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TimmyBoston
01-23-2007, 03:42 AM
There is a very large amount of avid readers on this board, very many of us thirst for knowledge.

What book or books are you reading right now? What are you finding stimulating? What would you recommend to others?

TimmyBoston
01-23-2007, 03:51 AM
Right now, I'm about about 5/6 of the way through The Promise by Chaim Potok. I've been on it for a couple months, but a day or two I decided I needed to finish it and have really buckled down and finished the majority of the book. This novel is the sequel to The Chosen and is an excellent novel (as is The Chosen). I highly recommend it, both for the religious debate and the interpersonal relationships and psychological. Reading The Chosen first is not neccesary but it helps.

I've also made a New Years Resolution to read the entire Bible, actually I made it about a week ago, but that's close enough to New Years, right? I'm still in Genesis, but I'm really enjoying spending a few minutes with my Bible everyday. I've also began an individual Bible Study of the book of Proverbs, covering and studying a chapter a day. The amount of wisdom in that book is astounding. Highly beneficial for one of any faith.

Finally, I began James Dobson's What Wives Wish Their Husbands Knew About Women, a non-fiction Christian and Psychological book on marriage (in addition to his religious teachings Dobson is a clinical psychologist). Hopefully the insights I'm learning now will serve me well in the next year or two when I do settle down. I was thrown by the title, but the book actually seems to be intended for women rather than men, but I've found the insights to be just a poignant to a male seeking to better connect with his partner and strengthen the relationship.

Porcine
01-23-2007, 06:14 AM
Just finishing an interesting pop history of radio: SOMETHING IN THE AIR: RADIO, ROCK, AND THE REVOLUTION THAT SHAPED A GENERATION, by Marc Fisher of the Washington Post

For a real hoot (make sure you pee before you read this one) THE REAL ANIMAL HOUSE, by Chris Miller (one of the three writers of the original movie script, and the inspiration for the character, Pinto)

On the series side: Going Down Jericho Road, by Michael Honey, Ph.D., a compelling account of the Memphis sanitation workers strike (1968), at which Martin Luther King was murdered.

Happy booking!
Porcine

Dennis
01-23-2007, 06:25 AM
I am a simultaneous reader - I think I have about 6 or 7 books going right now.

Just finished: Perfume - The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind. Outstanding.

Included in the current works:
Omnivore's Dilemna - Michael Pollen
Shalimar the Clown - Salman Rushdie
The Art of Eating - MFK Fisher
You Shall Know Our Velocity - David Eggers

Plus a couple misc others.

Dennis

LX_Emergency
01-23-2007, 06:27 AM
Reading: The Science of Discworld III: Darwin's Watch by Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen right now.

Very VERY interesting. If you're into religion and/or science at all you'll enjoy this book.

TimmyBoston
01-23-2007, 06:28 AM
I am a simultaneous reader - I think I have about 6 or 7 books going right now.

Just finished: Perfume - The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind. Outstanding.



I have not read Perfume, but I was reading about it the other day. From the description I read, the description of fragrances (in the book) are absolutely breathtaking.

Argus
01-23-2007, 06:31 AM
Just finished Next by Michael Cricthon, and currently reading Hannibal Rising by Thomas Harris.


_____
Sean

PR22
01-23-2007, 06:33 AM
I just started reading Ulysses by James Joyce, this is going to take a while to finish as I'm only reading this on days that I do cardio (3x a week).

Dennis
01-23-2007, 06:45 AM
I have not read Perfume, but I was reading about it the other day. From the description I read, the description of fragrances (in the book) are absolutely breathtaking.

Indeed - I have not read a book anything like it. The author's ability to bring the reader, vividly, into a world of smells was unparalleled. You cannot help but recall the scents and odors as he describes them and it just added an entire other level to the book, plus it is a good story.

Dennis

Dennis
01-23-2007, 06:46 AM
I just started reading Ulysses by James Joyce, this is going to take a while to finish as I'm only reading this on days that I do cardio (3x a week).

Good luck with that...:biggrin: (the book I mean - stream of conciousness writing is not my thing at all).

fatpig
01-23-2007, 07:05 AM
Currently reading
Med ship by Murray Leinster , previously i went trough the Solar Queen series by Andre Norton. I like older science fiction but i am quite omnivore about books.

fuerein
01-23-2007, 07:13 AM
Right now, I'm about about 5/6 of the way through The Promise by Chaim Potok. I've been on it for a couple months, but a day or two I decided I needed to finish it and have really buckled down and finished the majority of the book. This novel is the sequel to The Chosen and is an excellent novel (as is The Chosen). I highly recommend it, both for the religious debate and the interpersonal relationships and psychological. Reading The Chosen first is not neccesary but it helps.

Read The Chosen in Lit class in HS, as well as watched the movie adaptation. I thought the book was really good (I was probably the only one in my class to think so), but I read The Promise several years later when I came across it at the library in my hometown. Both are good.

Last thing I was reading was Sherlock Holmes, but that was during vacation several months ago and I have a hard time reading after work because my eyes are normally tired after staring at text all day as part of my job. I wish I could read more after work, but it is just so uncomfortable.

ouch
01-23-2007, 07:17 AM
Right now, I'm reading B&B.

bababoosky
01-23-2007, 07:19 AM
I just finished reading the latest James Patterson - Cross and Ted Bell's - Spy. Ted Bell's books are very James Bond-ish, excellent reading.

allmodcons
01-23-2007, 07:24 AM
Waiting on the Weather:Making Movies with Akira Kurosawa-Teruyo Nogami

Taiko-Eiji Yashikawa

And for the better part of a year I've been plowing through History of Japan to 1334 by George Sansom.

Straight Arrow
01-23-2007, 07:25 AM
I'm reading The Bathroom Reader. Stop laughing.

Ironman
01-23-2007, 07:30 AM
I'm about a third of the way through "Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln" by Doris Kerns Goodwin.

A facinating look at how political campaigns were run in the mid-19th century.

Ltltony
01-23-2007, 07:45 AM
Right now, I'm about about 5/6 of the way through The Promise by Chaim Potok. I've been on it for a couple months, but a day or two I decided I needed to finish it and have really buckled down and finished the majority of the book. This novel is the sequel to The Chosen and is an excellent novel (as is The Chosen). I highly recommend it, both for the religious debate and the interpersonal relationships and psychological. Reading The Chosen first is not neccesary but it helps.

I've also made a New Years Resolution to read the entire Bible, actually I made it about a week ago, but that's close enough to New Years, right? I'm still in Genesis, but I'm really enjoying spending a few minutes with my Bible everyday. I've also began an individual Bible Study of the book of Proverbs, covering and studying a chapter a day. The amount of wisdom in that book is astounding. Highly beneficial for one of any faith.

Finally, I began James Dobson's What Wives Wish Their Husbands Knew About Women, a non-fiction Christian and Psychological book on marriage (in addition to his religious teachings Dobson is a clinical psychologist). Hopefully the insights I'm learning now will serve me well in the next year or two when I do settle down. I was thrown by the title, but the book actually seems to be intended for women rather than men, but I've found the insights to be just a poignant to a male seeking to better connect with his partner and strengthen the relationship.

Chaim Potok is great. I really like The Chosen. You should check out the film, they did a pretty good job with it.

Bob Dobbs
01-23-2007, 07:48 AM
Great Thread!:thumbup1:

I just finished "Stardust" by Neil Gaiman. Today I'll start "Black" by Ted Dekker.

Ltltony
01-23-2007, 08:02 AM
I forgot to list what I'm reading.

Remaking the World: Adventures in Engineering by Henry Petroski

God in Search of Man by Abraham Joshua Heschel

And a huge stack of book waiting to be read as I got ~10 books for Christmas.

I have also been reading a little Sherlock Holmes spattered throughout my normal reading.

kozulich
01-23-2007, 08:29 AM
Good stuff Tim. My wife also decided to read through the bible this year for the first time cover to cover. I think she's in Exodus now. She want's to be ahead of schedule by the time summer comes around, since her desire to read declines then.

Personally, I've been on 2 kicks lately. Just came off a CS Lewis kick. I read "Miracles" and "Letters to Malcolm".

Now I'm on a bit of a fantasy kick. Have 3 series going.
Just finished "Eragon" by Christopher Paolini, and am waiting for "Eldest" to come out in Paperback.
Also recently finished the first 2 books in the cradleland trilogy by Douglas Hirt - "Return to Eden", and "Quest for Atlan". Ready to start "Fall of the Nephilim".
Yesterday I finished "Maire", book one in the Fires of Gleanmarra series by Linda Windsor.

PalmettoB
01-23-2007, 08:44 AM
The Rising Tide by Jeff Shaara. The first of a trilogy about the Second World War (historical fiction at its finest!)

Before that? The Shapeshifter by Tony Hillerman.

netsurfr
01-23-2007, 08:48 AM
You all may laugh at my leisure reading. I spend so much time doing technical reading that I tend to go 180 degrees in the other direction when given a chance. I am currently reading "Black Wind" by Clive Cussler. Just finished up a novel by Robert Ludlum... Amber Warning or something like that.
Steve

jnich67
01-23-2007, 09:18 AM
The Second World War: Vol. 1 by Winston Churchill. Interesting perspective.

Jordan

JBHoren
01-23-2007, 10:27 AM
In the crapper, I'm reading (albeit, slowly) John Irving's "Until I Find You".

At the kitchen table I'm alternating between Ben Bova's "The Green Trap", James Rollins' "Black Order", and Greg Bear's "Slant".

I confess to being a sci-fi devotee, but have a real problem with the multi-dimensional, multi-volume, fantasy worlds of more recent sci-fi. James Blish's tetralogy "Cities in Flight" was great, and bears re-reading; ditto for Asimov's "Robot" series.

Jeffrey Deaver's novels have captured my attention these past few years, as have those of Richard Morgan: "Altered Carbon", "Market Forces", and others. Perhaps most enjoyable have been the novels of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child: "Relic", "Reliquary", and more. With all of them, I highly recommend reading them in chronological order.

As for non-fiction; well, 25 years of computer science and other aspects of engineering have taken their toll. As a young man, I read more than my fair share of Landmark Books' biographies -- Winston Churchill, Teddy Roosevelt, and many more; now I shy away from what's become little more than one more incarnation of "The Cult of Personality". I think it came to a head back in 1999, when I took my 5th-grade stepson to the Public Library to look for a biography (he needed to write a book report), and the shelves were filled with ersatz-biographies of Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, and other "greats". Try as I may, I couldn't find a single one about Frank Gifford, Vince Lombardi, Joe Namath (OK, his was pretty racy stuff), Johnny Unitas, or any of the others. Even JFK's "Profiles in Courage" wasn't even listed in the catalog.

Do "Cliff's Notes" and/or "Monarch Study Guides" count? Actually, I did read some non-fiction recently -- the instruction booklet for the 2006 1040A Federal Income Tax Form. :wink:

wa_bacchus
01-23-2007, 10:39 AM
Reading two freely available books in PDF format:
* The Awakening by Kate Chopin. PDF (http://www.bosonbooks.com/boson/oldies/Awakening.pdf)
* Geek Mafia by Rick Dakan. PDF (http://rickdakan.com/archives/Geek%20Mafia%20E-Book.pdf)

Awaiting the arrival of:
* Hannibal Rising (http://www.amazon.com/Hannibal-Rising-Thomas-Harris/dp/0385339410) by Thomas Harris.. (please read Hannibal and Hannibal Rising instead of seeing the horrible movie adaptation.. Harris has a way with visual descriptions...)

