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whiteweed
06-15-2009, 01:11 PM
I would like to purchase a good cheap fountain pen. It would be used for taking notes. I have been looking at Lamy, thats my price range, the Safari and the other one in the same price range with aluminum barrel. My main question would a med. point be ok in this brand. If they lean to the fine side I would go with a med. point, one review I read stated that. any comments are appreciated. They are in the $27 range

RichGem
06-15-2009, 01:16 PM
I would like to purchase a good cheap fountain pen. It would be used for taking notes. I have been looking at Lamy, thats my price range, the Safari and the other one in the same price range with aluminum barrel. My main question would a med. point be ok in this brand. If they lean to the fine side I would go with a med. point, one review I read stated that. any comments are appreciated. They are in the $27 range

I personally don't care for many of the modern FPs... generally, I find them too heavy to write with for long periods of time. I don't particularly care for the styling or feel of the Lamy Safari.

My advice? Go vintage, they're definitely lighter & more comfortable, and usually much less expensive than modern ones.

As far as point (nib) size... the line that gets laid down is going to vary somewhat depending on pen, ink, paper, etc. There's no set definition for what a "med" point is, for ex. For myself, I've found fine points to be best among modern. Vintages seem to be mostly mediums.

Razor&Pens
06-15-2009, 01:27 PM
You can't go wrong with a Lamy Safari or AL Star. They are reliable and hold up well. Their nibs don't write particularly fine for the size (as Japanese pens do.) Note that the Safari may or may not come with the converter included if you intend to fill from a bottle.

Depending on where you are, it's always a good idea to go to a brick & mortar where you can try before you buy. Or better yet, a pen show!

Austin
06-15-2009, 01:36 PM
A medium nib from Lamy is medium. The only medium nibs that run fine are Chinese pens.

whiteweed
06-15-2009, 01:36 PM
Good info, I really like the different points and discussion. Any other POV out there?

whiteweed
06-15-2009, 01:38 PM
What would med be? In metric size? I realize the variables and I tend to write hard and fear a fine point. The brick and mortar trip is in the schedule.

Austin
06-15-2009, 01:40 PM
What would med be? In metric size? I realize the variables and I tend to write hard and fear a fine point. The brick and mortar trip is in the schedule.

The only way to tell is by sampling them. If you have a Paradise Pen in your mall, test them out.

skankpile
06-15-2009, 01:50 PM
I'm a leftie and I prefer fountain pens. I think right handed people can be happier with a broader range of pens, but lefties with their pushy motioned writing really need to have the right spring, size, angled flow, and smoothness that many cheaper nibs cant accommodate.

The cheapest pen that filled the bill for me was a few parkers/watermans. For a good all-round pen I’d recommend the namiki. When I can I use the Montegrappa or DuPont. They all can get funky when you use a bad ink. The namiki you can carry in your pocket and not go through the hassle of screwing, capping, and usually it will not leak. I have had the hardest time keeping the namiki nib clean, but that’s just the way it is.

Its like everything else, you'll never be happy... I learned to type faster than I think and never looked back. If only more people would read right to left and backwards I'd be happy.

whiteweed
06-15-2009, 01:54 PM
Here we go, http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=88123

whiteweed
06-15-2009, 01:57 PM
My advice? Go vintage

What would be an example or two. THANKS

Devil Doc
06-15-2009, 02:28 PM
For about twice what you're willing to spend you can get a working Parker "51" which is 100 times the pen that you're looking at.

Doc.

whiteweed
06-15-2009, 02:28 PM
Any comments on this one "DUKE GENTLEMAN'S BLACK FOUNTAIN PEN" on the bay for $25 looks nice, has features, and cheap.

Austin
06-15-2009, 02:31 PM
Any comments on this one "DUKE GENTLEMAN'S BLACK FOUNTAIN PEN" on the bay for $25 looks nice, has features, and cheap.

