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raven1
05-19-2009, 02:55 PM
I would like to dispose of my razors in the most environmentally friendly way possible while being safe.

Here are my questions:
(1) Many razor brands include a plastic container for safe disposal (such as feather or derby extra) but I don't like the fact that they are plastic since they can't decompose.
Does anyone know if you can recycle those plastic containers? (what type of plastic they are etc, and if that plastic is accepted by recycling stations).

(2) If I opt to not use those plastic containers - do you think it is safer to put the razors in a metal jar and throw it in the recycling bin or would it be safer to wrap the razors in paper and throw them out in regular trash?

Thanks for your tips.

wundergussy
05-19-2009, 03:00 PM
There is a thread going right now about this:
http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php?p=1208796#post1208796

raven1
05-19-2009, 11:17 PM
Thanks for the link.
Unfortunately it doesn't have anything about the main question I am after, which is if I can recycle the plastic cases many blades come in.
I think I have decided i'm just going to try some other brands that just come in cardboard boxes instead though.
Hoping maybe the Israeli Personna brand might be good enough for me since they seem to be well respected and use cardboard packaging.

It's a bummer though that feather and derby blades come in those plastic packages though.

raven1
05-19-2009, 11:48 PM
Hello barberofdeville,
I understand the safety issue just trying to find the best mix of both safety and environmentalism.

I was under the impression that hospitals don't recycle the plastic biohazard materials from another post qouted here:
"ps, i dont think they recycle the blades or anyting at the hospital, because for needles which is the majority of what theyre used for in the hospital system, the amount of steel vs plastic and processing dont add up, i think they just seal them off and throw them in the landfill"

Do you know if I buy one of those biohazard cases and bring them to the hospital, do they in general recycle the plastic and blades?

If they typically do recycle then that is what I will do without a question.
But if not then i'm not sure.
Maybe for example it would be best to put the blades in the cardboard boxes, and then throw those boxes into a metal container to throw them away.
That way it can still degrade but will take forever to do so. (and hopefully be well buried before anyone would be put at risk by the degrading process.

Anyways i'm not sure and welcome your feedback.
Thanks,
DK

Leche
05-19-2009, 11:53 PM
The red packs are awesome blades, try them, and I love the cardboard box. Get a can of broth, cut a slot in it, drain it and you have a blade bank. Decorate it any way you want. There is thread showing you how to do this step by step. In many years when it is full toss it into the recycle, you can even seal the slot.

raven1
05-20-2009, 12:57 AM
Thanks for the advice Leche :)
I'm looking into your suggestion.

Rudy Vey
05-20-2009, 04:03 AM
Some time ago someone posted a link and one would get a free bio hazards container (similar to the ones you see in doctor offices) for free from a pharmaceutical company - cannot recall the name. So I e-mailed them and got one a couple days later in the mail, it is kinda big, but I am also diabetic and have to get rid of the used testing lancets and strips daily, so I like this container. Now all my used blades go in there.

beaker
05-20-2009, 01:01 PM
I'm in the UK, and this is the position here - it may be different in the States.

Plastic blade dispenser boxes can go in your household plastic recycling - but only if they are empty (i.e. with no blades in them).

Razor blades and disposable razors cannot go in your household recycling - they go in your non-recyclable trash, and are landfilled.

A plastic sharps box could be used, but you would have to buy one, unless you have a medical need for one, e.g. diabetic or I.V. drug user. Disposal is then a problem as you cannot throw it in your trash, or recycle bin - it's classed as medical waste, and therefore incinerated.

So basically the plastic or card blade boxes can be recycled, blades cannot.

I did have one thought though. If you use a metal blade bank, when it is nearly full, add a load of salt to it and fill with water. Leave it for a couple of weeks before you toss it. By the time it hits the landfill, the blades inside will
be rusting nicely, thus speeding the bio-degrading process.

kingfisher
05-20-2009, 01:08 PM
(2) If I opt to not use those plastic containers - do you think it is safer to put the razors in a metal jar and throw it in the recycling bin or would it be safer to wrap the razors in paper and throw them out in regular trash?

.

Whatever you do don't wrap razors in paper and put in the regular trash. Please.