Just finished:
Blindsight by Peter Watts. PDF (http://www.rifters.com/real/shorts/PeterWatts_Blindsight.pdf) 2 stars [out of 5]

SA_bmatth
01-23-2007, 01:36 PM
I Will Bear Witness: 1933-1941 by Victor Klemperer

Since JB broke the taboo...for the crapper I have both the Straight Dope series(original, return, triumph) and the Oxford Book of (Congressional, Military) Anecdotes.

TimmyBoston
01-23-2007, 08:54 PM
Just came off a CS Lewis kick. I read "Miracles" and "Letters to Malcolm".


I forgot, I'm also reading "The Problem of Pain" by Lewis. I really love Lewis's writing, but I find that I can't just read it, I have study it. He is truly one brilliant man.

MacArthur Mike
01-23-2007, 09:09 PM
Just finished "All the King's Men" by Robert Penn Warren about an hour ago. I am also reading "Heat: An Amateur's Adventures as Ktichen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker, and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany" by Bill Buford. Hillarious book and a great read especially if you love the kitchen and want an inside look at the lifestyle of famous chefs...Mr. Buford became friends with Mario Batali while writing this book and some of the stories he tells about him gives a whole new meaning to the work gluttony.

TimmyBoston
01-23-2007, 09:18 PM
Okay, I finished The Promise last night. Any suggestions on what to start next? I'm looking for another novel.

I'm glad everyone is liking this thread. I know they are so many people here who are so much smarter than I, I'm glad to have the opportunity to step into your libraries and find some new books both for entertainment and enlightment. Thansk all!

Bricktop
01-24-2007, 04:06 AM
The last book I read was last summer, and so the stack is building. :redface:
It was "In Cold Blood", by Truman Capote. You don't need me to tell you it was great.
It's getting about time for me to re-read "Knock on Any Door", by Willard Motley.
I have read that about every 5 years since I was a teenager. That may be my favorite book ever.

Woknblues
01-24-2007, 04:57 AM
Journey to Kars by Phillip Glazebrook. Just started, can't comment on it.

I last read Weil's 8 weeks to Optimum Health. A bit predictable, but it seems to be doable. (get it from the liabrary, don't buy it)

My free reading has taken a hit this year. I read most of the Terry Goodkind series, "The Sword of Truth" last year, loved the first couple of books, but I can't seem to finish the last two books. Waaay to repetitive. I was interested a while ago in an author a friend talked about that did "fiction historical" books during the time of WW2. Can anyone help me? (not to hijack your thread):001_unsur

rikrdo
01-24-2007, 05:22 AM
Golf Digest
Pipes and Tobaccos Magazine
Esquire
Sunset
Book Of Romans

joe_w
01-24-2007, 12:23 PM
I just finished the "His Dark Materials" trilogy by Philip Pullman. There's a big movie version coming out next December. It started out a little slow but by the middle of the second book I was hooked and by the end it was one of the best books I've read in years. Highly, highly recommended.

Joe

kozulich
01-24-2007, 12:49 PM
I forgot, I'm also reading "The Problem of Pain" by Lewis. I really love Lewis's writing, but I find that I can't just read it, I have study it. He is truly one brilliant man.

Yup:yesnod:

JBHoren
01-24-2007, 04:08 PM
I forgot, I'm also reading "The Problem of Pain" by Lewis. I really love Lewis's writing, but I find that I can't just read it, I have study it. He is truly one brilliant man.

My tattoo artist keeps "The Problem of Pain" prominently displayed in his work booth...

When people ask him (regarding tattoos) "Doesn't it hurt?" He always replies, "Doesn't hurt me a bit!"

Lyrt
01-24-2007, 04:15 PM
I just wanted to add exostim to this thread. I'm reading Contes Cruels by Jean-Marie-Mathias-Philippe-Auguste de Villiers de L'Isle-Adam.

Mama Bear
01-24-2007, 04:27 PM
I just finished reading 'The Alchemist' by Paulo Coelho. It is a short book (155 pages) who's writing reminds me of 'Jonathon Livingston Seagul' in many ways, but it seems more appropriate to these days and times. It has reminded me that we need to follow our dreams and listen to our hearts.

I am going to go and buy the other books Mr. Coelho has written now. Once in a while I finish a book and am compelled to just hold it for a while afterwards in my hands. This was one of them.

under a mountain
01-24-2007, 04:37 PM
Just about to start 'The Creature from Jekyll Island : A Second Look at the Federal Reserve' :confused:

I'll let you all know how it goes.:eek:

Actually I hear the book reads like a thriller.

JBHoren
01-24-2007, 08:15 PM
I've also made a New Years Resolution to read the entire Bible, actually I made it about a week ago, but that's close enough to New Years, right? I'm still in Genesis, but I'm really enjoying spending a few minutes with my Bible everyday. I've also began an individual Bible Study of the book of Proverbs, covering and studying a chapter a day. The amount of wisdom in that book is astounding. Highly beneficial for one of any faith.

Tim, you have absolutely no idea how much of the TaNaCh -- Hebrew acronym for Torah (the Bible), N'vi'im (Prophets), and Ketuvim (Writings) -- is mistranslated from the original Hebrew into English (via Greek and/or Latin), as well as misunderstood/misinterpreted, because the age-old commentaries which accompany Jewish copies of the TaNaCh are missing from the English translations.

Most Jews don't read, speak, or understand Hebrew; and only an infinitesimally-small number of non-Jews (mainly Messianic Christians) take the time to learn Hebrew, in order to read the Bible (and the rest) in it's original language.

If you do want to read excellent translations from the original Hebrew into English, I heartily recommend the wealth of books which are available from Artscroll Publishers (here in the US, in bookstores and via the Internet). Notably, these versions do contain many of the major commentaries on key passages -- you'll see the difference, as well as learn and appreciate it that much more.

TimmyBoston
01-24-2007, 09:58 PM
Tim, you have absolutely no idea how much of the TaNaCh -- Hebrew acronym for Torah (the Bible), N'vi'im (Prophets), and Ketuvim (Writings) -- is mistranslated from the original Hebrew into English (via Greek and/or Latin), as well as misunderstood/misinterpreted, because the age-old commentaries which accompany Jewish copies of the TaNaCh are missing from the English translations.

Most Jews don't read, speak, or understand Hebrew; and only an infinitesimally-small number of non-Jews (mainly Messianic Christians) take the time to learn Hebrew, in order to read the Bible (and the rest) in it's original language.

If you do want to read excellent translations from the original Hebrew into English, I heartily recommend the wealth of books which are available from Artscroll Publishers (here in the US, in bookstores and via the Internet). Notably, these versions do contain many of the major commentaries on key passages -- you'll see the difference, as well as learn and appreciate it that much more.

I'm not Jewish but I have a lot of repsect for Jewish scholarship and study. Actually I just ordered a basic book on Talmud, "Swimming in the Sea of Talmud" which was recommended to me by our own Rav Eric. I also ordered "Torah and Company". But thanks for the suggestions, they are greatly appreciated. I have seriously given thought to trying to learn Hebrew, I too think that you can get so much more out of the text from it's original language.

But in the meantime, I'm off to Amazon to check out those books, thanks so much. :smile:

TimmyBoston
01-25-2007, 04:14 AM
Yesterday, I began reading Mike Gayle's My Legendary Girlfriend. I bought the book a while ago and finally decided to start it last night and finished it around 24 hrs later. It was an odd experience for me, part of me really didn't like the book, or rather the protagonist (the book was a very good read as evidenced that I couldn't put it down) I read reviews of the book where it was categorized as male chick lit. The protagonist, a London Schoolteacher, still, pining over his ex 3 years later, was whiny at times very annoying as he cries and dreams about a woman I certainly wouldn't have wanted, and I thought he needed a swift kick in the pants, but his character was also very endearing. The books follows him over a single weekend as he looks for love, it's meaning and tries to reclaim his life. I really enjoyed it, even if I didn't always agree with it.

I, then started An Open Heart by The Dalai Lama. It seems to and I hope it continues to show some wonderful insights written by a very thoughtful and wise man.

Now I have to find another novel to begin. :confused: :biggrin: :w00t:

TimmyBoston
01-31-2007, 07:19 PM
Mario Puzo's The Godfather, I've seen the movie a dozen times, but never read the book, it's outstanding, what a wonderful book.

scorpion
01-31-2007, 07:28 PM
Mario Puzo's The Godfather, I've seen the movie a dozen times, but never read the book, it's outstanding, what a wonderful book.


That's a fantastic book. I read it years ago.

My latest books are The Rise and Fall of Long Term Capital Management and several books about mountaineering.

Doc4
01-31-2007, 07:51 PM
I Will Bear Witness: 1933-1941 by Victor Klemperer.

I am curious ... is Victor related to the conductor Otto Klemperer? I wouldn't be suprised as it's a very rare name!

And yes, Werner Klemperer of "Col Klink" fame is Otto's son. :w00t:

TightLines
01-31-2007, 08:29 PM
Just finished David Baldacci's "the Camel Club" and am starting "The Collectors." He like's putting all the alphabet agencies (FBI, DEA, NSA, CIA, DOD, DOJ) in collution and conspiracies.:cool:

wcbaker
01-31-2007, 08:36 PM
I've been reading "The Historian" by Elizabeth Kostova, an interesting novel about some of the more interesting information regarding Vlad Dracula.

SA_bmatth
01-31-2007, 08:47 PM
I am curious ... is Victor related to the conductor Otto Klemperer? I wouldn't be suprised as it's a very rare name!

And yes, Werner Klemperer of "Col Klink" fame is Otto's son. :w00t:

Yes, a cousin though apparently not close. Victor at one point in the book refers to Otto parenthetically as "the Catholic!" Victor was Protestant. Imagine that...leading up to WWII two converted Jews fighting over Christianity :confused1

Edcculus
01-31-2007, 09:33 PM
Foundations of Marketing.....I dont really get much pleasure reading in while I'm in school.

rtaylor61
01-31-2007, 09:35 PM
The Year of Pleasures by Elizabeth Berg. I've read 4-5 of her books. And they are somewhat in the class of "chick" books, but are very well written.

Randy

BrianP
02-01-2007, 05:56 AM
The Theory of Poker (David Sklansky)

I'll be starting 10 Conversations You Need to Have with Your Children by Shmuley Boteach.

Taz
02-01-2007, 06:01 AM
The Complete Gillette Collectors Handbook:biggrin: Seriously I am, I need help:eek:

JimWIU
02-01-2007, 06:13 AM
I just finished Act of Treason by Vince Flynn, he's currently my favorite author. If you like Tom Clancy, you'll really like Vince Flynn.

I also read a lot of Tess Gerritsen. Other then that I mostly read technical stuff for work :(

SmoovD
02-01-2007, 07:48 AM
Another multi-book reader:

Currently working on The Closing of the Western Mind, The Good Men and The Invasion Within:The Contest of Cultures in Colonial North America.

More entertaining than American Idol.