I have had luck with Duke pens. Some gents have not. Don't buy on the bay. Buy it here.

http://isellpens.com/duke.htm

Todd is a good guy and will treat you right.

BarryR
06-15-2009, 02:36 PM
I have some Dukes. They're decent for their extremely reasonable prices. If you have $50-$75 to spend you should consider a Pelikan m200, or as mentioned in above posts a Lamy or a Parker 51.

PS: Japanese pens run about 1/2 grade (or even a full grade?) finer than European or American grades so that a Medium is Fine or Medium-Fine.

RichGem
06-15-2009, 03:29 PM
What would be an example or two. THANKS

parker 51's are quite nice and stand up well to heavy hands. older Pelikans (if you can find them), really cool are the Shaeffer Snorkels.

Schwert
06-15-2009, 04:13 PM
Pelikans hands down are my favorites.

The less expensive models are definately above your price point but you should try them out anyway. The 150's have gold plated steel nibs and are great starter pens. I do warn you though, you will advance quickly to the gold nibs....

http://img83.imageshack.us/img83/2772/1935Pelikan2.jpg

I have a Lamy Safari FP that I got long ago...I never did like writing with it much though.

Razor&Pens
06-15-2009, 06:18 PM
A medium nib from Lamy is medium. The only medium nibs that run fine are Chinese pens.

Well, close. As BarryR also posted, Japanese nibs run a grade finer than American & European nibs. That is, a Japanese medium=fine; Japanese broad=medium, etc. Also, There are several very high quality Japanese manufacturers, notably Sailor, Pilot/Namiki and Platinum. (Chinese pens in general are not of the same caliber.)


For about twice what you're willing to spend you can get a working Parker "51" which is 100 times the pen that you're looking at.

Except that Whiteweed indicated that he prefers broader nibs.("If they lean to the fine side I would go with a med.") and Parker 51s, while a great recomendation, are most often available with nibs on the fine side. The P51, since it has a hooded nib, may also not appeal to everyone's aesthetic sense even though they are great, reliable pens.

Pelikans, old or new, are also a great recommendation. Heck, there are a lot of great pens out there.

whiteweed
06-15-2009, 08:52 PM
Thanks guys, checked it all out and went with a couple of Hero to start with the 100 and 300 I think both will be good to learn and grow with. Just one other thing when I got into shaving DE I used "the blades are cheaper" do you think "the ink is cheaper" is going to work?

Austin I bought them from Todd, Thanks.

Thanks to all that posted and as the shaving hobby went I am sure I will have all pens that were suggested one day. Then I will find the New Improved equlevent and there will not be a reason to look any further:001_smile oh no noone said anything about IPAD, right I already had that.

Austin
06-15-2009, 08:55 PM
Ron, I would purchase Private Reserve or Noodlers ink for your new pens. I think Todd sells these lines.

Huy
06-15-2009, 09:15 PM
I have 2 heroes and they are not bad for the price. You can also get the pilot 78g (also sold on isellpens). I think they're much better than the heroes and are only $12.

With inks I want to get every color, I think I have about 20 different inks right now. It's not saving me any money switching to FPs.

RichGem
06-16-2009, 03:36 AM
Ink is pretty much the same dye and water; some have more colors (variety), some will be more saturated (darker) than others. All-in-all try several brands/colors and see what you like.

Above all DO NOT use calligraphy or india ink. These contain binders (usually shellac) & usually pigments (as opposed to dyes, even if they say fountain pen safe) and will gunk up your pen permanently.

BarryR
06-16-2009, 03:40 AM
Thanks guys, checked it all out and went with a couple of Hero to start with the 100 and 300 I think both will be good to learn and grow with. Just one other thing when I got into shaving DE I used "the blades are cheaper" do you think "the ink is cheaper" is going to work?It'll probably work about as well as "the blades are cheaper," which, in my experience means, not at all.:wink:

One difference is that with FPs, the high and luxury end is way more expensive. It's a lot easier to spend $300 on an FP (which gets you an excellent quality, non-rare FP (e.g., Pelikan m800). If you're spending that much on a razor, you're in rarified territory. This is less so for brushes.

