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Thread: Pinaud Medicated Talc

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Pinaud Medicated Talc

    Great product for those with sensitive skin, turns irritation into smoothness in no time. Also the tingle you get from this product is spectacular. After shaving around my beard as usual I experienced a little redness, I have never used talc before but WOW I will be using this product for the rest of my life!

    Discussion tread
    Last edited by Jim; 08-30-2007 at 07:22 PM.

  2. #2
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    Love this talc. It works wonders after an aftershave. A bit on a hanky takes the "shine" right out of a BBS face.
    Daniel

    "Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it."
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  3. #3

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    Unfortunately Talc is a proven carcinogen.. damn - I used to love talc too !

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by topcattcw View Post
    Unfortunately Talc is a proven carcinogen.. damn - I used to love talc too !
    The effects of talc on the respiratory system are greatly exaggerated. It is also a myth that refined talc powder contains carcinogens. Magnesium Trisilicate, (what Talcum is refined from) in its native form contains trace amounts of asbestos. When this was found out in 1971, the law was passed to keep asbestos out of talc powder. However, there never was asbestos in talc before that law- it was passed in order to simply quell the fear of consumers who thought that talc would kill them.

    Talc powder is baby powder- if it could kill an adult it wouldn't be marketed towards infants . Do a google search about cancer myths and talc powder- it's a myth that doesn't exist and has been debunked by every reputable cancer research agency in the world.
    Rob

  5. #5
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    A great product, both for the face and "sweaty" parts. Price is not bad at all considering how long a container will last you. Classic, powdery (duh) Clubman scent. Works all day, even in the torturously hot and humid South Carolina summers.
    "Life's too short for good handwriting." -Dad.

  6. #6
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    I love this talc. It works well on the face as well as other areas. It keeps the feet dry, smells nice, and knocks down the sheen from a really good shave.

    Two thumbs up.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClubmanRob View Post
    The effects of talc on the respiratory system are greatly exaggerated. It is also a myth that refined talc powder contains carcinogens. Magnesium Trisilicate, (what Talcum is refined from) in its native form contains trace amounts of asbestos. When this was found out in 1971, the law was passed to keep asbestos out of talc powder. However, there never was asbestos in talc before that law- it was passed in order to simply quell the fear of consumers who thought that talc would kill them.

    Talc powder is baby powder- if it could kill an adult it wouldn't be marketed towards infants . Do a google search about cancer myths and talc powder- it's a myth that doesn't exist and has been debunked by every reputable cancer research agency in the world.
    Hmmm ... if you think that the cosmetic/baby products industry cares about more about a high incedent rate of cancer vs profits... I have a bridge that I would love to sell you !

    .... this from the Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616.

    Talc (magnesium silicate) is a widely used, generally considered benign substance. It is principally used as an inert filler material in drug tablets or as a drying ingredient in baby powders. However, in both cases inappropriate use can lead to severe pulmonary toxicological responses. On the one hand, intravenous injection of 'solubilized', CNS active pills can produce microemboli in small pulmonary vessels. This can lead to various degrees of granuloma formation, compromised pulmonary function, or death. Overzealous application of baby powder can also produce severe pulmonary complications if the infant inspires the powder. Although the data are relatively scarce, a number of reports suggest the existence of a chronic problem in this area.


    .... this from NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Talc (CAS No. 14807-96-6)(Non-Asbestiform) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).
    CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of these inhalation studies, there was some evidence of carcinogenic activity of talc in male F344/N rats based on an increased incidence of benign or malignant pheochromocytomas of the adrenal gland. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of talc in female F344/N rats based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas of the lung and benign or malignant pheochromocytomas of the adrenal gland.


    There is a lot more - if you want some links, I can provide them ... But I certainly would never let an infant breath this stuff..
    Last edited by topcattcw; 02-24-2009 at 09:51 AM. Reason: spelling correction

  8. #8

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    If you cover your baby's face with talcum powder and the baby can't breath, then of course the child can die. Show me a link that proves there is a link between appropriate use and lung failure. Show me a link that shows evidence that using talc everyday for the rest of your life will cause you to possibly develop life threatening respiratory disease.

    You can misuse any product with dire consequences. If you drink too much water, you can die from that too.