Doc4
02-01-2007, 07:53 AM
Ah! I've been a fan of Otto's conducting for a long time, and even know a little bit of his bio ... the other readers of this thread might not know that Otto had to convert from Judaism to Catholicism in order to get anywhere in the world of conducting in Germany in the 1920s ... presumably Victor had the same problem and chose a different flavour of compliance.


Yes, a cousin though apparently not close. Victor at one point in the book refers to Otto parenthetically as "the Catholic!" Victor was Protestant. Imagine that...leading up to WWII two converted Jews fighting over Christianity :confused1

Areler67
02-01-2007, 08:26 AM
hello,

I'm reading the Nuremberg interviews from Leon Goldensohn. it's a very interesting book.

Raphaël

rschul2
02-01-2007, 09:56 AM
I'm currently reading The Histories by Herodotus.

qhsdoitall
02-01-2007, 10:22 AM
Nothing dramatic, serious or thought provoking. Too much of that in my life as it is.

Pet Peeve by Piers Anthony
Taste of Home Magazine
Culinary Academy Wrap & Roll Cookbook

Next in line:
The Runes of Earth by Stephen R. Donaldson

Amyn
02-01-2007, 10:25 AM
I strongly believe in Steven Colbert's philosophy when it comes to reading...

but I just finished reading The Da Vinci Code. Must say the book beats the movie hands down.

Bricktop
02-01-2007, 05:08 PM
I just found out what I will be reading on July 21, 2007. :wink:

tim8557
02-01-2007, 06:05 PM
The Last Templar.

TimmyBoston
02-01-2007, 09:04 PM
I just found out what I will be reading on July 21, 2007. :wink:

I will be reserving my copy as well. :biggrin:


To those of you with a more active social life than myself, July 21st is the release date for the 7th Harry Potter book, just announced today. :smile:

uatrmpt
02-03-2007, 12:52 PM
I'm about a third of the way through The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Somehow, I missed that one in high school and college. I've been wanting to read it for a long time and have finally gotten around to it.

I think that if you were to spend a weekend reading The Jungle and watching Supersize Me, you'd never eat meat again!

scorpion
02-03-2007, 01:01 PM
I'm about a third of the way through The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Somehow, I missed that one in high school and college. I've been wanting to read it for a long time and have finally gotten around to it.

I think that if you were to spend a weekend reading The Jungle and watching Supersize Me, you'd never eat meat again!

Add fast food nation to that list and you won't look back!

ravkesef
02-03-2007, 01:03 PM
The Last Templar.

This one was inspired by the Da Vinci Code, but it's pure trash. Poorly written with an absurd scenario badly handled.:frown:

SA_bmatth
02-03-2007, 01:11 PM
I think that if you were to spend a weekend reading The Jungle and watching Supersize Me, you'd never eat meat again!

You should read Theodore Roosevelt's speech "The Man with the Muckrake" since it was largely inspired by Sinclair.

By the way, I've read "The Jungle" and watched Supersize Me and I like my meat medium rare :thumbup:

uatrmpt
02-03-2007, 01:12 PM
By the way, I've read "The Jungle" and watched Supersize Me and I like my meat medium rare :thumbup:

Well, I haven't exactly given up my favorite Taco Bell combo! :biggrin:

TimmyBoston
02-03-2007, 01:37 PM
This one was inspired by the Da Vinci Code, but it's pure trash. Poorly written with an absurd scenario badly handled.:frown:

Those were my exact thoughts on The Da Vinci Code. Aside from any religous perspective in the book, which I didn't believe in the slightest, but I thought it might be a good book, I was so wrong.
I thought it was a joke, horribly written and with a dragging and trite plot. Without a doubt on of the worst books I've read in the last few years. I would have just taken it back to the library before I finished it, but it so popular I thought there had to be something to the plot, I was horribly wrong. :thumbdown

htownmmm
02-03-2007, 01:40 PM
The Bible again-currently in Isaiah.


Marty

TimmyBoston
02-03-2007, 09:20 PM
The Bible again-currently in Isaiah.


Marty

Marty, that's fantastic. I actually just started reading the Bible all the way through, I'm just finishing Genesis, but I'm really enjoying it.

scagooch
02-04-2007, 06:21 AM
Currently reading Earl Aubec Stories by Michael Moorcock(started today)
I like his novels but his characters always seem to "crossover" from other novels much like marvel comics.

javyn
02-04-2007, 09:28 AM
Today I plan on reading The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran.

Then, Maldoror by Comte de Lautreamont.

Then, I guess getting to Ulysses, which I too have been putting off...for about 2 years now. I love stream of conscious too heh. I just haven't had the mental energy lately to tackle it. Portrait of the Artists was great, and Under The Volcano by Lowry is my favorite novel of all time.

Iceman
02-04-2007, 06:59 PM
I am reading The Coming China Wars Where They Will Be Fought And How They Can Be Won by Peter Navarro. This book paints a scary scenerio of the current Chinese collision course with the rest of the world. The Coming China Wars will be fought over everything from decent jobs, livable wages, leading edge technology to strategic resources such as oil, copper, and steel.

Bahamianlvr
02-06-2007, 08:49 AM
I just finished "What to say when you talk to yourself" by Shad Helmstetter. Currently reading "How I raised myself from failure to success in selling" by Frank Bettger

DangoS
02-06-2007, 09:32 AM
Currently reading Gulag Archipelago Vol 1. Fascinating read, and hotly contested by my Russian in-laws.

rtaylor61
02-06-2007, 09:58 AM
I just finished "What to say when you talk to yourself" by Shad Helmstetter. Currently reading "How I raised myself from failure to success in selling" by Frank Bettger

Frank Bettger's book is a classic. While the information may seem a bit dated, it is still very relevant in today's world.

Randy

slcsteve
02-06-2007, 10:07 AM
Several going:

The Fallen
A History of The End of The World
The One Percent Doctrine
The God Delusion

Just finished The Kennedy Men
Breakpoint

Bahamianlvr
02-06-2007, 10:28 AM
Frank Bettger's book is a classic. While the information may seem a bit dated, it is still very relevant in today's world.

Randy


I have to smile when I read parts of the book that date it. Timeless info indeed.

esfeld
02-06-2007, 12:31 PM
WOW I was surprised to see The Jungle in a modern reading list .... absolutely one of my all time favorite reads ..... albeit many many ages ago...

Iceman: Thank you for suggesting "The coming China Wars" I'm all over it ... anxious to get all the insight I can .....I'll be there for three weeks in June ..haven't been there in 20 years.

I've been all through William Gibson, Neil Stephenson, Nick Sagan, Pat Cadigan and that ilk .......... now that tech stuff is so mainstream nobody seems to be addressing the genre. As a techie I enjoy any good mystery with a cyber slant.

If you've ever been to Italy, especially Venice you have to get a hold of everything written by Dona Leon.

I am in the midst of going through the series by Randy Wayne White ..... all in and around Sanibel and Captive Island in Florida ..... they're great mysteries
but he is a bright bright individual and he intersperses some very fascinating insights on life.

jweaver
02-06-2007, 12:43 PM
I just finished
Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East: 1776 to the Present by Michael B. Oren and I started the Yom Kippur War by Abraham Rabinovich.

Sprinkled in is Thomas Sowell's Ever Ask Why? a collection of his columns.

JohnP
02-06-2007, 12:53 PM
For the history buffs out there,
I read "freebie" books (we have a book exchange at the E-club on San Clemente Island when I'm out there)
and the last one that really really impressed me was
Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield. The tactics and equipment are fairly believable on both sides, brings life into the now infamous (Amazon uses the term "epic") battle of Thermopylae, where 300 or less Spartans were pitted against multiple thousands of men of the armies of the Persian empire.
Really good read.
I've read other stuff, but that one deserves to be mentioned.
John P.

rtaylor61
02-06-2007, 09:41 PM
"Say When" by Elizabeth Berg.

Randy

Bob Dobbs
02-06-2007, 10:07 PM
"Red" by Ted Dekker

Stauff
02-07-2007, 07:35 AM
Der Mann ohne Eigenschaften, by Robert Musil. Voted in Germany as the greatest novel ever. I can see why. Brilliant and very funny.

Lynchmeister
02-07-2007, 10:50 AM
Currently in a three-way between my two favorite authors in two languages...huh...that's weird. Anyway, I'm reading London Fields by Martin Amis, Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh, and Drecksau (literally filthy pig), which is the German translation of Filth (also by Welsh).

TimmyBoston
02-08-2007, 12:35 AM
I finished a couple audiobooks today. The Forgotten Man by Robert Crais and Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity by John Stossel. I liked both very much.

The Forgotten Man is an Elvis Cole PI novel. It is Crais' most recent Cole novel and shows his increasing depth in character and plot. He delved into Cole's parentage, his crazy mother and unknown father and how it shaped the young man into the intelligent, funny and at times dangerous man he has become. Full of twists and a mystery I wasn't able to solve on my own. One thing I didn't like it Crais increasing alteration of his 1st person novels. The earliest Cole novel were strictly 1st person as he progressed he began to put more and more 3rd person accounts from other character's perspectives. This novel had as much 3rd person as it did 1st. Especially with Private Eye novels I adore 1st person narration, I would have liked to see more. Also there was a little too much character development for me, but still an enjoyable book and I looked forward to hearing more.

A book that I've been listening to as I wrote a few reviews tonight was John Stossel's Myths, Lies and Downright Stupidy. I enjoyed it enough to listen through the entire book in one sitting. I only finished it minutes ago. Stossel is a libretarian. I am a conservative person, but I also have many libretarian views and I have always enjoyed Stossels work, both in print and on television and I enjoyed his last book, Give Me a Break very much as well. Stossel goes through specific myths prepetuated by the media, the polictically correct academians, and politicians. I very much recommend this book for anyone looking for a nice dose of common sense and a chuckle here and there.

180gVinyl
02-08-2007, 03:25 AM
I have enjoyed all the Elvis Cole novels as well as the other novels by Robert Crais.

Not currently reading anything but have a couple lined up

My favourite authors are in the genre known as "Crime Fiction" in the UK and "Mystery" in the US

James Ellroy
George P Pelecanos
Robert Crais
Michael Connelly
Jim Thompson
Dennis Lehane
James Lee Burke
Daniel Woodrell

Groomer Monkey
02-08-2007, 05:46 AM
I have so many books on the go; each fuels a different mood or gives me inspiration in different ways (I write myself - a wannabe, yes):

'Don Quixote' - Cervantes
'The Brothers Karamazov' - Dostoyevsky
'Our Man in Havana' - Greene
'Choke' - Palahniuk
'Airfix, Celebrating 50 years of the greatest Plastic Kits in the World'
'The New Penguin History of The World' - Amazing, effin brilliant.
'The Dangerous Book For Boys' - Iggulden Brothers
'For Whom The Bells Toll' - Hemmingway

And yes, most of my inspiration comes from a time when life was simpler (if harder physically) and you knew from which direction the enemy came - so to speak.

norman931
02-08-2007, 06:35 AM
I forgot, I'm also reading "The Problem of Pain" by Lewis. I really love Lewis's writing, but I find that I can't just read it, I have study it. He is truly one brilliant man.

I agree. Lewis is one of the few authors I keep going back to. My favorites: Mere Christianity, The Abolition of Man, The Screwtape Letters. Out of the Silent Planet is one of the best science fiction novels around; not very technical, but he puts you in another world.Not many writers can pull that off successfully.