Suzuki
06-16-2009, 03:51 AM
Ron, I would purchase Private Reserve or Noodlers ink for your new pens. I think Todd sells these lines.

The Noodlers is a very good choice for Asian pens, as it has very good flow that will help ensure that the finer nibs write smoothly.

Waterman is one of the better widely-available inks - all of my pens digest it with no issues.


I have 2 heroes and they are not bad for the price. You can also get the pilot 78g (also sold on isellpens). I think they're much better than the heroes and are only $12.

I agree 100% with the Pilot 78 recommendation - a heck of a lot of pen for the money and better than the inexpensive Chinese pens I've tried.

With inks I want to get every color, I think I have about 20 different inks right now. It's not saving me any money switching to FPs.


Ink is pretty much the same dye and water; some have more colors (variety), some will be more saturated (darker) than others. All-in-all try several brands/colors and see what you like.

Above all DO NOT use calligraphy or india ink. These contain binders (usually shellac) & usually pigments (as opposed to dyes, even if they say fountain pen safe) and will gunk up your pen permanently.

The warning against calligraphy or india ink is valid.

While the key visual differences are colour and pigment strength, don't be fooled into thinking all inks are the same. The "stuff" that goes into an ink differs between manufacturers and makes a difference. One key difference between inks is viscosity/flow characteristics. For example I've found Sheaffer inks to be quite thin (admittedly its been years since I've used them) which means that a wider nib will lay down a very wet line and the ink tends to feather on all but better quality paper. Noodlers, while a free-flowing ink does not seem to flow as quickly or feather - its a great ink all around, but because it flows so well, it can really do wonders in a pen with a fine nib or where ink flow is an issue. Conversely, a slightly thicker ink (and we're talking very minor differences here) can help improve the performance of a pen that tends to lay down too wet a line.

In short, just like DE blades, there are some inks that work well in most pens (think Derby or IPs) for most people. But there are also situations when a specific ink will really make a pen with a balky nib or feed sing and then its a matter of trial and error - once you find the combination that works, that's what you stick with.

My $0.02.

RichGem
06-16-2009, 04:38 AM
Chris sparked one more comment & to just add to the above...

I personally prefer vintage inks... it just seems appropriate and if kept out of heat and light, bottled ink can last a good long while (I have several bottles of ink from the 30s and 40s that are just fine). One does need to watch out for sedimentation and evaporation, but all in all....

Anyhow, of note in that regard, is that vintage inks (and inks from then still being made like Shaeffer and Parker (most parker variants anyhow) are going to be thinner (colorwise)/less saturated then modern inks b/c that's the way it was back then. Modern made inks tend to be more saturated b/c that's what customers are looking for and modern dyes will allow for that sorta thing. The noteable excepetion to this would be Parker Superchrome which was heavily saturated and is not recommended for use these days b/c even then the superpigmentation (and general formula) was a clogging problem for some pens. Tho the bottles it came in (cobalt blue diamond shapes) were very cool looking.

tsmba
06-16-2009, 07:07 AM
I've tried several inks recently. The most uniformly good brand I've found is Waterman's. I also really like Visconti and Aurora. Private Reserve and Noodler's have some cool colors, but some seem a bit watery.

Razor&Pens
06-16-2009, 07:12 AM
Thanks guys, checked it all out and went with a couple of Hero to start with the 100 and 300 I think both will be good to learn and grow with. Just one other thing when I got into shaving DE I used "the blades are cheaper" do you think "the ink is cheaper" is going to work?

Todd is a reputable vendor. Just be aware that the Heros are servicable but if you're not happy with the way they write, they're not what I'd call a 'good' writing experience. Hero is among the better Chinese pen brands but Chinese pens in general are not great.