I put my used blades into a mini Altoids tin. When it is full, I plan on taping it completely shut so it can't accidentlally open, and then put it in the regular trash. Gives me an excuse to go get another can of mini Altoids, too.:001_smile

beaker
05-20-2009, 03:00 PM
Whatever you do don't wrap razors in paper and put in the regular trash.


That's exactly what we are asked to do over here!

_JP_
05-20-2009, 09:54 PM
Whatever you do don't wrap razors in paper and put in the regular trash. Please.



That's exactly what we are asked to do over here!

And there's nothing wrong with putting them in the regular trash (accept for the recycle angle). Razor blades are not the only sharp household items that wind up in the trash, there's also cans, broken glass, tacks, etc. The people who handle the trash expect that sort of stuff and are prepared for it.

If you really want to use some sort of container, there is this one that I saw in a hardware store, which is not a biohazard container.




http://www.labsafety.com/store/assets/product_images/lbw30379_02.jpg (http://www.labsafety.com/search/Stanley/24538986/?type=brand)

fidjit
05-20-2009, 10:48 PM
Disposal is then a problem as you cannot throw it in your trash, or recycle bin - it's classed as medical waste, and therefore incinerated.


Even down here in little old Tasmania, the Aids council has a disposal chute where you put your used sharps boxes and they supply you with a new one.

No I don't have Aids, but have a diabetic dog and a blood condition that sometimes requires sub cut injections, so we always have a sharps box around the house.

I'd be very suprised if other cities/state/countries don't have similar facilities......

You could also suss out diabetes organisations around the place if you're a bit embarrassed about the first one :001_smile

beaker
05-21-2009, 09:23 AM
I was under the impression that hospitals don't recycle the plastic biohazard materials from another post qouted here:
"ps, i dont think they recycle the blades or anyting at the hospital, because for needles which is the majority of what theyre used for in the hospital system, the amount of steel vs plastic and processing dont add up, i think they just seal them off and throw them in the landfill"

Do you know if I buy one of those biohazard cases and bring them to the hospital, do they in general recycle the plastic and blades?

Referring back to this, you are correct, the contents of plastic sharps boxes, or the boxes themselves are not recycled, but they are not landfilled either,they are incinerated. So this would mean you buying a sharps box (a new plastic product), filling it with blades, taking it to a collection point (possibly by car?) just to have it destroyed in a fuel guzzling incinerator. Ecologically this seems like the worst possible option, and is the "Problem with disposal" that I was talking about in my last post.

Razor blades are very thin, and will rust very quickly - even stainless ones. It wont take them very long to return to the earth, so disposing of them in your regular trash in an old can or Altoids box (well sealed) is probably the best option, even if it does not seem at first to be very environmentally friendly.:001_huh:

Citizen D
05-22-2009, 03:35 AM
Even down here in little old Tasmania, the Aids council has a disposal chute where you put your used sharps boxes and they supply you with a new one.

No I don't have Aids, but have a diabetic dog and a blood condition that sometimes requires sub cut injections, so we always have a sharps box around the house.

I'd be very suprised if other cities/state/countries don't have similar facilities......

You could also suss out diabetes organisations around the place if you're a bit embarrassed about the first one :001_smile

I actually inquired at my local council and was told to pick up a free sharps container and was also given instructions as to how to dispose of the full container. So you may want to check locally as to the preferred way to deal with used blades

Luc
05-22-2009, 04:47 AM
I actually inquired at my local council and was told to pick up a free sharps container and was also given instructions as to how to dispose of the full container. So you may want to check locally as to the preferred way to deal with used blades

Good to know, I will have to look into that when my tin is full!

gone down south
05-22-2009, 05:18 AM
I don't why you couldn't recycle blades, they're just small pieces of metal.

SepticTank
05-22-2009, 05:51 AM
I'm in the UK, and this is the position here - it may be different in the States.

Plastic blade dispenser boxes can go in your household plastic recycling - but only if they are empty (i.e. with no blades in them).

Razor blades and disposable razors cannot go in your household recycling - they go in your non-recyclable trash, and are landfilled.

Different again here and I'm in the UK too (for now) - they will happily take the plastic boxes (empty), the paper wrappers (clean) and SE/DE blades if they're made safe (after all they're just steel - so mine will go in a tin can when there's enough) - what they won't take are composites like cartridge blades.

