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Thread: Buffer RPMs and greaseless compound

  1. #1
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    Default Buffer RPMs and greaseless compound

    I've read that the proper speed for a buffer to use greaseless buffing compound is about 1700 RPMs.

    My buffer is one speed, about 3450 RPMs, and I'm not planning on buying another buffer.

    Is there any real harm that will occur if I apply all grits at 3400? Especially the 80 and 120?

    Any special suggestions as how to apply the compound at twice the recommended RPMs?

    Thanks
    Freehand

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    I just had a look at mine and it's listed as 2850 rpm and I run all the greaseless compound with no dramas.

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    Exclamation Oh my...

    I truly hope the both of you stay as lucky as you have been. A 1725 rpm buffer is bad enough and covets the title of the most dangerous tool in the shop. It has the ability to embed a blade in your thigh if it gets snagged by the wheel just right. A 3450 will take the leg off! Gone! Bye bye! Not only that, but the 3450 generates a tremendous amount of heat and can cause a loss of temper if you are not careful. Please don't think I'm scolding you guys or anything. You are gonna do what you're gonna do and I know that. Some folks just love living in the fast lane.

    But for anyone who hasn't picked up a buffer yet, do not get anything over 1725 rpms. It would also be cheaper to get a new buffer than to purchase the controller that could reduce the speed of either of these buffers mentioned here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BillEllis View Post
    I truly hope the both of you stay as lucky as you have been. A 1725 rpm buffer is bad enough and covets the title of the most dangerous tool in the shop. It has the ability to embed a blade in your thigh if it gets snagged by the wheel just right. A 3450 will take the leg off! Gone! Bye bye! Not only that, but the 3450 generates a tremendous amount of heat and can cause a loss of temper if you are not careful. Please don't think I'm scolding you guys or anything. You are gonna do what you're gonna do and I know that. Some folks just love living in the fast lane.

    But for anyone who hasn't picked up a buffer yet, do not get anything over 1725 rpms. It would also be cheaper to get a new buffer than to purchase the controller that could reduce the speed of either of these buffers mentioned here.
    Listen to Bob here. Oh, sorry, Bill
    The buffer is an evil tool!
    A good friend of mine worked at a slaughter-house for many years & he has seen a couple of guys getting severe slashes from flying knifes.
    Their standard sharpening routine for the knifes were a low grit wheel, high grit wheel & final buffing on CrOx wheel.
    When they had cut up the right amount of pigs for the day, they could go home, so naturally everyone was doing things as fast as possible.
    Also cranking up the speed on the wheels as fast as possible...

    The worst injury he's seen was a guy who was buffing a fillet-knife when it caught in the wheel, flung right thru his heavy leather apron & went straight thru the inside of his thigh, the point of the knife sticking out on the back of the leg...

    So beware guys, if nothing else; wear a jockstrap
    Can-can scratch patterns!

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    Hey Phoned, real men buff fast.


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    Quote Originally Posted by johnmrson View Post
    Hey Phoned, real men buff fast.

    Sorry MrJason, I forgot you were Aussie.
    You are a bit tougher then most of us sissy Europeans.
    After all, your national sport encourages people to step on each other with aluminum-spiked shoes
    Can-can scratch patterns!

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    Stupid question maybe, but what is a buffer?
    Rune

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zephyr View Post
    Stupid question maybe, but what is a buffer?


    Basically a bench grinder (bänkslipmaskin) but with cotton/felt wheels instead.
    The nicer ones has variable speed.
    You apply either the "greaseless" which is abrasives & glue mixed or a buffing compound that is available in various coarseness.
    Can-can scratch patterns!

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    Here's mine...


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    I'll echo what others have said here that a buffer is the most dangerous equipment used for restoration. I bought a variable speed bench grinder (1725-3450 rpms) and the lowest setting is more than plenty and still scary at that.

    If you go this route though, make sure to buy some extra long shaft extenders (I got mine from caswell plating) to keep the razor away from the motor so you can work comfortably in the safety zone of the buffer wheel.

    While it makes the job on the razor go by much more swiftly than hand sanding, it is undoubtedly the most dangerous tool. That said, I think it is safer than trying to do the same job with a dremel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BillEllis View Post
    Here's mine...

    That is a beautiful buffer. Baldor?

    I agree with Bill, 1725 is the highest I'd recommend on buffers. If you know what you're doing you'll be fine but when you get to rouges IMO the lower RPM's the better, especially crox on flannel cotton wheels.

    Also, I love buffing and polishing but the only tool I actually have fear of is the darn buffer. I've had razors shoot out of my hand greaseless fly over and under my glasses and even cut myself on the razor because I was concentrating so much on it that I didn't realize my hand was on the edge. I'd rather cut 1x1 wedges on my band saw that use those wheels.