Lynchmeister
02-08-2007, 01:00 PM
When I first posted to this thread I was at work, but now I'm at home looking at my bookshelf. For those of you that like biographies, I will suggest "Memoirs," by David Rockefeller, who was one of John D. Rockefeller's grandchildren, and also "Between You and Me," by Mike Wallace. Both excellent reads written by two fascinating people!

Bob Dobbs
02-15-2007, 10:25 PM
Now we're on to "White" by Ted Dekker. The final book in the trilogy.

rtaylor61
02-15-2007, 10:39 PM
Waiting for Your Cat to Bark?: Persuading Customers When They Ignore Marketing by Bryan Eisenberg, Jeffrey Eisenberg, Lisa T. Davis

Randy

Crag
02-16-2007, 02:09 AM
If mine is a double post I apologize.

I am currently reading Napolen Hill, Think and Grow Rich. I'll be done with it in two days, then it's time for The Secret, and when I'm done with that I'll read 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership by John C. Maxwell.

Of course, I am also reading The Book of Mormon on a regular basis..nightly as a matter of fact.

JBHoren
02-16-2007, 09:14 AM
I have enjoyed all the Elvis Cole novels as well as the other novels by Robert Crais.

Not currently reading anything but have a couple lined up

My favourite authors are in the genre known as "Crime Fiction" in the UK and "Mystery" in the US

James Ellroy
George P Pelecanos
Robert Crais
Michael Connelly
Jim Thompson
Dennis Lehane
James Lee Burke
Daniel Woodrell

I would add to this listing the name of Joe Gores; especially, his "DKA" series. You'll probably have difficulty finding any-or-all of them in your public library, but they're all available new/used on Amazon, and also on eBay. Excellent reading; and, again, should be read chronologically.

bordeaaj
02-16-2007, 07:42 PM
Just finished The Terror by Dan Simmons and now am starting World War Z by Max Brooks and Anthony Bourdain's A Cooks Tour.

DMS
02-16-2007, 08:48 PM
Isaac's Storm, by Erik Larson

A story of the 1900 Galveston hurricane.

tim8557
02-17-2007, 05:33 AM
I'm going to be starting "Lonesome Dove" this evening based on a recommendation in this thread.

teamacacia
02-17-2007, 07:28 AM
Not enough time for leisurly reading here. Currently I am reading through Morgan and Mikhail's Clinical Anesthesia to be followed by Jensen's Big Blue Anesthesia Review and then Barasch's Anesthesia Text. After that, hopefully sometime this fall, I will be able to dip into texts more specialized in obstetric and pediatric anesthesia. Only two and a half more years of residency and (hopefully) only three more in-training/board exams.

mjrtoo
02-17-2007, 10:22 AM
Currently reading The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski.

Interesting book about a book about a movie about a house, horror related. Pretty complex reading to me.

19george
02-17-2007, 11:29 AM
Reading The Early Church by Henry Chadwick.

Its a History book about the first 800 years of Christianity. It can be a bit heavy at times, but its a great intro to the topic.

180gVinyl
02-17-2007, 03:52 PM
I would add to this listing the name of Joe Gores; especially, his "DKA" series. You'll probably have difficulty finding any-or-all of them in your public library, but they're all available new/used on Amazon, and also on eBay. Excellent reading; and, again, should be read chronologically.


I appreciate the tip

I've actually got a copy of Hammett by Joe Gores that I haven't read yet

JaDubb
02-18-2007, 09:29 AM
Eric Tamms overwhelming Brian Eno: His Music and the Vertical Color of Sound. It's quite thorough guide to thoughts, experiments and music of Mr. Eno.

SA_bmatth
02-18-2007, 09:40 AM
Brian Eno

It doesn't get any better than Portsmouth Sinfonia. Or worse....

Bob Dobbs
02-18-2007, 10:51 AM
Just finished "White" by Ted Dekker :thumbsup:

Moving on to "You Suck" by Christopher Moore :a51:

KenS
02-18-2007, 11:27 AM
It appears as though I am the only one here reading fantasy; Eldest by Christopher Paolini.
Ken.
Living the fantasy of early retirement.

sphughes
02-18-2007, 11:28 AM
Great thread here.....

Based on recommendations I picked up here, I am midway through book 2 of the George R. R. Martin series, A Song of Ice and Fire. " A Game of Thrones" was outstanding and I can't put down "A Clash of Kings". I ordered the 4 books at once along with Mervyn Peake's The Gormenghast Novels.

I have been reading too many books analyzing the current state of global politics and found myself growing too cynical for my own liking. These books are a welcome breath of fresh air for me. Thanks again to all the contributors for your opinions.

-Scott

Lynchmeister
02-18-2007, 02:22 PM
Just finished The Terror by Dan Simmons and now am starting World War Z by Max Brooks and Anthony Bourdain's A Cooks Tour.

I hope you enjoy A Cook's Tour as much as I did. :thumbup:

TimmyBoston
02-18-2007, 02:52 PM
I hope you enjoy A Cook's Tour as much as I did. :thumbup:

I read Kitchen Confidential a while back. I honestly didn't enjoy it in the traditional sense, but it was very interesting and kept my attention.

boboakalfb
02-19-2007, 08:13 PM
Right now I am reading Death in the Long Grass by Peter Hathaway Capstick. I believe that Todd had mentioned it. This is a good book. :thumbup:

ouch
02-19-2007, 08:33 PM
Right now I am reading Death in the Long Grass by Peter Hathaway Capstick. I believe that Todd had mentioned it. This is a good book. :thumbup:

Admit it, Bob. You're still reading What to Expect When You're Expecting. :lol:

TromboneGuy
02-19-2007, 09:41 PM
It appears as though I am the only one here reading fantasy; Eldest by Christopher Paolini.
Ken.
Living the fantasy of early retirement.

Heh. Count me as a fantasy fan - I like books that distract me when I'm reading for fun.

If you're into those sorts of books Terry Pratchett is my hands-down all-time favorite. Any of his Discworld series is brilliant, but if you've never read him before I'd look for, say, The Last Continent or earlier stuff. Later than that and you've missed a LOT of character development.

Hmm, let's see, I can come up with some other recommendaitons...

Non-fiction
Einstein's Violin - Joseph Eger
Michelangelo and the Pope's Cieling or
Brunelleschi's Dome - both by Ross King

That last one in particular is fascinating - all about how Brunelleschi managed to design and build the dome on the Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence.

As for what I'm actually reading right now? The History of Orchestration by Alan Carse. That one's for a class, though. :redface:

patrisVII
02-20-2007, 08:13 AM
Death Rat by Mike Nelson and the Radiotron Designer's Handbook.

urr-lord
02-20-2007, 12:39 PM
cally's war by john ringo
deals with the aftermath of an invasion of earth that was repulsed and the cleanup (in many ways).i think it is book 5 in the set.i missed book 4,have to find it.
have 'the interrogators' waiting.it is the tale of the us intel staff in afghanistan.
other than that reading guns and ammo and new american issues that a friend gives me.

boboakalfb
02-20-2007, 06:13 PM
Admit it, Bob. You're still reading What to Expect When You're Expecting. :lol:

:lol: No...I am done with that one. I did just purchase What to Expect the First Year. For my wife of course...

bordeaaj
02-20-2007, 10:01 PM
I hope you enjoy A Cook's Tour as much as I did. :thumbup:


I read Kitchen Confidential a while back. I honestly didn't enjoy it in the traditional sense, but it was very interesting and kept my attention.

I did enjoy Kitchen Confidential quite a bit but I listened to the audiobook on my iPod while commuting when it first came out. I think I know what you mean by not enjoying it in the traditional sense, but the audiobook was read by Bourdain himself so that may have made the difference. I couldn't stop thinking about it and ended up buying several of his hardcopy books, including A Cook's Tour and a couple of his mysteries, etc. I would like to hear him read A Cook's Tour too, but I can only find that one abridged. I have also since become addicted to his show No Reservations on the Travel Channel. Something about the personality of his writing both repels and attracts me...weird.

Bob Dobbs
02-20-2007, 10:11 PM
:lol: No...I am done with that one. I did just purchase What to Expect the First Year. For my wife of course...

Wise purchase Bob. Had I bought that book sooner, I could have saved a lot of money (and a lot of frayed nerves) on panicked calls to the doctor for things that were totally normal! :blushing:

All the best-

TimmyBoston
02-24-2007, 11:45 PM
Calvin and Hobbes: Sunday Pages 1985-1995 by Bill Watterson

Calvin and Hobbes make me happy. :biggrin:

TimmyBoston
02-24-2007, 11:47 PM
I did enjoy Kitchen Confidential quite a bit but I listened to the audiobook on my iPod while commuting when it first came out. I think I know what you mean by not enjoying it in the traditional sense, but the audiobook was read by Bourdain himself so that may have made the difference. I couldn't stop thinking about it and ended up buying several of his hardcopy books, including A Cook's Tour and a couple of his mysteries, etc. I would like to hear him read A Cook's Tour too, but I can only find that one abridged. I have also since become addicted to his show No Reservations on the Travel Channel. Something about the personality of his writing both repels and attracts me...weird.

I actually listened to the Audiobook read by Bourdain as well. He did a good job narrating and the book moves. But I guess I disliked so many characters so much and some of his views, that I wouldn't say I enjoyed the book overall. Though he did have some good insights and advice.

Lab Brat
02-28-2007, 09:01 AM
I'm almost finished with Lamb by Christopher Moore. I read A Dirty Job a while back and loved it, so I figured I'd give this a try.

slcsteve
02-28-2007, 10:16 AM
Finished Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin
A clever, fun read and a great period (12th century) mystery.

Currently: Collapse by Jared Diamond
How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

Still plowing through: A History of the End of the World by Jonathan Kirsch

scruffyv
02-28-2007, 11:13 AM
But I am about to start The Satanic Verses by Rushdie. I want to see what all of the fuss was about. Also, I am recently into books which shed light on the Indian experience in the western world. I tend to go at my reading thematically-- a year ago I was into biographies of american founding fathers (MCcolough's work on John Adams is a standout!), then I was into WWII military history, now this.

I have a warm spot in my heart for novels-- there is so much to be learned about human nature. I just think the act of understanding and accepting the author's world makes you more adept at understanding the "real" one. The pure entertainment value of being immersed is at the core of the attraction.

I am also reading "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" with my 8-year-old. We are reading it aloud and it is a wonderful experience. The novel is supremely tuned for episodic reading-- each chapter has a bit of a cliffhanger ending, making you eager to turn to the next. Perfect juvenalia. And it reminds me of the Dickens works I plowed through as a young adult-- Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, Pickwick.

There are so many folks on this forum who write very well . . . it is a pleasure to read the posts, not just as helpful information but as writing. Leaisure Guy is a good example of someone who takes the simple task of laying out facts about shaving and turns that into a finely tuned craft.