Oh and a razor blade rusting isn't biodegrading - its corrosion - rust occurs naturally even in sterile environments if there's humidity and oxygen.

SRock
05-22-2009, 06:04 AM
Just because sharp objects end up there doesnt mean its right. Drug dealers sell drugs to children doesnt mean that its ok for me to do it. IMO That train of thought is why medical waste is and has been a problem in the USA

As far as the biodgradeable box(the explanation was well thought out and i stand corrected. Didnt think about it being put in the metal recycling box. Good point)

I agree with you. I think as razor blade users we should be responsible with their disposal.

twinklebull
04-16-2010, 09:47 PM
I'm in the UK, and this is the position here - it may be different in the States.

I did have one thought though. If you use a metal blade bank, when it is nearly full, add a load of salt to it and fill with water. Leave it for a couple of weeks before you toss it. By the time it hits the landfill, the blades inside will
be rusting nicely, thus speeding the bio-degrading process.

I just joined this forum in order to thank you all for sharing what you know about this tricky question, and to see if you can keep me from having to research something I probably learned (and forgot immediately) in high school.

I'm already saving up razor blades and any other sharps in a glass jar. I came here looking for a safe moral way to get them out of my house, and found -- rust!

If I can just put salt and water in that glass jar and wait, the blades will no longer be capable of doing any damage, and then I can toss them. Wonderful!

Now, here's my question: if I want to throw out some wet, salty RUST, that is, completely rusted blades, how long might I have to keep that jar?

Again, thank you all for your info and ideas.

Uncle Erik
04-17-2010, 01:16 AM
That's a great idea about the salt and water in the blade bank! I was about to toss the bank into the metal recycling, but I'll do that instead.

Omnichron
04-17-2010, 06:05 AM
I use a slimfast can for razor blade disposal. I is shiny and looks good on the shelf.:001_smile

Veritas II
04-17-2010, 10:27 AM
I use one of these from WSC:
http://westcoastshaving.com/images/bank_600.jpg

At $1 each they are very economical. They are metal, so tossing the whole thing into the recycling bin when it's full shouldn't be an issue. They are big enough to hold a lot of blades. I don't know how many because I haven't counted.

Stubblefield
04-17-2010, 03:06 PM
Referring back to this, you are correct, the contents of plastic sharps boxes, or the boxes themselves are not recycled, but they are not landfilled either,they are incinerated. So this would mean you buying a sharps box (a new plastic product), filling it with blades, taking it to a collection point (possibly by car?) just to have it destroyed in a fuel guzzling incinerator. Ecologically this seems like the worst possible option, and is the "Problem with disposal" that I was talking about in my last post.
I'd like to offer that incinerators are not the fuel guzzlers they are made out to be--that they are in many cases actually used to generate power and heat. The newer designs are quite environmentally friendly, and are seeing increased use in Europe, Denmark in particular. I know that some environmentalists like to vilify them, but they are not the bogeyman they are made out to be.

I put mine in a sharps container, which will be incinerated at some point.

BBrad
04-17-2010, 05:58 PM
Guys . . . I'm not trying to put anybody down here, but let's get real about the environmental issues surrounding our used razor blades.

The Number ONE hazard concerning blade disposal is to your family and yourself. If you just drop 'em in the rubbish, someone in your household (or even you) could be cut while rooting through the rubbish looking for the phone bill that you can't find or the toy soldier that belongs to your son . . . you know, the one your daughter threw away just to spite her older brother . . .

All blades that I dispose of are either contained in the back slot of the razor dispenser they were sold to me in, or wrapped in clear cellophane shipping tape to preclude their accidental contact with innocent fingers. (Used blades shipped with eBay razors by well-meaning but dumb sellers are also wrapped in cellophane tape. :cursing:)

There is no evidence that used razor blades will ever "come to life" in the rubbish, cross the kitchen floor, and attack us in our sleep. The only hazard comes with the possibility of humans sticking their mitts into the trash with their eyes closed and brains disconnected. (Situation: Normal??)

Do we obsess about the sharp edge on a tin can lid?? Are we running to the hospital bio-hazard incinerator with the lid from our last can of Pork & Beans??