    Edit: I just realized that the eggheads at USC referred to Talc as magnesium silicate. You would think that being scientists and all they would know the difference between Magnesium [tri]silicate and common talcum powder, but hey- when you have an agenda to push facts be damned! (USC's health research is well funded by certain, uh, let's say "special interests" groups which kind of leaves a suspect mark on most aspects of their research by the rest of the unbiased scientific community).
    Last edited by ClubmanRob; 02-24-2009 at 11:45 AM.
    Rob

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClubmanRob View Post
    If you cover your baby's face with talcum powder and the baby can't breath, then of course the child can die. Show me a link that proves there is a link between appropriate use and lung failure. Show me a link that shows evidence that using talc everyday for the rest of your life will cause you to possibly develop life threatening respiratory disease.

    You can misuse any product with dire consequences. If you drink too much water, you can die from that too.

    Edit: I just realized that the eggheads at USC referred to Talc as magnesium silicate. You would think that being scientists and all they would know the difference between Magnesium [tri]silicate and common talcum powder, but hey- when you have an agenda to push facts be damned! (USC's health research is well funded by certain, uh, let's say "special interests" groups which kind of leaves a suspect mark on most aspects of their research by the rest of the unbiased scientific community).
    well ... you see inappropriate use as covering a baby's face with talc.. while even Johnson considers inappropriate use as getting it near a baby's face .. here are the warnings on a container of Johnsons:

    For external use only.
    Keep out of reach of children.
    Close tightly after use.
    Do not use on broken skin.
    Avoid contact with eyes.
    Keep powder away from child's face to avoid inhalation, which can cause breathing problems.


    and you even thought up a secret agenda for USC ...

    oh by the way here is the definition of talc:

    Talc (derived from the Persian via Arabic talq) is a mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate with the chemical formula H2Mg3(SiO3)4 or Mg3Si4O10(OH)2. In loose form, it is the widely used substance known as talcum powder.


    .. and did you even read the second reference that I posted from the National Toxicology Progam? .. or did you just choose not to address it? Or maybe they have a secret agenda too? ... or maybe it's just mice - and it should be discounted based upon the size of the mammal?

    ( Once again - from the NTP ...
    CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of these inhalation studies, there was some evidence of carcinogenic activity of talc in male F344/N rats based on an increased incidence of benign or malignant pheochromocytomas of the adrenal gland. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of talc in female F344/N rats based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas of the lung and benign or malignant pheochromocytomas of the adrenal gland. )

    I know I won't convince you ... you love your talc and won't give it up ... just please don't shake it around the baby !!

  10. #10

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    This is getting WAY off topic, but I'll bite.

    I asked you for any evidence that using talc everyday in the way you're supposed to use it will harm you. You can't because talc doesn't kill people.

    If you force-feed talc powder to lab rats, crazy things are bound to happen. Lab rats get cancer from ingesting powdered Kool Aid, so again no evidence showing that talc harms humans when used appropriately.

    The research labs of USC have long been held suspect because of their rich daddy warbucks coffers, so whatever new "finding" they reach I take with a grain of salt. Of course, I am biased in that I'm a professional member of the scientific community that stands for unbiased information from those doing the research, so I can understand why someone that doesn't swing beakers for a living may not fully appreciate that funding by special interest groups for research is unethical and "science for hire", of which the labs of USC have whored themselves out since the sixties. No offense to the alumni of USC, as it's a great school. Their labs, however, are one step above an underfunded community college.

    And here's a crash course in the periodic table regarding chemical breakdown: Talc is not magnesium trisilicate: http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1696465

    or

    http://www.bookrags.com/research/mag...ydroxide-chmc/

    Magnesium trisilicate is found in talc. Talc is soapstone, a geological formation. Talc appears in talcum powder as a base. Talc also appears in most processed foods, clothing and printed matter.

    Saying that talcum powder is the same chemical as magnesium trisilicate is as intelligent as pointing at a tree and calling it a rock. They're both comprised of the same chemicals, but they're two different beasts. It's understandable that a layperson wouldn't make the connection, but for a group of professional scientists making an almost inexcusable error in descriptive theorem- well, it doesn't surprise me coming from USC. Remember, it was the cancer lab at USC who first suggested that nicotine was not an addictive substance and that tar was beneficial- its all been downhill since then. The only difference is that RJ Reynolds and Phillip Morris don't contribute donations to the cancer research lab anymore.