Pens are a heck of a lot more expensive than razors and unless you stick with a couple of pens similarly priced to the Heros, ain't no way that same argument is going to work. <g>


You can also get the pilot 78g (also sold on isellpens). I think they're much better than the heroes and are only $12.

+1. While I do not recommend Chinese pens, Japanese pens, including the Pilots, are excellent.

By the way, what nib were you able to get for the Heros? They do run on the fine side.

Razor&Pens
06-16-2009, 07:19 AM
The Noodlers is a very good choice for Asian pens, as it has very good flow that will help ensure that the finer nibs write smoothly.

Waterman is one of the better widely-available inks - all of my pens digest it with no issues.

The warning against calligraphy or india ink is valid.

+1 on Watermans. It is about the most benign ink you can get.

+1 on the warning against calligraphy and india ink.

-1 on the blanket recomendation for Noodler's. I use many of the colors in many of my pens BUT know that the Baystate Blue (and the other colors in that family) do have some issues. A Hero is readily replacable at reasonable cost should you have problems so I'd not worry about it myself.

As others have indicated, different inks will work better or worse in different pens.

GarageBoy
06-16-2009, 07:25 AM
Go with the 78g if you cant get past the looks of the Safari. I'd recommend the Hero 100 if Heros weren't inconsistent

Gruder
06-16-2009, 08:21 AM
FYI to those watching this thread, speaking of Japanese pens, Pilot/Namiki Knights are quite nicely discounted at amazon right now (around $25). I just ordered one in burgundy. I have the blue in rollerball, and really like its heft and style, though the plating is prone to scratching.

whiteweed
06-16-2009, 10:30 AM
Give me some info on the Parker 45. It seems easyer to find than the 51, YMMV. BTW I add a 78g to the order, thanks for the tip, I forget who that credit goes to. My love of pens has spiked:001_wub:

Razor&Pens
06-16-2009, 01:40 PM
Give me some info on the Parker 45. It seems easyer to find than the 51

Both the 45 and the 51 will be readily available from any decent vintage dealer. Aside from the internal differences, the 45 is a less expensive pen - a cartridge/converter filler, as opposed to a self-filler.

The 45 was still manufactured up until recently (may still be?) I picked up a few on closeout at Staples not too many years back.

RichGem
06-16-2009, 01:43 PM
If you go with a 51, tho, you'll want the (comparatively) newer aerometric style filler as opposed to the plunger style. Aeros last forever, plungers may need to be rebuilt in order to function properly.

behrendprof
06-16-2009, 02:04 PM
As to inks, I'm a big fan of Diamine. Great, vintage like colors, excellent reputation. For reviews, see:

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=39354

norman931
06-16-2009, 02:11 PM
If you go with a 51, tho, you'll want the (comparatively) newer aerometric style filler as opposed to the plunger style. Aeros last forever, plungers may need to be rebuilt in order to function properly.

I have one of each, and I prefer the vacumatic (plunger). But then, I bought it from someone who re-works them. The Parker 51 is a worthy choice in either style.

Gruder
06-16-2009, 02:30 PM
I have one of each, and I prefer the vacumatic (plunger). But then, I bought it from someone who re-works them. The Parker 51 is a worthy choice in either style.

Do you 51 lovers have any preference between American and British versions? What about the early aeros vs. the Mark IIIs?

Suzuki
06-16-2009, 04:31 PM
I'm not sure its fair to suggest a 51 as a possible option. I've never seen a 51 in good working order for the $30 price range that the OP indicated was what he was looking to spend. On the other hand, you can find lots of Parker 21 or Super 21 pens on e-bay (including NOS) that are well within this price range. While not as flashy or quite as smooth as the 51, the 21 (the Super in particular) are fantastic users - I picked up a NOS Super 21 for under $20 a few years ago and think its a great pen for the price.