    I also suggest a very thick apron

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    I have a couple take out motors from copiers that run at 1750 or thereabouts and have arbors from Caswells to hold the wheels. I don't use greaseless compounds and I don't take off much metal with the buffers as I don't like the orange peel look that often leaves behind, so I use mine mostly to remove light rust and polish up brush handles and razors.

    My motors don't have a lot of torque but even so I've had them grab brush handles or razors out of my hands and fling them at high speed across the room. Lost a nice catalin handle that way, and broke a nice pair of razor scales, but no damage to me.

    Clearly a tool that requires caution and vigilance. You could slow the wheel surface velocity down a bit by using smaller diameter wheels I suppose, but that comes at a cost.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BillEllis View Post
    Here's mine...

    Now that is a buffing station worth it's name
    Can-can scratch patterns!

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    i was at harbor freight the other day and was thinking about using their 6" buffer with a router controller.

    * Works with any universal AC/DC brush-type motor, 15 amps and under
    * 3-way rocker switch: Full/Variable/Off
    * Dial controls the variable speed (high, medium or low)
    * 6 ft. cord



    this looks like it might work... any thoughts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by global_dev View Post
    i was at harbor freight the other day and was thinking about using their 6" buffer with a router controller.

    * Works with any universal AC/DC brush-type motor, 15 amps and under
    * 3-way rocker switch: Full/Variable/Off
    * Dial controls the variable speed (high, medium or low)
    * 6 ft. cord



    this looks like it might work... any thoughts?
    I tried one. It's kind of weird. The buffer runs at normal speed but lacks power so as soon as you touch something to the wheel it slows down. I'm not a big fan of the buffer so I can't really comment on any long term or extensive use.
    [I]"Find out what it is in life you don’t do well, and then don’t do that thing.” - Most Interesting Man in the World[/I]

    - Kevin

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    Quote Originally Posted by global_dev View Post
    i was at harbor freight the other day and was thinking about using their 6" buffer with a router controller.

    * Works with any universal AC/DC brush-type motor, 15 amps and under
    * 3-way rocker switch: Full/Variable/Off
    * Dial controls the variable speed (high, medium or low)
    * 6 ft. cord



    this looks like it might work... any thoughts?
    That's interesting. I like the idea since I have a buffer from Harbor Freight but I'm pretty use to it and know my limitations.

    I wonder if there would be a way to know the RPM's it can go down to?

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    Quote Originally Posted by azmark View Post
    That is a beautiful buffer. Baldor?

    I agree with Bill, 1725 is the highest I'd recommend on buffers. If you know what you're doing you'll be fine but when you get to rouges IMO the lower RPM's the better, especially crox on flannel cotton wheels.

    Also, I love buffing and polishing but the only tool I actually have fear of is the darn buffer. I've had razors shoot out of my hand greaseless fly over and under my glasses and even cut myself on the razor because I was concentrating so much on it that I didn't realize my hand was on the edge. I'd rather cut 1x1 wedges on my band saw that use those wheels.

    I also suggest a very thick apron
    I just noticed but how the heck is your wall so clean. I have a disaster

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    Quote Originally Posted by azmark View Post
    I just noticed but how the heck is your wall so clean. I have a disaster
    That was the first thing I noticed. I was going to ask "Have you actually used this buffer?".

    Look closely. There are clear acrylic panels screwed to the wall in line with the wheels. Only a compulsive tool-head would wipe those down, but it appears that is exactly what Bill does.

  19. #19
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    The buffer rpm rating is not as relevant as the linear speed of the wheel. If you have a high rpm buffer, then you will want to stick with 4" wheels to bring the speed down to a more safe level.

    Be very mindful of the safe and unsafe (kill you) zones of the wheel.

    Wear eye protection.

    Wear a good respirator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by global_dev View Post
    i was at harbor freight the other day and was thinking about using their 6" buffer with a router controller.

    * Works with any universal AC/DC brush-type motor, 15 amps and under
    * 3-way rocker switch: Full/Variable/Off
    * Dial controls the variable speed (high, medium or low)
    * 6 ft. cord



    this looks like it might work... any thoughts?
    It's always been my understanding that the controller you illustrate won't work. It may burn up your motor. That's what I have been told, anyway. I could be wrong. I'd like to be wrong on this one because the controllers that do work for sure start at $1,000.

    The buffer, at $45, looks like a steal, but it's also only 1/2 horse. You'd be able to stop that one from spinning with any kind of force against the wheel at all. It might be ok if you go lightly and slowly. Anyone who has one should chime in.

    My Baldor is a 3/4 horse and I can bog it down a bit at times, but it has enough power most of the time. One like mine will run you right at $500. Google around... maybe somebody can find a 115v/60h on the cheap and let us know. It's very helpful to have the long spindles. I also put a tapered spindle attachment on the left side of mine for quick-change capability of buffs

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