    As for my personal use of Talc, I use Clubman on my feet. I'll be careful not to slip and land face forward into a giant mound of Pinaud and inhale vigorously for up to thirty minutes.
    Rob

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClubmanRob View Post
    This is getting WAY off topic, but I'll bite.

    I asked you for any evidence that using talc everyday in the way you're supposed to use it will harm you. You can't because talc doesn't kill people.

    If you force-feed talc powder to lab rats, crazy things are bound to happen. Lab rats get cancer from ingesting powdered Kool Aid, so again no evidence showing that talc harms humans when used appropriately.

    The research labs of USC have long been held suspect because of their rich daddy warbucks coffers, so whatever new "finding" they reach I take with a grain of salt. Of course, I am biased in that I'm a professional member of the scientific community that stands for unbiased information from those doing the research, so I can understand why someone that doesn't swing beakers for a living may not fully appreciate that funding by special interest groups for research is unethical and "science for hire", of which the labs of USC have whored themselves out since the sixties. No offense to the alumni of USC, as it's a great school. Their labs, however, are one step above an underfunded community college.

    And here's a crash course in the periodic table regarding chemical breakdown: Talc is not magnesium trisilicate: http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1696465

    or

    http://www.bookrags.com/research/mag...ydroxide-chmc/

    Magnesium trisilicate is found in talc. Talc is soapstone, a geological formation. Talc appears in talcum powder as a base. Talc also appears in most processed foods, clothing and printed matter.

    Saying that talcum powder is the same chemical as magnesium trisilicate is as intelligent as pointing at a tree and calling it a rock. They're both comprised of the same chemicals, but they're two different beasts. It's understandable that a layperson wouldn't make the connection, but for a group of professional scientists making an almost inexcusable error in descriptive theorem- well, it doesn't surprise me coming from USC. Remember, it was the cancer lab at USC who first suggested that nicotine was not an addictive substance and that tar was beneficial- its all been downhill since then. The only difference is that RJ Reynolds and Phillip Morris don't contribute donations to the cancer research lab anymore.

    As for my personal use of Talc, I use Clubman on my feet. I'll be careful not to slip and land face forward into a giant mound of Pinaud and inhale vigorously for up to thirty minutes.
    I agree that this is way off topic - and the moderator will probably stomp us at some point

    anyway...

    very nice rant ... however - they didn't even call it magnesium trisilicate (which is nothing more than an antacid) - if you read the post again .. they called it magnesium silicate (atomic number 12, relative atomic mass 24.305 - of which the hydrated versions are talc and asbestos)

    I understand that talc is found in clothing, food, plants, etc - in fact it is even an necessary part of the human diet ... but in trace elements only ! - not pure powder form... (which is quite possibly inappropriate use .. )

    Also - it's almost impossible to prove that any specific thing caused a person to get cancer and die ... there are those that still believe that smoking tobacco doesn't have anything to do with lung cancer. All you can do is judge for yourself and adjust your lifestyle accordingly..

    ..and - I do hope that you are not truly a member of the scientific community - because in one fell swoop you dispelled all research conducted using lab rats.. (poor little guys died in vain .. ! )


    Bottom line ... you love your talc .. and will take your chances until someone (other than USC) can prove that people got cancer specifically from talc .

    - and that's okay too!
    Last edited by topcattcw; 02-25-2009 at 01:58 PM. Reason: spelling

  12. #12

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    I'll agree to end this here, with agreeing to disagree. If you want to carry on lets start a thread in the Skin Care forums.



    very nice rant ... however - they didn't even call it magnesium trisilicate (which is nothing more than an antacid) - if you read the post again .. they called it magnesium silicate (atomic number 12, relative atomic mass 24.305 - of which the hydrated versions are talc and asbestos)
    The difference between Mg. Sil and Mg. Tri-Sil is the amount of water used to hydrocrack. "Trisilicate" is more accurate a description than plain "silicate", due to the amount of h2o involved. Talc is a tri-silicate compound, not a solitary silicate. It's not just "an antacid".