Cheech
06-18-2009, 12:25 AM
I'm not sure its fair to suggest a 51 as a possible option. I've never seen a 51 in good working order for the $30 price range that the OP indicated was what he was looking to spend. On the other hand, you can find lots of Parker 21 or Super 21 pens on e-bay (including NOS) that are well within this price range. While not as flashy or quite as smooth as the 51, the 21 (the Super in particular) are fantastic users - I picked up a NOS Super 21 for under $20 a few years ago and think its a great pen for the price.

The 21 is a great pen. I have a few, and they really surprise me. Inexpensive, good, solid writers. Not quite as nice as the 51s, but what do you expect for a fraction of the cost?

And for the record: If you manage to avoid FPAD, they can be cheaper than disposable pens and better for the environment. I know a few people who always lost disposable pens, but never lose their fountain pens. (Notice I said lose; theft is another matter...) Also, do you know what the half-life is on the plastic used in disposable pens? I don't either, but it can't be good.

In terms of service life, SWMBO recently got (unfortunately) her grandfather's Mont Blanc. It was his daily user, and is now her "at home" user.

I've read a couple of people do analysis of cost. But, beyond cost, there are the intangibles. I know I have a problem writing more than a paragraph with a ball-point because my hand cramps. I don't have that problem with fountain pens.

And finally, personally, the #1 reason to use a fountain pen: The look on someone's face when they ask, "Hey, can I use your pen for a second?" and you say, "No. Not really."

Hmmm. Maybe I am a jerk...

Cheech
06-18-2009, 12:32 AM
BTW, if you haven't used a fountain pen in public before, at some point people will ask about it. Expect it. Its coming.

My favorite story is that, once, I was talking to an older woman. I was writing with my 51 and she comments, "Oh, you're a fountain pen man!" We then talked about the nature of our disposable society. Conversation starters are good. Especially when you enjoy them for their own sake.

Suzuki
06-18-2009, 03:41 AM
BTW, if you haven't used a fountain pen in public before, at some point people will ask about it. Expect it. Its coming.

My favorite story is that, once, I was talking to an older woman. I was writing with my 51 and she comments, "Oh, you're a fountain pen man!" We then talked about the nature of our disposable society. Conversation starters are good. Especially when you enjoy them for their own sake.

This is so true - I get comments all the time when I use one of my FPs in public - if you do run across another FP user, there's generally an immediate bond/discussion starter.

I also agree about FPs being easier to write with - with the exception of a couple of disposable pens with either liquid or gel ink, I can't write with anything but a FP for an extended period.

I have a bunch of FPs, including several higher end pens, while my favourites are my Pelikan 800, Lamy 200 and Waterman Carene, my humble Super 21 is often on my desk as its stiff, fine nib is great for margin notes.

DGS
06-23-2009, 07:11 AM
For about twice what you're willing to spend you can get a working Parker "51" which is 100 times the pen that you're looking at.

Doc.

+1 on the Parker 51. I have about 20 of these pens, in various colors, nib sizes and cap styles and love them all. Having collected fountain pens for many years (bpth vintge and modern, but mostly vintage), I can definitely say that vintage is the way to go if you really want a pen to WRITE with, rather than as a piece of jewelry or a conversation piece. Back in the day (i.e., before ballpoints), pens were made as utilitarian objects, and you'll find that the vintage pens, properly restored, write better than anything you can find today. Vintage pens are lighter, easier to write with, and most have real gold nibs, some of which are fleible and can give your handwriting a distinctive character, unlike modern, stiff nibs which write like nails. The Parker 51 is in my opinion the best fountain pen ever made, and there are zillions of them still around for reasonable prices. Try this site for more info: www.parker51.com Also, look at www.pentrace.net, which has both a message board and a sales board. The best place to find vintage pens is at a pen show, if you are near an area where one is being held. Here is a link to the major shows held in the U.S. each year: http://home.netcom.com/~swirth/2000.htm One of the best and biggest shows, with both vintage and modern pens, is the Washington, D.C. show, held each August. Here is a link to the D.C. Pen Show web site: http://www.pencentral.com/ There are hundreds of dealers and colelctors at these shows, and you can see and try out thousands of pens before you buy, as well as ask questions, try out inks, etc. There are numerous modern pen dealers and companies present as well, selling new pens at deep discounts. For example, I once bought an Omas Arco fountain pen, brand new, which would have run $850 in a pen store at the mall, for $425 at a pen show. I typically see discounts of 35-40&#37; at pen shows off new pens and related merchandise.