Once tossed in the bin, our local rubbish is taken to the "Solid Waste Transfer/Disposal Facility" (formerly known as the Town Dump) where it is then transported to a state certified landfill. There, the blades are buried deep within the bowels of a sealed trench designed to keep rubbish "monsters" safely under control. Those blades, can lids, and other items made of similar ferric materials quickly revert to their former oxidized (read: rusted) state and become part of the earth . . . unable to attack innocent victims in any way . . . unless someone is prone to digging deep into the landfill trench, in which case they will get exactly what they deserve . . . :ohmy:

The minimal amount of un-recyclable (disposed) plastic used in blade dispensers is a small sacrifice to pay for the inherent safety that the dispensers provide for us . . . and it is nothing compared to the amount of lost plastic involved in the use of cartridge razors, which we have all sworn off from . . . :001_tt2:

While I firmly believe we have a responsibility (as good stewards of this earth that God has given us) to care for the environment, our personal and family safety trumps the recycling opportunity of a small bit of plastic ANY DAY!!

There is no need to go running willy-nilly like the robot from Lost in Space screaming "Danger, Will Robinson" about the bio-hazards involved with properly disposed-of used razor blades. Just make sure you and your family are safe . . . beyond that, NOBODY will ever touch them again!!!

So, screw the Sharps container, the trip to the hospital, the salt bath, the fear, and the "Al Gore" hysteria . . . just make sure your "in-house" disposal method precludes the accidental harm to you or your loved ones. Once the rubbish is tossed, it will never be touched by human hands again!!

(OK, time to take my medicine . . .)

Geordon
04-17-2010, 06:22 PM
There is no evidence that used razor blades will ever "come to life" in the rubbish, cross the kitchen floor, and attack us in our sleep. The only hazard comes with the possibility of humans sticking their mitts into the trash with their eyes closed and brains disconnected. (Situation: Normal??)


Let me guess, you don't use Feather blades, do you? Those buggers are like Daleks! They seek to exterminate all humanity!

I kid. :001_tt2:

WinstonSmith
04-17-2010, 06:56 PM
I keep a white metal blade bank as above in the bathroom, and I have a beer can with a slit cut in the side on the workbench for utility knife blades and whatnot.

When either gets nearly full, I'll wrap it up in duct tape and toss it in with the cans. Metals generally get shredded mechanically for recycling. They'll be fine.

nicolasedelbach
04-18-2010, 02:23 AM
I use one of these from WSC:
http://westcoastshaving.com/images/bank_600.jpg

At $1 each they are very economical. They are metal, so tossing the whole thing into the recycling bin when it's full shouldn't be an issue. They are big enough to hold a lot of blades. I don't know how many because I haven't counted.

I've asked before on other threads and never got an answer. Does anyone know the dimensions of these? Or at least a rough guess on how many razors they hold?

I guess i should just order one when I buy something from westcoastshaving.com to find out. Right now I'm using a soda can with a slit to store blades, but I'd rather have something that didn't look so innocent.

Unknownsoldier
04-18-2010, 07:16 AM
I'm in the UK, and this is the position here - it may be different in the States.

Plastic blade dispenser boxes can go in your household plastic recycling - but only if they are empty (i.e. with no blades in them).

Razor blades and disposable razors cannot go in your household recycling - they go in your non-recyclable trash, and are landfilled.

A plastic sharps box could be used, but you would have to buy one, unless you have a medical need for one, e.g. diabetic or I.V. drug user. Disposal is then a problem as you cannot throw it in your trash, or recycle bin - it's classed as medical waste, and therefore incinerated.

So basically the plastic or card blade boxes can be recycled, blades cannot.

I did have one thought though. If you use a metal blade bank, when it is nearly full, add a load of salt to it and fill with water. Leave it for a couple of weeks before you toss it. By the time it hits the landfill, the blades inside will
be rusting nicely, thus speeding the bio-degrading process.

I just throw mine in the local recycling depots metal container (lumps of scrap steel etc. etc.) in a metal tin, (well the once I've had to do it.... :D LOL), guy said the stuff in there was razor shap anyways.... it all gets sorted with magnets then, melted, very little manual touching by people now...

Tom