microscope.
    Golly, guess my 10 dollar bag o' green is finer stuff than I remembered. Should last my lifetime, plus several generations on my balsa. Might be fun to speed up the usage and make a hone out of it tho. Im subscribed....

    Thanks for the correction!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Stabekk, Norway
    Posts
    2,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thatsilverguy View Post
    Man... "it cant be done" ...lol.

    Didn't I see that in another thread... ? Seriously, the Belgians and Japanese seem to have a corner on the coticule markets since they supposedly have the best native stones to work with. The best natural stones supposedly come from certain schists - I am not an expert, I just read the Wikipedia article.

    So I guess my question to you is - Are you trying to make a synthetic stone like Norton? Or are you thinking of carving a coticule out of your local native rock?
    Coticule is a specific Belgian type of stone, you can't find any in Japan.
    Blix

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blix View Post
    Coticule is a specific Belgian type of stone, you can't find any in Japan.
    I thought the literal translation for Coticule was "razor hone". I think of the Belgian hone when it's said, but I understood what he meant just the same.

  5. #25

    Default

    I think -- the word coticule was coined to refer to, in general, 'whetstones' of the spessartine-quartzite type..but I could be mistaken.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,966
    Images
    13

    Default

    I recall one of the razor hones at my Dad's is "Vulcanized" implying it is an abrasive set in hard rubber. I have an identical "stone" but it does not have the label.

    Very interesting using shellac and an abrasive powder, do you set it on a substrate or use it self-supporting?

    Phil

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    606
    Thread Starter

    Default

    Actually I did read about Grinding wheels being help together with vulcanized rubber. But only with wheels designed for being spun at high rpm's. And at first I am going to try it using a mold. From what I have read from the problems others have had with there first hone casting was air bubbles. Because you are using 3-9 times more abrasive than adhesive (depending on the properties you want of your hone). Which can be avoided by either pressing the mold or adding a thinner. I already made a hone with different materials yesterday with different ingredients. I'll post some pics when It is done curing.

  8. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xMackx View Post
    Actually I did read about Grinding wheels being help together with vulcanized rubber. But only with wheels designed for being spun at high rpm's. And at first I am going to try it using a mold. From what I have read from the problems others have had with there first hone casting was air bubbles. Because you are using 3-9 times more abrasive than adhesive (depending on the properties you want of your hone). Which can be avoided by either pressing the mold or adding a thinner. I already made a hone with different materials yesterday with different ingredients. I'll post some pics when It is done curing.
    How long do you think that curing time will be on the prototype hone?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    606
    Thread Starter

    Default Prototype 1

    This is my first hone attempt. It has just gotten done curing and I like the shape.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 100_0827.jpg   100_0828.jpg   100_0829.jpg  

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,966
    Images
    13

    Default

    Sparkley!

    3 days cure, not too bad. Did you start with dry shellac, or did you use something that was already mixed? What is the abrasive in this stone?

    Phil

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    sw ar
    Posts
    1,864
    Images
    7

    Default

    i say go for it!we used to pick up ar stone off the ground and work them into a flat shape.made some good one if i recll correctly.being in sw ar its easy to find good stone laying around everywhere if you know what to look for.ive never tried to cast a hone stone but it cant be that hard if your willing to work for it.
    Where's the kaboom? There was supposed to be an earth-shattering kaboom!

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    606
    Thread Starter

    Default

    I used extremely fine grit foundry sand. Just tested it a little bit, and it works! It feels really smooth, polishes and hones like a finishing stone. And the sparkles you see is the quartz/silica in the foundry grade sand.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    550

    Default

    If you don't mind me asking, what was your mold? The shape is about perfect to me and I'm looking to try something very similar with the Linde-A purchased this past weekend.
    VENI, VIDI, TOTONDI!

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    606
    Thread Starter

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
    If you don't mind me asking, what was your mold? The shape is about perfect to me and I'm looking to try something very similar with the Linde-A purchased this past weekend.
    I actually used a mini bread pan... I really love the shape it made. I'm thinking about looking for different sized/shaped ones since it turned out so well.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,966
    Images
    13

    Default

    It looks nice and a pleasing shape, but I prefer longish narrow hones. Ever think about a piece of plastic pipe? It can be formed rectangular or left round. Just a thought.

    Phil

  16. #36
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Hudson Valley...New York
    Posts
    2,218

    Default

    Recipe when you think you've got a winner!!!

  17. #37

    Default

    Why not try JB-Stick?. Its a two part, steel reinforced epoxy. Its clay like in its unmixed form. While your kneading the two parts together, introduce the abrasive into the mix. Knead it to distribute the abrasive throughout the epoxy.
    After the abrasive has been added (and kneaded) shape the clay like epoxy into the shape of your hone.
    Its waterproof, and because you mixed the abrasive completely into the mixture, you will always have fresh abrasive, even as the hone wears.
    Total time for the JB Stick to harden is 20 minutes.
    JB Stick is manufactured by the same company that makes JB Cold Weld.
    Good luck and if you try it, let us know how you make out.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    606
    Thread Starter

    Default

    Thanks for the appreciation and interest guys. This is something I'm serious about. Who knows, maybe someday when I get different recipes for different grits I may just add them to my business.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    550

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eastomjac View Post
    i say go for it!we used to pick up ar stone off the ground and work them into a flat shape.made some good one if i recll correctly.being in sw ar its easy to find good stone laying around everywhere if you know what to look for.ive never tried to cast a hone stone but it cant be that hard if your willing to work for it.
    Very fortunate for you! We have lots of rock out here which is at least related to novaculite, cryptocrystaline quartz in many varieties, and I suspect there is some novaculite out there in the mineralized areas bordering some of the intrusive igneous outcrops. But the deposits, if they exist, will be small. Nothing of commercial scope, but interesting for a rockhound, which I was at one time. Now... I wonder where to find better detail on the Belgian coticules? I seem to remember something about deposits of garnet in the 4 corners area. Lots of sedimentary stone up there too. Problem being, mineralogical detail on the coticules has been scarce.

    I was in a lapidary shop recently and saw a very interesting piece of petrified wood. Unusually uniform, I spent a little time running my fingers over it and thinking. Might go back and pick that one up. Make a nice paperweight if nothing else.

    Of course, that doesn't mean I've lost any interest in the hone making endeavors. Just another interesting avenue of inquiry.
    VENI, VIDI, TOTONDI!

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    1,576
    Images
    4

    Default

    very nice i never thought that youd get around to it.
    put up a pic of a honed edge on this hone when you can

Similar Threads

  1. Hone vs Barbers Hone vs Coticule and the unknown
    By vigorous.elbows in forum Hones/Honing
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-25-2011, 12:07 PM
  2. FS: Spyderco Hones, Barber's Hone, People's Hone
    By wdwrx in forum Shaving Mall - Buy/Sell/Trade
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-11-2010, 10:05 PM
  3. Aloxite hone and Panama hone grit sizes?
    By Howard Newell in forum General Straight Razor Talk
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-01-2007, 04:53 PM
  4. College Athletes Making the Grade or Making a Buck?
    By TimmyBoston in forum The Barber Shop
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 01-06-2007, 08:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
By accessing Badger & Blade, you agree to abide by the Terms of Usage. You can find our Privacy Policy here.
Once submitted, any posts, images, or content become the property of Badger & Blade.
Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.