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View Full Version : Who were "really" the fastest guns in hollywood?



joseywales
01-01-2009, 07:08 PM
I saw the post below about Clint - still not sure who he is, but I thought I'd put up some hollywood trivia. Van Cleef always claimed that he was actually faster than Clint when drawing a sixgun, which was most likely true. However, there were two other actors who were among the fastest hollywood draws and neither are what you'd consider "tough guys".

Care to guess? Google is CHEATING

arghblech
01-01-2009, 07:21 PM
Gene Wilder?!
Elvira Mistress of the Dark?!

Peppery John
01-01-2009, 07:32 PM
Jay Silverheels

joseywales
01-01-2009, 07:48 PM
Gene was pretty close.

Sammy Davis Jr was reportedly the second fastest gun in Hollywood. Second only to Jerry Lewis.

A quote from Samm'ys Bio:

According to the "Fastest Gun Who Ever Lived," Bob Munden, Davis was the second-fastest draw in Hollywood, trailing only Jerry Lewis. Davis presented Munden with a customized Colt Peacemaker in recognition of Munden's skill after they appeared together on "The Mike Douglas Show" (1961).

slcsteve
01-01-2009, 07:52 PM
Glenn Ford was reputed to have the fastest draw.


Of course there was Quick Draw McGraw but he wasn't always technically correct.

http://www.alexross.com/quickdraw.jpg

whodat
01-01-2009, 10:11 PM
I saw the post below about Clint - still not sure who he is, but I thought I'd put up some hollywood trivia. Van Cleef always claimed that he was actually faster than Clint when drawing a sixgun, which was most likely true. However, there were two other actors who were among the fastest hollywood draws and neither are what you'd consider "tough guys".

Care to guess? Google is CHEATING

Man, I needed google just to figure out who you were talking about... :)

john.crissman
01-01-2009, 10:14 PM
Norma Jean Baker had the fastest guns in Hollywood.

rtaylor61
01-01-2009, 10:47 PM
Norma Jean Baker had the fastest guns in Hollywood.

No. Just the "best chest in the west".

Randy

OldSaw
01-01-2009, 11:08 PM
Little Neddy Nederlander

joscobo
01-01-2009, 11:17 PM
Sammy Davis Jr. was one I don't recall the other. Kirk Douglas comes to mind.

joseywales
01-02-2009, 05:55 AM
Sammy Davis Jr. was one I don't recall the other. Kirk Douglas comes to mind.


Sammy was #2. See my second post above. It looks as though Jerry Lewis was #1.

tortswon
01-02-2009, 06:09 AM
Since Wyatt Earp (the real one) worked in Hollywood after he retired from being US Marshall. I suspect he could lay claim to this title. He lived in California from 1890 until his death and befriended a number of stars including William S. Hart and Tom Mix who were pallbearers at his funeral as well as a then unknown John Wayne. Best, Sam

Austin
01-02-2009, 06:18 AM
Alan Ladd (Shane)

joseywales
01-03-2009, 09:05 AM
Since Wyatt Earp (the real one) worked in Hollywood after he retired from being US Marshall. I suspect he could lay claim to this title. He lived in California from 1890 until his death and befriended a number of stars including William S. Hart and Tom Mix who were pallbearers at his funeral as well as a then unknown John Wayne. Best, Sam

Not likely that Wyatt was the fastest. Wyatt's famous quote pointed to the fact that accuracy was for more important than speed, which he did not have. "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." And he was correct :biggrin:

Jerry Lewis was the fastes, with Sammy Davis JR running a close second. At least, according to Bob Munden.

Kit Walker
01-03-2009, 11:20 PM
Audie Murphy would have blown Wyatt away in a hollywood-style quick draw shootout, just as he would have any of the fast draw actors. Not only was he in the same league with them for speed, he was WILLING. Wyatt Earp was never a noted gunman in his own time, Stuart Lake notwithstanding. IIRC, the shootout at the OK Corral was his first time out, and the rest of his shootouts were ambushes and executions.

Actually, the fastest man with a gun to appear on film was likely Arvo Ajalo, most noted as the guy who taught most of the actors how to handle a sixgun, although he appeared in speaking roles now and then.

john.crissman
01-05-2009, 07:48 AM
So, can we get a validation on the fastest?

Kit Walker
01-05-2009, 11:02 AM
So, can we get a validation on the fastest?

It all depends upon who you are talking to, what era that you are discussing, and the particular rules under which the competition was staged. Munsen's claim was probably correct -- in the early 1960's. However, the equipment and techniques improved markedly after that, and the rules changed. In the early 60's, all that was measured was the time required to fire the weapon (the fabled fast noise). Since then the rules have changed to where you have to hit a target to stop the clock.

Roman414
01-05-2009, 12:02 PM
Hollywood is one thing, real life is another. Wild Bill Hickock dropped an opponent, Davis Tutt, with a single shot through the heart at 75 yards. While Tutt was standing in dueling position, shooting at him. I would consider that a pretty good at 25 yards, but at 75 yds when he is shooting at you too...!!

D.Irving79
01-05-2009, 03:23 PM
bugsy seagel ?

spinyeel
01-06-2009, 12:38 AM
Wyatt Earp was certainly the fastest pistol whipper. A method he specialised in apparently.:smile::smile:

Roman414
01-06-2009, 01:40 PM
As did Bat Masterson also. John Wesley Hardin may have been the biggest psychopath. He shot a man for snoring. And in later life became a lawyer. Damn!

theperfectstorm
01-06-2009, 02:53 PM
On film anyway Glenn Ford was freakishly quick.