Vin

Bob Dobbs
02-28-2007, 11:22 AM
Just finished "You Suck" by Christopher Moore. One of the funniest books ever! :lol1:

Have moved on to "Deep Storm" by Lincoln Child. It's a great, fun thriller. :em2300:

ericmoritz
02-28-2007, 11:44 AM
I'm currently listening to the 7th Son podiobook during my commute to work

http://www.jchutchins.net/7Son/Home/Home.html
http://www.podiobooks.com/podiobooks/book.php?ID=53

There's a whole bunch of good podcast novels on the podiobooks site. I recommend, "Heaven", "The Failed Cities Monologues" and "How to succeed in evil" as well.

qhsdoitall
02-28-2007, 11:55 AM
Currently is Harry Potter - "Goblet of Fire". I'm catching up on my backlog. Just finished Piers Anthony's "Key to Havoc", Next will be Piers Anthony's "Key to Chroma", after that will be Harry Potter - "Order of the Phoenix"

ericmoritz
02-28-2007, 08:58 PM
WOW I was surprised to see The Jungle in a modern reading list .... absolutely one of my all time favorite reads ..... albeit many many ages ago...

Iceman: Thank you for suggesting "The coming China Wars" I'm all over it ... anxious to get all the insight I can .....I'll be there for three weeks in June ..haven't been there in 20 years.

I've been all through William Gibson, Neil Stephenson, Nick Sagan, Pat Cadigan and that ilk .......... now that tech stuff is so mainstream nobody seems to be addressing the genre. As a techie I enjoy any good mystery with a cyber slant.

If you've ever been to Italy, especially Venice you have to get a hold of everything written by Dona Leon.

I am in the midst of going through the series by Randy Wayne White ..... all in and around Sanibel and Captive Island in Florida ..... they're great mysteries
but he is a bright bright individual and he intersperses some very fascinating insights on life.

I ought pick up some Randy Wayne White, I'm literally five minutes from Sanibel Island.

ericmoritz
02-28-2007, 09:35 PM
I have a warm spot in my heart for novels-- there is so much to be learned about human nature. I just think the act of understanding and accepting the author's world makes you more adept at understanding the "real" one. The pure entertainment value of being immersed is at the core of the attraction.

I'd have to agree with you. After I started reading novels regularly, I realized that my speech improved considerably. My writing skills improved as well.

A word of advice to anyone: don't be afraid to read something that is about a subject that you would normally shy away from. If it's important enough to write a book about, it's important to read and experience.

I think reading a novel is the closest thing to really diving into someone else's memories and psyche. It's like spending a week in someone else's head and experiencing what they experience. It is experiencing something that you would not normally ever get the chance to experience yourself.

Even though it may be fiction, you are still feeling how the author feels. There is something really personal and human about reading a work of fiction that you can not experience through the silver screen. A movie has so many people influencing the personality of a story that it looses that personal feel to it.

With novels I also noticed that my world-view expanded. After I read "On the Road" and "Dharma Bums", I realized that there really wasn't anything new under the sun. Folks in the Forties and Fifties were doing the same things my generation is doing now. All the mistakes I can make were already made by those before me and that if they can make it through them, so could I.

Prior to reading those books I thought that my situations were unique and I felt alienated. After reading them, I felt connected; like we are all on the same path, just at different times and different places.

E.

Bob Dobbs
03-02-2007, 11:18 PM
I'm currently listening to the 7th Son podiobook during my commute to work

http://www.jchutchins.net/7Son/Home/Home.html
http://www.podiobooks.com/podiobooks/book.php?ID=53

There's a whole bunch of good podcast novels on the podiobooks site. I recommend, "Heaven", "The Failed Cities Monologues" and "How to succeed in evil" as well.

Thanks Eric,

I just subscribed to "7th Son" and "Heaven" through iTunes.

I'm a huge fan of audible.com. They're not free but they've got a ton of books.

Just finished "Deep Storm" by Lincoln Child. A great thriller that I highly recommend. :thumbup1: Started "Heart Shaped Box" by Joe Hill today.

When I'm done with that, I'll move on to "Heaven"

prophet
03-03-2007, 04:37 PM
Lost City by Clive Cussler...its ok, but not great.

DMS
03-03-2007, 05:00 PM
Crusade In Europe, Dwight D. Eisenhower

ericmoritz
03-03-2007, 05:20 PM
Thanks Eric,

I just subscribed to "7th Son" and "Heaven" through iTunes.

I'm a huge fan of audible.com. They're not free but they've got a ton of books.

Just finished "Deep Storm" by Lincoln Child. A great thriller that I highly recommend. :thumbup1: Started "Heart Shaped Box" by Joe Hill today.

When I'm done with that, I'll move on to "Heaven"

I'm almost done with the first book of 7th son, it's is amazing.

catatonic
03-03-2007, 06:33 PM
Bruce Schneier
Self-Study Course in Block Cipher Cryptanalysis

It's a dry read if you are not interested in codes and cyphers, but is so far a very good read.

TimmyBoston
03-04-2007, 02:49 AM
Lost City by Clive Cussler...its ok, but not great.

I like Cussler a lot. None of it's brilliant, but it's enjoyable. The Kurt Austin Novels are what I prefer now, since the addition of Dirk Jr and Summer to the Pitt novels, which IMO was an ridiculously stupid idea.

boboakalfb
03-20-2007, 01:24 PM
This is a good thread so lets keep it alive...

Death in the Long Grass was so good that I am going to continue on with some of his other books. I am currently reading Death in the Silent Places. I also just started Freakonomics (http://www.amazon.com/Freakonomics-Revised-Expanded-Economist-Everything/dp/0061234001/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4619202-3066548?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174422106&sr=1-1) and now am almost finished. This is a very interesting book and would definitely recommend it to everyone.

michaelskar
03-20-2007, 01:39 PM
I also just started Freakonomics (http://www.amazon.com/Freakonomics-Revised-Expanded-Economist-Everything/dp/0061234001/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4619202-3066548?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174422106&sr=1-1) and now am almost finished. This is a very interesting book and would definitely recommend it to everyone.


I had seen this book but not paid much attention to it. After reading reviews on Amazon I will definitely be checking this out...sounds right up my alley! thanks for the tip!

btisko
03-20-2007, 01:53 PM
I am reading two fine works of literature: Den of Thieves by James B. Stewart (Ivan Boesky anyone?) and The God Particle- If the Universe is the Answer, What is the Question? (book about the history of physics) by Leon Lederman, and I would like to read a book called The Origin of the Species (you may have heard of it) by Charlie Darwin.

qhsdoitall
03-20-2007, 02:03 PM
Life's too short for serious reading. I'm reading "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" by J.K. Rowling.

TimmyBoston
03-20-2007, 02:12 PM
Life's too short for serious reading. I'm reading "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" by J.K. Rowling.

Yeah, I'm going to reread all of them before Deathly Hallows comes out. They may be kids books, but I really do love the Harry Potter books.

ProphetNoir
03-20-2007, 06:29 PM
I have one for home and another to read on the subway ride to and from work.
I am reading Atlas Shrugged at home. (Sometimes I feel like I need to go to a neutral corner, take a seat on a stool and drink water between chapters)
I am re-reading the Blue Rose trilogy by Peter Straub on the train. (I am one round trip away from finishing The Throat, this will make three times in the last 10 years and I don't think I will ever stop loving any of the three novels enough to skip a single word.)
Next week I will start reading Koko on the train, it is by far the most complex book of the three.
Once I had them all in hardcover - now they are all out of print - but, I scoured the Internet and managed to find a new copy of each to send to my son. Now he will get to share a part of my madness.

smoothshaver
03-20-2007, 06:53 PM
This is a good thread to keep alive.

I just finished Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation, by Joseph E. Ellis. Ellis deals with the early days of the US under the Constitution (Washington, Adams, Jefferson administrations) and the political considerations that went into establishing the new republic.

Also recently read and recommended: Edward J. Larson, Evolution: The remarkable history of a scientific theory.

johnniegold
03-20-2007, 07:14 PM
Just finished: American Legend: The Real Life Adventures of David Crockett by Buddy Levy (good read, separates the man from the myth)

Just started: The Last Tsar: The Life and Death of Nicholas II by Edvard Radzinsky (very good so far)

sparkchaser
03-20-2007, 07:37 PM
I am reading two books right now:

"The Annotated H.P. Lovecraft" by S. T. Joshi and H.P. Lovecraft is what I am kinda reading off and on. It is a collection of his more famous short stories and the annotations are pretty good.

The book I have designated my travel reading is "You Shall Know Our Velocity" by Dave Eggers. I was very fortunate to find a copy of the first run self-published through McSweeney’s Books. It's cool in that the cover is the bginning of the story and all the usual front end copyright stuff is in the very back.

http://www.sobersorry.supereva.it/eggers.jpg

I felt very lucky to find a copy of this and so far it's a great read.


Next on the reading list is: "Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed" by Jared Diamond.

JonnyAngel
03-20-2007, 08:33 PM
My lastest is "The Seducers Diary." It is a semi autobiographical novel by Soren Kierkegaard. On amazon they speak of how this book was an attempt to put right in the relationship as what went wrong. I very much feel that they have totally missed the point. The amount of work that the seducer puts into the relationship is not that of a love crazed man. I have found the book to be quite interesting and eye opening to the process of love and romance. Also, it deal with moral issues and the different lives that people can live to lead. Three types are discussed, religious, moral or aesthetic. I suppose it interested me as a wanna be Don Juan! :wink:

Porcine
03-21-2007, 05:31 AM
Bobby and J. Edgar, by Burton Hersh. Book will be available in May, as will another one I read, Nixon and Kissinger, by Ronald Dallek. If any of you are old enough to remember the Charles Manson Murders, the prosecutor, Vincent Bugliosi, has a 1600 page work on the JFK assassination, Reclaiming History, also coming out in May.

Cheers!
Porcine (Librarian and book reviewer).

TimmyBoston
03-22-2007, 05:32 AM
The Brothers Bulger by Howie Carr, the story of disgraced politican Billy Bulger and his brother Irish mob boss and fugitive Whitey Bulger. Very interesting both in Boston history, politics and crime lore. A very good read.

JBHoren
03-22-2007, 07:15 AM
Although, with the length and depth of his novels, "kick" is hardly appropriate (or doable).

After finishing what is (to me) his magnum opus, "Until I Find You" in early-February, I followed-up with "A Prayer for Owen Meany"... an interesting, sometimes exasperating novel.

Now I'm some 60-pages into an earlier novel of his, "A Son of the Circus" -- I'm enjoying it, but will reserve final judgment until I finish it (at 600+ pages, it won't be for another 3-4 weeks).

I have two earlier novels of his -- "The Water-Method Man" and "The 158-Pound Marriage" -- on reserve at the local Public Library (which I unreservedly recommend as everyone's first-stop for reading material).

Interestingly, one of my rules (which I almost never break) is reading an author's works chronologically... especially in this day of characters reappearing and developing across novels. However, I seem to be reading John Irving in reverse. "Until I Find You" is his most-recent work, for example.

I cannot express how deeply I was touched (perhaps wrenched is more appropriate) by "Until I Find You". Again, weighing-in at 700+ pages, it paralleled and/or resonated with much of my life and experiences, at so many levels (sometimes, to a personally difficult degree). It is a demanding work; one which requires an equal amount of "work" on the reader's part. "Until I Find You" is, simply, the finest novel I have ever read. I recommend it without reservation.

craigl14
03-22-2007, 09:49 AM
Mario Puzo's The Godfather, I've seen the movie a dozen times, but never read the book, it's outstanding, what a wonderful book.