DGS
06-23-2009, 07:50 AM
Do you 51 lovers have any preference between American and British versions? What about the early aeros vs. the Mark IIIs?

I like both the U.S. and British versions. In my experience (and this is totally subjective), the British nibs seem to be a bit "softer" writing than the U.S. nibs. I prefer the earlier aerometrics (1949- early 1960s) to the later ones. They just seem to me to be more solidly built.

Moonraker5
06-25-2009, 02:31 PM
Go with the Lamy, good construction for the price. But the real bonus is that the nibs are interchangeable and you dont have to send it off to Lamy to change the nib. you can do it yourself.

I have various FP, i like my Cross also, but my Lamy i use daily and have a selection of nibs from xtra fine to medium. I find the medium too broad for my small writing, and the xtra fine tears the paper. So i find the fine nib best.

pal
06-25-2009, 03:24 PM
If you like a fine, controlled line and a cheap price I would suggest a Chinese pen. Their fine is like extra fine anywhere else. I own Cross, Parkers, Auroras, and I have to tell you my go to pen is a $5.00 Wing Sung. It doesn't use as much ink and the control is amazing. My handwriting improves 100% when I use it. If you like the look of the wrapped nib (ala Parker 51), you can buy a Hero 100 for about $25.00.

greyalien
06-27-2009, 11:54 AM
I know they are out of your initial price range, but I cannot recommend Sailor pens highly enough (to everyone). They write amazingly, their nibs are unequaled, and their style is pure class. The 14k nib models are a steal at about $150. I put their quality above other big names like MontBlanc and Pelikan. Could be the only nice pen you need for the rest of your life.

http://www.nibs.com/www/WEBSITE%20PICS/Sailor%20Pens/SapporoRhodiumCapped1.jpg

http://www.nibs.com/www/WEBSITE%20PICS/Sailor%20Pens/SapporoGoldNibDetail.jpg

https://www.artbrown.com/images/11-9201-250.jpg

And no, im not a salesman :biggrin:

I just love them so much its painful to write or sketch with anything else :lol:

pal
06-28-2009, 05:51 PM
I know they are out of your initial price range, but I cannot recommend Sailor pens highly enough (to everyone). They write amazingly, their nibs are unequaled, and their style is pure class. The 14k nib models are a steal at about $150. I put their quality above other big names like MontBlanc and Pelikan. Could be the only nice pen you need for the rest of your life.

http://www.nibs.com/www/WEBSITE%20PICS/Sailor%20Pens/SapporoRhodiumCapped1.jpg

http://www.nibs.com/www/WEBSITE%20PICS/Sailor%20Pens/SapporoGoldNibDetail.jpg

https://www.artbrown.com/images/11-9201-250.jpg

And no, im not a salesman :biggrin:

I just love them so much its painful to write or sketch with anything else :lol:

No salesman? O yes you are! And I don't blame you. My next pen is going to be a Snow White 1911. My son is going over to Japan to study for a year. I am going to have him check the pricing while he is there. Are you a member of FPN?

greyalien
06-28-2009, 10:59 PM
No salesman? O yes you are! And I don't blame you. My next pen is going to be a Snow White 1911. My son is going over to Japan to study for a year. I am going to have him check the pricing while he is there. Are you a member of FPN?

No, not an fpn member, just a guy in architecture school who has picked up a writing utensil or two and appreciates this kind of quality.

deeppurple
07-03-2009, 12:47 AM
This thread is very dangerous...