I am not surprised about Sammy because (a. he was good at everything and (b. I saw him on Wild Wild West standing mano-a-mano with the great Robert Conrad and he did not come off as a lesser man.

The only one I would be afraid of was Audie Murphy--experience counts for a whole lot.

texcattlerancher
01-06-2009, 03:03 PM
What objective standard, if any, was used to determine draw speed?

joseywales
01-06-2009, 03:48 PM
What objective standard, if any, was used to determine draw speed?

Not sure. Bob Munden was highly respected, though I'm sure his opinion was limited to those he witnessed.

neverleft
05-22-2012, 06:46 PM
Saw a ranking once and Audie Murphy was #1, Sammy Davis Jr. #2, Glen Ford #3, Ken Curtis (Festus) #4 and Lee Van Cleef was #5.

An interesting side note was John Wayne had so much trouble learning to use a single action in his early movies that he used a special made double action for shoot outs when he could not use a stand in.

malocchio
05-22-2012, 06:57 PM
hop-a-long cassidy !

WesternModern
05-22-2012, 07:01 PM
Second only to Jerry Lewis.




Hey lady! LADY!! Draw!

Legion
05-22-2012, 07:09 PM
There is a big difference between drawing fast, and drawing fast and being able to hit your target.

Google FBI agent Jelly Bryce. Nothing to do with Hollywood, but he was the real deal.

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x146/dh10au/bryce.jpg

" Delf Bryce could drop a silver dollar, as shown in the picture, and he could draw and fire before the coin passed the gun which was at waist level. Bryce was one of those incredibly and naturally skilled men who could point shoot and hit everything they aimed at."

jlanger
05-22-2012, 09:15 PM
Hollywood is one thing, real life is another. Wild Bill Hickock dropped an opponent, Davis Tutt, with a single shot through the heart at 75 yards. While Tutt was standing in dueling position, shooting at him. I would consider that a pretty good at 25 yards, but at 75 yds when he is shooting at you too...!!

with a pretty darn old (even for the time) pistol nonetheless.

jlanger
05-22-2012, 09:17 PM
Wyatt Earp was certainly the fastest pistol whipper. A method he specialised in apparently.:smile::smile:

He was pretty famous for just walking men down. Takes a little bit of guts to do that while they have a loaded gun pointed at you.

slugg77
05-22-2012, 10:18 PM
Little Neddy Nederlander

Came to the thread expecting this, left satisfied.

The Count of Merkur Cristo
05-23-2012, 12:59 PM
Do Spagehetti Westerns like Terence Hill in "Trinity Is Still My Name" count? http://www.pasoti.co.uk/talk/images/smilies/smiley_laughing.gif


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTmVLHXn3H4

http://www.smileyvault.com/albums/merv/qdraw.gif "Like to see that again? It's hard to catch the first time". Terence Hill in "Trinity Is Still My Name"

knlgskr
05-23-2012, 01:53 PM
There is a big difference between drawing fast, and drawing fast and being able to hit your target.

Google FBI agent Jelly Bryce. Nothing to do with Hollywood, but he was the real deal.

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x146/dh10au/bryce.jpg

" Delf Bryce could drop a silver dollar, as shown in the picture, and he could draw and fire before the coin passed the gun which was at waist level. Bryce was one of those incredibly and naturally skilled men who could point shoot and hit everything they aimed at."

I lived in Oklahoma City 1971-73 and got aqcquainted with him, he was in his 60s at that time and I wouldn't have wanted to have tried my luck with him; he was both fast and accurate. Bill Jordan, Harry Reeves, Jeff Cooper, Thell Reed, Ed McGivern, Charles Adkins Jr., Larry Lalouette, Jerry Miculek are/were others I have met/seen who were worthy contemporaries/peers of him. He, Charles Adkins Jr., Bill Jordan were some of if not the best at shooting others who were also shooting at them and Mr. Bryce may have been the best of all; a fine man as well as a fine lawman.

oc_in_fw
05-23-2012, 04:42 PM
No. Just the "best chest in the west".

Randy
Nah, that would have gone to Jayne Mansfield or Jane Russell.

Doc4
05-24-2012, 03:05 PM
Nah, that would have gone to Jayne Mansfield or Jane Russell.

No shortage of judges, anyhow.

Phog Allen
05-24-2012, 04:01 PM
Good thread. I am unsure of Audie Murphy(my Da actually met him once) or old Sammy but Glenn Ford was the real deal. I have subscribed to various firearms publications for decades and have seen numerous articles about Ford's abilities with handguns. And not movie prop squib loads either. Full load for cablibre ammunition. He was very fast.

If you are interested in this sort of thing look up Bill Jordan, Thell Reed, Ed McGivern, and another from the 70's who's name escapes me at the moment. Guns and Ammo had a time lapse photo sequence in which the chap split a playing card on edge. AFTER if was thrown in the air. This was will full load commercial ammo. I cannot fathom the hand to eye coordination it took to hit the edge of the flying playing card. Let alone how he anticipated the movement a fraction of a second before the shot was let off. Amazing.

Cheers, Todd