Like you I had seen the movies (all three) many times, but never read the book. I did read it two or three years ago. It's amazing (1) what they left out of the movie and (2) the additional "color" the characters and events have in the book. As an example, the bridesmaid Sonny is messing around with at the beginning of the movie is really expanded on in the book. Not that it was that significant, just the example that popped into my head. Really enjoyed the book. I also read the alleged sequel, not by Puzo, called Godfather Returns or something like that. Interesting, but definitely not Puzo.

craigl14
03-22-2007, 10:02 AM
I just finished reading the latest James Patterson - Cross and Ted Bell's - Spy. Ted Bell's books are very James Bond-ish, excellent reading.


I just finished Act of Treason by Vince Flynn, he's currently my favorite author. If you like Tom Clancy, you'll really like Vince Flynn.

If you like Ted Bell you will love Vince Flynn. He's my favorite right now also. Not a big fan of Clancy...just never could get into him. Maybe too much detail or too slow developing.

Once you read about Mitch Rapp in Flynn and see Jack Bauer on 24, James Bond is pretty tame.

jkroll
03-22-2007, 11:52 AM
Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell. The poor chap often couldn't even afford shaving soap. There is much else that is shocking, but at least as much that is quite hilarious.

Graham
03-22-2007, 12:04 PM
I grabbed a copy of the new Clive Cussler 'Dirk Pitt' adventure, "Treasure of Khan", I have read all his Pitt adventure ones. I am saving it for next week when we jet of to Barbados for 2 weeks, you know, laying in a hammock reading my book, in the shade of the palms, waiters bringing cocktails and snacks all day, the sea gently coming up the golden beach etc etc :001_tongu

TimmyBoston
03-22-2007, 08:39 PM
Now I'm some 60-pages into an earlier novel of his, "A Son of the Circus" -- I'm enjoying it, but will reserve final judgment until I finish it (at 600+ pages, it won't be for another 3-4 weeks).
.

Son of the Circus is my favorite Irving Novel by far. Admittedly I'm critical of Mr. Irving, but Son of the Circus was quite good, now I also read The Water Method Man but didn't care for it a bit.

TimmyBoston
03-22-2007, 08:40 PM
I grabbed a copy of the new Clive Cussler 'Dirk Pitt' adventure, "Treasure of Khan", I have read all his Pitt adventure ones. I am saving it for next week when we jet of to Barbados for 2 weeks, you know, laying in a hammock reading my book, in the shade of the palms, waiters bringing cocktails and snacks all day, the sea gently coming up the golden beach etc etc :001_tongu

I just started Treasure of Khan a night or two ago. I am also a big Cussler fan and have read all of his books, so far I'm enjoying it.

ratcheer
03-23-2007, 01:19 PM
I am reading The Bridge to Terabithia to my 9-year old son, but I am enjoying it thoroughly, myself.

My family went to the movies, last night, and he made me take him to see it. I didn't really want to go, as we are only about halfway through the book. The movie is very, very good, but the ending is sort of lame. Still, I would recommend it to anyone. I feel like it gave me new insight on the human condition.

Tim

jimbush
03-23-2007, 05:09 PM
Two I have just finished:
The Trampling Herd by Paul Wellman is a well written history of the Cattle Range in America written in 1939. sort of like another J Frank Dobie
.
Cicero by Anthony Everitt, a well written biography of a man I consider a real hero,
Currently reading A War like No Other by Victor Hanson. a great book on the Peloponnesian Wars, he takes it from a different tact than Thucydides.
The Nazi Doctors by Robert Lifton. This is the most disturbing, because he looks at how the German Medical establishment could be used to exterminate life. He interviewed surviving doctors and patients. and ties it together so well. I think we need to learn as much as we can because the Germans talked of the right to euthanasia, and took the humanity away from the victims and they started with Birth control, abortion and newborns and progressed step by step. and as a physician I know the "culture of death" as some have called it is still out there.
Finally I am always reading something by PG Wodehouse, the best and funniest writer of English ever in my opinion.

TimmyBoston
03-23-2007, 08:13 PM
I am reading The Bridge to Terabithia to my 9-year old son, but I am enjoying it thoroughly, myself.

My family went to the movies, last night, and he made me take him to see it. I didn't really want to go, as we are only about halfway through the book. The movie is very, very good, but the ending is sort of lame. Still, I would recommend it to anyone. I feel like it gave me new insight on the human condition.

Tim

I saw that movie with my girlfriend and my 8 year old niece. I had never read the book and was totally thrown by the marketing campaign and was totally unprepared for the ending. Long story, short, ended up crying like a baby.

luckysealy
03-23-2007, 10:06 PM
i'm glad to know i'm not the only one who enjoys childrens books. i have just started light in august by william faulkner.

ratcheer
03-24-2007, 07:08 AM
I saw that movie with my girlfriend and my 8 year old niece. I had never read the book and was totally thrown by the marketing campaign and was totally unprepared for the ending. Long story, short, ended up crying like a baby.

I did, too. My son asked me why I was crying. I thought for a second and noticed I was hearing sounds from around the theater. I looked around and almost everyone else was crying, too.

Tim

qhsdoitall
03-26-2007, 11:36 AM
I had not read the book. Got choked up by the ending. Movie wa snot what I expected. My daughter did not like it all. Too deep for her and not an ending she was prepared for.

qhsdoitall
03-26-2007, 11:37 AM
I'm reading Cornelia Funke's "Dragon Rider" to my daughter.

HoustonianYankee
03-26-2007, 10:10 PM
Just finished "The First Man" by Camus. I have begun reading some travel books by H.V. Morton and I can say, without any doubt, he is the best travel writer I have come across.

rtaylor61
03-26-2007, 10:12 PM
I'm re-reading "The Sting". One of my favorite movies, and an even better book!

Randy

MartyW
03-26-2007, 10:54 PM
I just finished "The Watchman" by Robert Crais, and I loved it. I am now reading "The Undercover Economist" by Tim Harford, and it is very interesting. I had previously read "Basic Economics" by Thomas Sowell which is more like a textbook. The Sowell book is more in-depth and academic, but the Harford book is a little more entertaining, so take your pick. I also highly recommend "Ripples of Battle" by Victor Davis Hanson. When you realize that our war policy of victory through destruction of infrastructure was really born from William Tecumseh Sherman's experiences at Shiloh, it really gives you a new perspective on history.

TimmyBoston
03-27-2007, 02:53 AM
I just finished "The Watchman" by Robert Crais, and I loved it.

Marty, I just finished that as well. I love the Cole/Pike books and this is one of my favorites. I really liked the focus on Pike, it was quite refreshing.

Have you read any other Crais novels?

JBHoren
03-27-2007, 05:42 AM
No, this isn't fodder for a "Jerry Springer" episode.

Over the years, I've become accustomed to reading several books at once, alternating between them while eating, or (if one of them is a paperback) in the crapper. No, it's not TMI!

Anyway, in addition to John Irving's "A Son of the Circus", I'm also reading William Gibson's "Pattern Recognition", which is proving to be as compelling as his previous "cyber-genre" novels -- edgy, but in a decidedly less-high-tech venue.

sparkchaser
03-27-2007, 07:21 AM
Anyway, in addition to John Irving's "A Son of the Circus", I'm also reading William Gibson's "Pattern Recognition", which is proving to be as compelling as his previous "cyber-genre" novels -- edgy, but in a decidedly less-high-tech venue.

William Gibson and and Neal Stepehnson are cyberpunk gods in my book. I liked "Pattern Recognition" but it did annoy me a bit with the detailed Pilates segments.

Have you read Stephenson's "Cryptonomicon"?

ben27marie
03-27-2007, 08:38 AM
I just finished Atlantis Found by Clive Cussler and am looking forward to reading more of his books. It was the first book of his that I have read, but I think he'll be near the top of my list of favorite authors for a while.

I also recently read Lilith's Dream by Whitley Strieber. I would recommend reading it without first reading The Hunger and The Last Vampire. I find his books to be much, much better than the movies that have been made based on some of them. The movie version of The Hunger is quite possibly the worst vampire movie ever made and the worst job anyone has ever done making a movie out of a book.

Another good book, I've read recently was The Innocent Man by John Grisham. Because it was nonfiction, it didn't move as fast as his other books, but it is a very well written and very interesting account of a man who was almost put to death for a crime he did not commit.

JBHoren
03-27-2007, 09:01 AM
William Gibson and and Neal Stepehnson are cyberpunk gods in my book. I liked "Pattern Recognition" but it did annoy me a bit with the detailed Pilates segments.

Yes, they are. WRT the Pilates segments: I'm a "gym rat"; in fact, I just got back from my daily cardio workout. It's all part of Cayce's characterization; but, "You say po-TAY-to, and I say po-TAH-to..."


Have you read Stephenson's "Cryptonomicon"?

Yes, I was back in the US (a brief, one-year break from Life in Israel), and borrowed a copy from the public library. What a great read!

Another author in my Pantheon of Cyberpunk Gods is Richard Morgan, whose works include:

Altered Carbon (2002)
Broken Angels (2003)
Market Forces (2004)
Woken Furies (2005)

The first two, and the fourth, feature his anti-hero, Takeshi Kovacs. Here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Morgan) is a link to a nice article about him, in Wikipedia.

mjrtoo
03-27-2007, 12:14 PM
I also enjoy Richard Morgan; I've read all Takeshi novels to date. Fun stuff, I think I still like Altered Carbon the best though.

I'm reading a book by Glen Duncan called 'Death of an Ordinary Man', it's about a man who dies and what it's like in the 'afterlife' watching your family go through the grieving process. He also wrote a book called 'I, Lucifer' where Lucifer gets a second chance to be a good boy when re-incarnated in a body of a human being, very darkly humorous.

sparkchaser
03-27-2007, 01:28 PM
Once my reading stack gets to a manageable size, I will add Richard Morgan to the stack.

ben27marie
03-27-2007, 02:23 PM
I grabbed a copy of the new Clive Cussler 'Dirk Pitt' adventure, "Treasure of Khan", I have read all his Pitt adventure ones. I am saving it for next week when we jet of to Barbados for 2 weeks, you know, laying in a hammock reading my book, in the shade of the palms, waiters bringing cocktails and snacks all day, the sea gently coming up the golden beach etc etc :001_tongu

Have fun reading it in Barbados. I also have a copy of that book that I will start reading very soon (probably tomorrow).

MartyW
03-28-2007, 01:00 AM
Marty, I just finished that as well. I love the Cole/Pike books and this is one of my favorites. I really liked the focus on Pike, it was quite refreshing.

Have you read any other Crais novels?

I've read all of them. I love the sense of humor that he has given Elvis Cole. It really sets his books apart from many others in the same genre. I really enjoyed hearing more of the back story on Joe Pike, and I hope that he will continue to write novels featuring both Elvis Cole and Joe Pike as the main characters. I also like the "Prey" series by John Sandford (real name John Camp, a former Twin Cities newspaper reporter [at the Minneapolis Star Tribune I believe])featuring detective Lucas Davenport. These are especially interesting if you are familiar with the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area (I have been living an hour east of St. Paul in Wisconsin for almost a decade). Nelson DeMille also is a fantastic author. His series featuring detective John Corey is really good, but my favorite is his book "The Gold Coast". He is now working on a sequel to that one, and I am looking forward to it. He takes a little longer to come out with new books compared to some authors, but I feel the wait is worthwhile. Last but certainly not least is Vince Flynn. He lives and works in Minnesota, so he always comes on a local radio show to promote his new books. Mitch Rapp is on a par with Joe Pike as being a cool character.