I already have a few Lamy Safaris and a Lamy 2000. Think I need a few samples in more classic styles...

Would it be OK to ask for some recommended dealers for Sailor pens and for the others mentioned (such as wing sung)?

Seems like a new AD is bubbling in the back of my mind...

DGS
07-03-2009, 06:57 AM
This thread is very dangerous...

I already have a few Lamy Safaris and a Lamy 2000. Think I need a few samples in more classic styles...

Would it be OK to ask for some recommended dealers for Sailor pens and for the others mentioned (such as wing sung)?

Seems like a new AD is bubbling in the back of my mind...

Don't know about Wing Sung, but try Pam Braun at Oscar Braun Pens for Sailor (and lots of other brands). She has the best prices of anyone I know, but can usually only quote you those prices over the phone. Here's her web site link: http://www.oscarbraunpens.com/

deeppurple
07-03-2009, 10:10 AM
Don't know about Wing Sung, but try Pam Braun at Oscar Braun Pens for Sailor (and lots of other brands). She has the best prices of anyone I know, but can usually only quote you those prices over the phone. Here's her web site link: http://www.oscarbraunpens.com/

Thank you very much!

Actually, Pam Braun seems to be very close to where I stay when I go to Detroit. I see a visit in the future.

DGS
07-03-2009, 11:41 AM
Thank you very much!

Actually, Pam Braun seems to be very close to where I stay when I go to Detroit. I see a visit in the future.

That can be dangerous for you. :wink: BTW, cash or check only, no credit cards.

deeppurple
07-03-2009, 04:17 PM
That can be dangerous for you. :wink: BTW, cash or check only, no credit cards.

Ah, thanks for the heads up. I think this may be a blessing...

Razor&Pens
07-03-2009, 05:25 PM
Would it be OK to ask for some recommended dealers for Sailor pens and for the others mentioned (such as wing sung)?

Seems like a new AD is bubbling in the back of my mind...

Ignore the Wing Sung, unless you're specifically looking for a cheapo with unremarkable writing quality.

Note that fountain pens are a heck of a lot more expensive to collect than are razors, although I do recommend that you have a couple of good ones with which you enjoy writing!

Pam Braun is great. There are plenty of other good dealers and repair folks too. I just recommended a Pelikan to another member here - actually, he brought the brand up, and as I was thinking of all the different characteristics one might consider in a pen I could think of no other good pen to recommend starting with. They are available in a wide price range; they are reliable and hold plenty of ink.

Tom

Cheech
07-03-2009, 06:38 PM
Note that fountain pens are a heck of a lot more expensive to collect than are razors, although I do recommend that you have a couple of good ones with which you enjoy writing!

In all fairness, you only shave once a day. You may spend an entire portion of your day writing. Granted, a fountain pen doesn't have the "man-factor" a razor does, but...

Maybe I'm trying to justify that 148 I just purchased. No, that couldn't be it... :rolleyes:

whiteweed
07-03-2009, 07:54 PM
Hey, sorry I was out for while but making some progress, getting my son ready for Philmont and he is at 28lbs dry and no food yet so he will be glad to see the top of Mt. Phillips. Just received my Parker 21 set, very good looking but missing eraser in pencil. I am getting ready to ink it up. Also picked up a ceap Hero just to get a start with. The Pelikan ink seems to have low viscosity ie wet. The printer in me has me thinking of an adjustment, but on good paper it is ok. Writing and shaving has become very difficult, old age and Mr. de Quervain's has caught up with me and the juice isn't working anymore. Anyway I am going to ink up the 21 and see what a vintage pen is like.

whiteweed
07-03-2009, 08:20 PM
The 21 is sweet, it's no Sailor but for the way I write it does not make any difference. I do love the nibs of the finer pens. Thanks to all who helped with the thread.

whitecrane7
07-13-2009, 03:14 PM
If you buy a cheap fountain pen, you will regret it. Best pens for the money are the Namiki/Pilots - they make great nibs.