    Generally, when being discussed, no discernment is made to the molecular structure of a silicate in regards to water, so a general term for any form of silicate is just plain silicate, whether they be Bi-, Tri-, or Poly-. A better analogy would be that while cars, trucks, and vans can all be called automobiles, it's more accurate to describe which class of automobile we're talking about.

    BTW, you answered your own argument: "of which the hydrated versions are talc and asbestos". Hydrated silicate= trisilicate. But, uh, asbestos is not hydrated magnesium silicate in any way- close, but no cigar. (I take it you pulled that description from a Medical Journal and not a geological or chemical study?) But that's another argument for another day.

    I understand that talc is found in clothing, food, plants, etc - in fact it is even an necessary part of the human diet ... but in trace elements only ! - not pure powder form... (which is quite possibly inappropriate use ..
    But this is what you're missing, talcum powder is not pure talc in powdered form! It never was, and it never will be. Talc is the base from what talcum powder is created from, but "talc" and "talc powder" are not the same thing. Talc powder has more talc in it, then say a bowl of rice, but when applied to the skin away from the bronchial tubes we actually absorb less talc that way then we do from that same bowl of rice.

    Also - it's almost impossible to prove that any specific thing caused a person to get cancer and die ... there are those that still believe that smoking tobacco doesn't have anything to do with lung cancer. All you can do is judge for yourself and adjust your lifestyle accordingly..
    Agreed. "Proving" rarely happens, but "reasonable" evidence is another. But theories aren't facts, which is why we have such discussions.

    ..and - I do hope that you are not truly a member of the scientific community - because in one fell swoop you dispelled all research conducted using lab rats.. (poor little guys died in vain .. ! )
    I'm not a rat hugging hippy by any means, but I do believe they haven't contributed anything to the cause of science since the advent of penicillin. Most labs don't use them any more, because the data compiled from using them as test subjects is so erratic and easily misconstrued as to render any work done with them as inconclusive. I haven't personally touched an animal test subject since the frozen frog in my high school biology class.

    I'm a strong advocate of releasing animals from lab testing, unless the testing is specifically related to vaccines and medicines involving the same genus of animal. If you're trying to find a cure for the mange, you shouldn't test humans for an animal ailment and vice versa. I do think that millions of animals (not just rodents) have died in vain in the course of research.

    Now let's try to pass that bill that lets us experiment on condemned prisoners!


    Bottom line ... you love your talc .. and will take your chances until someone (other than USC) can prove that people got cancer specifically from talc .
    If any reputable agency produced independent research showing a viable link between appropriate talc powder usage and human respiratory failure or cancer, I would seriously consider not using any form of medicated talcum powder. You have my word. I've read probably every study done on the subject, and have found no links whatsoever. Nor has the American Cancer Society, the AJR, the ERJ, or any reputable cancer research group in the world. In fact, most doctors, chemists and lung surgeons use talc powder to treat lung disease. Talc powder has been proven beyond the shadow of a doubt to slow or stop the growth of cancerous tumors in patients suffering from all types of chronic lung disease, so you can see why most scientists have gotten away from the "cancer causing" myth and actually use it to treat cancer.

    But like I said, to each their own. Your opinion is fine, and I'm not trying to make you use something you feel so strongly against. I just see no reason to be alarmed, but you do, and that's ok as well.
    Rob

  13. #13

    Default Great for more than the face!

    I purchased this yesterday to take a little shine off the face, but my skin is too dark, so it makes me look like a theatre minstrel. Used it down south and it kept me cool all day!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by topcattcw View Post
    Unfortunately Talc is a proven carcinogen.. damn - I used to love talc too !
    I've heard the main danger is ovarian cancer. Ya better keep it out of your panties
    [url=http://wiki.badgerandblade.com/index.php/User:Erichuntley-9833]My Shaving Gear[/url]

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigerblades View Post
    I purchased this yesterday to take a little shine off the face, but my skin is too dark, so it makes me look like a theatre minstrel. Used it down south and it kept me cool all day!


    I am literally standing in a CVS reading this review on my phone before buying clubman talc, and this post made me laugh to an attention-grabbing degree for six aisles both ways.
    Well my heart's runnin' round like a chicken with its head cut off
    All around the barn yard falling in and out of love

  16. #16
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    I love this stuff! The wonderful Clubmen scent in a talc. I use it daily
    Johnny Dale

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