Mama Bear
03-28-2007, 01:08 AM
Just finished Ray Bradbury's Dandelion Wine.. .for the 4th or 5th time since I was a child.

This is a compilation of stories about his childhood in Waukegan, Illinois, which is the large town immediately to the east of me and where I used to live.. I actually used to own a home on Sheridan rd. on the Ravine which is the area he writes so much about. That was a glorious neighborhood that has seen better times, but what a house that was and what a lovely piece of land. I hope it sees better times again in the future...

Ray Bradbury wrote extensively about Green Town where he grew up.. this was his psuedonymn for Waukegan. I am two towns west of there now in what used to be the wilds and lake area where they would go berry picking for wine ingredients. Many people have told me over the past 15 years of berry picking
(especially wild strawberries) on the piece of land where my home is now..... But as I said, I used to live right there, downtown on the Ravine... and this book has a place in my heart that I don't think another will ever have. Sometimes I forget how many times I have read this book, until I read it again, and find that I can almost recite the stories from heart.... amazing.

Edit.... not to sound like a weirdo, but if you have read this book.. I recently came out with a lime/vanilla shaving soap blend that was prompted into existance by this book. Those who have read the book will know why.. I would dedicate this blend to R. B. if I had the cohones... but, this is where this came from. It may not be the best blend I ever did, but as R. B. said in the book... this is not a quote, I need to go back to the book for that...... but a man who is adventurous enough to enjoy a lime and vanilla ice is a man of substance, integrity and adventure.... those are my own words as I remembered them. I will go back and check the actual quote.

Mama Bear
03-28-2007, 01:59 AM
I hope I don't get in trouble for this.... from Dandelion Wine... by Miss Helen Loomis......

"Young man, " she said to Bill Forrester, "you are a person of taste and imagination. Also, you have the will power of ten men; otherwise you would not dare veer away from the common flavors listed on the menu and order, straight out, without quibble or reservation, such an unheard-of thing as lime-vanilla-ice."

Ray Bradbury... you are amazing...

TimmyBoston
03-28-2007, 02:53 AM
I've read all of them. I love the sense of humor that he has given Elvis Cole. It really sets his books apart from many others in the same genre. I really enjoyed hearing more of the back story on Joe Pike, and I hope that he will continue to write novels featuring both Elvis Cole and Joe Pike as the main characters. I also like the "Prey" series by John Sandford (real name John Camp, a former Twin Cities newspaper reporter [at the Minneapolis Star Tribune I believe])featuring detective Lucas Davenport. These are especially interesting if you are familiar with the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area (I have been living an hour east of St. Paul in Wisconsin for almost a decade). Nelson DeMille also is a fantastic author. His series featuring detective John Corey is really good, but my favorite is his book "The Gold Coast". He is now working on a sequel to that one, and I am looking forward to it. He takes a little longer to come out with new books compared to some authors, but I feel the wait is worthwhile. Last but certainly not least is Vince Flynn. He lives and works in Minnesota, so he always comes on a local radio show to promote his new books. Mitch Rapp is on a par with Joe Pike as being a cool character.

I'm a big fan of Vince Flynn as well. Mitch Rapp is a great character. I'm going to have to check out the other authors you suggested. Thanks for the tips.

Porcine
03-28-2007, 05:36 AM
Forthcoming book by Burton Hersh: Bobby and J.Edgar. This is the story of the combative relationship between Robert Kennedy and J. Edgar Hoover. Plenty of unseemly stories about corrupt politics and bigtime crime, sexual escapes, etc. to hold reader's interest through its 500+ pages.

Cheers,
Porcine

qhsdoitall
03-28-2007, 09:05 AM
I hope I don't get in trouble for this.... from Dandelion Wine... by Miss Helen Loomis......

"Young man, " she said to Bill Forrester, "you are a person of taste and imagination. Also, you have the will power of ten men; otherwise you would not dare veer away from the common flavors listed on the menu and order, straight out, without quibble or reservation, such an unheard-of thing as lime-vanilla-ice."

Ray Bradbury... you are amazing...

Quote away Mama Bear, you're fine since this is not for commercial gain.

Depilator
03-28-2007, 04:10 PM
Three authors I read and re-read: Chris Buckley, Carl Hiassen and Philip Yancey. Any of their work and in no order. The first two are humor/politics[this isn't redundant] and Yancey writes about spirituality/religion. No particular logic to choices, just those things I keep going back to. Also I'm particularly impressed by Thomas Ricks' "Fiasco" and Michael Gordon's "Cobra II", both about our involvement in Iraq. The last two will take some time.

P

qhsdoitall
03-29-2007, 08:11 AM
Piers Anthony - "Key to Chroma"

prophet
04-01-2007, 10:03 AM
Piers Anthony pretty much rocks my socks. I am currently working on "Dune: The Butlerian Jihad" by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.

JBHoren
04-01-2007, 11:24 AM
I'm just about finished with William Gibson's Pattern Recognition; am one-quarter of the way through Philip Krumholz's The Complete Gillette Collector's Handbook, and am "sitting on" two others: Perfume: the story of a murderer, by Patrick Suskind, and The Emperor of Scent, by Chandler Burr.

mjrtoo
04-01-2007, 06:31 PM
I'm just about finished with William Gibson's Pattern Recognition

I read this a while ago, I wasn't all that impressed actually, Richard Morgan is way better. IMHO

Zeni
04-02-2007, 04:01 PM
Inbetween rereading Mr. Hubbard's Decalogy, which is not as good as I remember it, I just finished reading The God Delusion.

JBHoren
04-02-2007, 04:11 PM
I hope I don't get in trouble for this.... from Dandelion Wine... by Miss Helen Loomis......

"Young man, " she said to Bill Forrester, "you are a person of taste and imagination. Also, you have the will power of ten men; otherwise you would not dare veer away from the common flavors listed on the menu and order, straight out, without quibble or reservation, such an unheard-of thing as lime-vanilla-ice."

Doesn't sound so far-fetched to me; just change "lime" to "orange", and you've got yourself that very best of summertime ice-cream-on-a-stick treats: the Creamsicle.

JBHoren
04-02-2007, 04:27 PM
I read this a while ago, I wasn't all that impressed actually, Richard Morgan is way better. IMHO

Agreed, on both counts. Pattern Recognition moved too slowly, like a senior citizen doing "swimming-pool aerobics", and had too many sub-plots competing for my attention. I did like the "tone" and "focus" -- I read it as a film noir, but with 'word pictures', instead of visual ones... a softer and less-edgy "Blade Runner". It was also less jargon-ridden that his previous works of the genre, and more here-and-now; after all, the major mode of communication for Cayce and her acquaintances was via email and online forum -- how does that differ from this B&B venue (and the thousands of other like it)? Perhaps the slowness was deliberate, passively pushing me/us to (re-)read many of the segments describing Cayce and her aberrant-but-functional behavior -- I think she would have made a good wet-shaver and B&B lurker.

JBHoren
04-11-2007, 08:49 PM
I'm just about finished with William Gibson's Pattern Recognition; am one-quarter of the way through Philip Krumholz's The Complete Gillette Collector's Handbook, and am "sitting on" two others: Perfume: the story of a murderer, by Patrick Suskind, and The Emperor of Scent, by Chandler Burr.

I finished reading Perfume: the story of a murderer last week -- I found myself skimming over the "murderous" sections, and paying much closer attention to the descriptions of smell, scent, and perfume making; especially it's 18th-century context.

Now I'm about 50-pages into The Emperor of Scent: A True Story of Perfume and Obsession. Interesting... often spell-binding; all the more so, because I rarely read non-fiction. It's an enjoyable, well-written book about Dr. Luca Turin (the titular "emperor"), who believes that the nose deciphers smell by using not the shape of molecules but their vibrations. He also possesses a unique gift for scent and the ability to write about perfumes as few can.

I've also ordered The Secret of Scent: Adventures in Perfume and the Science of Smell, by Dr. Luca Turin, himself.

As Paul Harvey might say, I want to know "the rest of the story."

Good-day!

TimmyBoston
04-12-2007, 12:15 AM
I'm so happy this thread is still going strong! It's amazing to me how many readers we have here. :thumbup:

I recently finished The Brothers Bulger, the story of Billy Bulger, President of the Massachusetts State Senate and of UMass, and his brother, Whitey Bulger, head of the Irish Mob in Boston. A scary tale of both private and public corruption.

Now, I'm reading Do As I Say (Not as I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocracy by Peter Schweizer. It's very good.

Areler67
04-12-2007, 01:20 AM
At the moment I'm reading a book called Pétrole Apocalypse. It's about how we'll manage the end of oil in the world. Very interesting book but a bit too dramatic.

Porcine
04-12-2007, 05:27 AM
Just finished Richard M. Nixon, by Elizabeth Drew and am now reading, Henry Kissinger and the American Century, by Jeremi Suri. Depending where you stand on the political spectrum, you will like or dislike these.

Cheers!
Porcine

ratcheer
04-12-2007, 03:23 PM
Nothing new has appealed to me, for a while. I think I will re-read Sandy Koufax.

Tim

boboakalfb
04-12-2007, 03:43 PM
Death in the Dark Continent by Peter H. Capstick. This is my 3rd of his books and I am enjoying them very much. I have a couple others awaiting upon completion of this one.

juggler78
04-13-2007, 09:39 PM
I always have one fiction one non fiction on the go. at the moment it's
Saturday by Ian Mckewen only started but have never been disappointed.
non fiction is 1776 which is pretty good but think i've read enough on the revolutionary war recently.

amadkins
04-14-2007, 11:19 PM
Riddley Walker. I'm only about 4 chapters into it, but so far it's rit gud.

tim8557
04-15-2007, 05:55 AM
......still workin' on Lonesome Dove. It is loaded with wonderful dialogue, almost as if it were written as a screenplay.

qhsdoitall
04-17-2007, 10:24 AM
"The Runes of Earth" by Stephen R. Donaldson

Areler67
04-17-2007, 10:32 AM
At the moment, I'm reading a very very interesting book about the history of slavery called " The slave trade" from Hugh Thomas

ben27marie
04-17-2007, 10:42 AM
No deep, thought provoking books for me right now, just another novel from the always entertaining Clive Cussler, Deep Six.

moses
04-17-2007, 04:19 PM
I believe I posted here a while back. But, like I said, it's been awhile.

So. Been flying lately. Flying is just not that conducive to concentration, and I am usually bone tired when doing it, but too uncomfortable to sleep, so I need gripping, low brainpower stuff. Timeline, by MC on the way out. He is hardly a great writer at his best, and this is far from his best. Met the flying requirements and generally kept me entertained, though. The the Bourne Supremacy on the way back. Better feel for language than MC, but he tries to hard from time to time.

Otherwise, in the middle of Absolom, Absolom, by Faukner. It's actually a really brilliantly crafted story, in terms of plot and story telling. Just perfect. If someone else had written it following the same pattern it would be impossible to put down. Given the density of his language though, it is easy to loose sight of that. Going from that to the general mass market thriller writers really highlights the difference between competence and genius, though.

Also have been reading Look Howard Angel. See last sentence above. And yes, I seem to be on the start of a Southern novelist kick. Maybe I will kick it a little more modern with a Robert Penn Warren next. Not sure he is in the same league though, in general, excepting All The King's Men, which was a transcendent accomplishment.

-Mo

moses
04-17-2007, 04:29 PM
This reminds me.

I am looking for an easily found but relatively good author of suspense, spy, crime etc. novels, a la Tom Clancy. I love a Clancy for airplanes, or just evenings when I want something entertaining, escapist, and not remotely hard. Ludlum is ok, but just ok for me. I was on a Grisham kick for a while, but I've read most of his stuff, and besides, he is a really bad writer.

Mystery Detective genre would be good too. There is a brit I really like named Martha Grimes, but her books, while many in number, are hard to find in, airport book stores, used book shops and (my favorite) thrift stores. Note, I refuse to pay anything like retail for a book I am going to read once, and toss (well, pass along to someone else, somehow, really). Unless I am in the airport, and thus desperate. So I guess what I am saying is ideally someone quite popular.

-Mo

JBHoren
04-17-2007, 04:44 PM
Mystery Detective genre would be good too. There is a brit I really like named Martha Grimes, but her books, while many in number, are hard to find in, airport book stores, used book shops and (my favorite) thrift stores. Note, I refuse to pay anything like retail for a book I am going to read once, and toss (well, pass along to someone else, somehow, really). Unless I am in the airport, and thus desperate. So I guess what I am saying is ideally someone quite popular.

Go down, Moses!

I recommend a series of detective novelettes by Stuart Kaminsky, but those with his Arkady Renko anti-hero. Also, anything in the Nero Wolfe series of detective stories. Finally, there is a series of Butch Karp NYC DA novels, by Robert K. Tanenbaum -- I heartily recommend them (with the proviso that you read them chronologically... especially the earlier ones).

But I dearly love the Arkady Renko ones.

Oh! anything in the DKA: Files series by Joe Gores!!!! They are effing brilliant (and I own copies of them all!)

johnniegold
04-17-2007, 05:17 PM
Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon Schama.

Emilius
04-19-2007, 09:36 AM
Hello gents,

I am currently reading Nostromo, by Joseph Conrad. About to finish it.

I've never had trouble reading English literature, but his prose, albeit perfectly English, is so complicated that leaves the reader feeling there's something non-English to it: too many subordinate sentences, triple comparisons, etc. I've read in the introduction that it is not so much a matter of his Polish origins as the fact that English was the third foreign language he learnt, and was thus influenced by the previous two. But once I'd read one third, I began to read it more naturally.

Oh, the plot is great. Social and political turmoil in 19th-century South America. Dictatorship, revolution, upheaval, populism. Were it not for the timeframe, it could, sadly, represent some countries of today.

Darkening Fire
04-21-2007, 09:57 PM
Just finished Cormac McCarthy's The Road. A tight, intense, dark comedy (in the Shakespearean sense of the word).
My copy had a big "Oprah Book Club" selection stamp on it. Don't let that dissuade you.

Next up is a re-read of Somerset Maugham's Of Human Bondage.

moses
04-21-2007, 11:03 PM
Next up is a re-read of Somerset Maugham's Of Human Bondage.

Not read that one, but D@MN the man can write. His command of the langauge and story is just amazing. Pretty darn easy to read too.

-Mo

MCsommerreid
04-21-2007, 11:23 PM
Number of the Beast by Robert Heinlein.

Considering how into the previous Future History series I was (Methuselahs Children, Cat Who Walks Through Walls, et al Lazarus Long), I really can't seem to get into this one.

TimmyBoston
04-21-2007, 11:52 PM
I'm just getting into A Conspiracy of Paper by David Liss. It's a historical thriller, that I'm really enjoying.

TimmyBoston
04-21-2007, 11:55 PM
My copy had a big "Oprah Book Club" selection stamp on it. Don't let that dissuade you.


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

rtaylor61
04-22-2007, 12:17 AM
In celebration of his passing, I am re-reading Kurt Vonnegut. Today, "Cat's Cradle". Tomorrow, I start "Slaughterhouse Five".

Randy

qhsdoitall
04-22-2007, 04:34 PM
Number of the Beast by Robert Heinlein.

Considering how into the previous Future History series I was (Methuselahs Children, Cat Who Walks Through Walls, et al Lazarus Long), I really can't seem to get into this one.


Have it. Liked it. It was kind of formulic and I read it a very long time ago so, I guess I need to re-read it just to see if I still like it.

Frank7580
04-23-2007, 12:48 PM
Someone mentioned the Book Black by Ted Dekker several weeks ago. I finished this first book in the trilogy and have continued with Red.

Escapist fiction for sure, but the books are quite interesting, fast-paced and contain short chapters (so they're easy to pick up and put down). A big plus when much of my reading time occurs just before I fall asleep.

ScottS
04-24-2007, 01:22 PM
What with recent news, and a fortuitous happenstance at the library, I'm reading a recent annotated version of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

sparkchaser
04-24-2007, 02:03 PM
What with recent news, and a fortuitous happenstance at the library, I'm reading a recent annotated version of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Do the annotations lend anything to the story?

ScottS
04-25-2007, 06:03 AM
The annotations are by Henry Louis Gates and Hollis Robbins (http://www.amazon.com/Annotated-Uncle-Toms-Cabin/dp/0393059464/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-7085468-6275047?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1177505717&sr=8-1). Some of them are quite good, filling in the politics of the mid 19th century and providing a lot of context for Stowe's work. They also clue the modern reader into the popular literary devices of the time. Eva's sensitivity, for example, is portrayed in a way that the contemporary reader knew from the moment she appeared that she wasn't long for the world.

Some of them aren't very useful to me. Sometimes, when bored by a section, its a little comforting to read that the annotators are bored as well, though.

Another interesting bit is that they've gathered illustrations from many illustrated versions over 150 years. The contrasting images of the same scenes are very interesting.

This happens to be from a great series of annotated books. I've read a version of Alice in Wonderland from this series, and I have a Sherlock Holmes that's next on the list.

In a similar vein, the Criterion Collection DVD for The Seven Samurai has a commentary track by a Kurasawa expert that is an absolute must hear, especially to the viewer who can't make use of the Japanese dialog anyway.

patrisVII
04-25-2007, 07:06 AM
The Beatles by Bob Spitz

sparkchaser
04-25-2007, 10:31 AM
Only 75 pages to go until I finish "You Shall Know Our Velocity" then I will run, not walk, to get Tolkein's "The Children of Húrin".

daniel
04-25-2007, 01:39 PM
At the moment I'm reading "Savage Wars of Peace," by Max Boot, "Carnage and Culture," by Victor David Hanson, "American Colonies," by Alan Taylor, and the last fiction that I have read was The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

I will say that "Carnage and Culture" is a good counter-point to Jared Diamond. If you really want to get various viewpoints as to why some societies succeed and others fail then you need to read a little of both authors. Diamond is going to give you the ecological/geographical side of things, while Hanson is going to give you a cultural slant to things. Both interesting reads. Of course, there are tons of books about this topic, but these are pretty popular and recent books.

Johnny_Z
04-28-2007, 10:59 PM
I'm just getting into A Conspiracy of Paper by David Liss. It's a historical thriller, that I'm really enjoying.

Good stuff, I liked the three of his that I read (I'm not sure if he's written a 4th yet).

Currently I'm reading Born in Blood. It's about Templars and Freemasons and all that good stuff.

TimmyBoston
04-29-2007, 12:29 AM
Rereading The Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. It's a comic book, but ranks up there with any novel I've ever read, sheer brilliance.

rtaylor61
04-29-2007, 12:35 AM
Tomorrow I start "We Are All Welcome Here" by Elizabeth Berg. Yeah, she is chick writer, but I have enjoyed every one of her books.

Randy

TimmyBoston
04-29-2007, 01:09 AM
Tomorrow I start "We Are All Welcome Here" by Elizabeth Berg. Yeah, she is chick writer, but I have enjoyed every one of her books.

Randy

You just like it because you like the chicks. :biggrin:

rtaylor61
04-29-2007, 01:12 AM
You just like it because you like the chicks. :biggrin:

I first read "Open House" after I was divorced. It struck a chord with me. Since then, I've read most of her books. Chick books or not ,they are well written and a good read.

Randy

Soapmistress
04-29-2007, 11:08 AM
Hey Everybody!

I'm down and out with a bad knee at the moment, but the good news is, it's giving me a chance to visit here at B&B. I just found this thread for books :w00t: I do love my books!

The "Year of Wonders" by Geraldine Brooks is excellent if you like historical peices ( and this isn't a harlequin romance...lol ) The story is set in the year 1666...the year of the plague, when a bolt of infected cloth from London is carried to an isolated village.......

National Best Seller list...commentaries from several ranging from The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, and the one I liked from Publisher Weekly.....

"With an intensely observant eye, a rigorous regard for period detail, and assured, elegant prose, Brooks re-creates a year in the life of a remote British village decimated by the bubonic plague....This poignant and powerful account carries the pulsing beat of sensitive imagination and the challenge of moral complexity"

Ok....and just one more, cuz yeah....it really is that good;

" An astonishing re-creation of how if felt to be a victim and survivor of the year of wonders and horrors. Vivid in its humanity, immediate in its narrative, it confirms in compelling terms the universal vulnerability of humankind, and the wonder of survival" ---------Thomas Keneally, author of Schindler's List and The Great Shame: The Triumph of the Irish in the English-Speaking World.

Colleen

bpatton
04-29-2007, 11:11 AM
Callamari and Perillo on contracts...not by choice

Stauff
04-29-2007, 11:45 AM
Heinrich Böll, War letters 1939-1945. Highly Interesting.

PalmettoB
04-29-2007, 01:09 PM
Napoleon's Pyramids by William Dietrich.

JBHoren
04-29-2007, 01:24 PM
I'm paused about one-quarter of the way through The Emperor of Scent, by Chandler Burr; I found it so interesting, that I ordered my own copy and returned the borrowed one to the public library.

On the recommendation of Tat2niner, I picked-up a used copy of Plain Speaking: an oral biography of Harry S. Truman, by Merle Miller. It's based on Miller's hours and hours of conversation with the late President Truman, while filming a neither finished nor broadcast series of shows about him. I like it; it's an open and inviting window into a time and place where I didn't grow-up, and a look at people who weren't my relatives or my parents' friends. I think a person could've done a lot worse, than to grow-up in Independence, MO. I mainly read it while I'm eating, and I find myself enjoying my meals a bit more than usual... perhaps it's the slower pace.

It would be great to listen to the recordings of those conversations, while working-out on the elliptical trainer!

flippantfig
04-29-2007, 02:46 PM
Rereading The Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. It's a comic book, but ranks up there with any novel I've ever read, sheer brilliance.

Alan Moore is outstanding!

Meanwhile, I'm chipping away at Umberto Eco's 'The name of the rose'.

Phog Allen
04-29-2007, 04:22 PM
Hi Tim. Books, books, books. I love them. While in my teens and early twenties, I was a voracious reader. It was nothing to finish a paperback novel in an evening but I would usually extend it to two nights. I love most fantasy work though I must confess I limit to stuff that is from worlds or times long ago when men still walked or rode horses wherever they went. Edged weapons are a must. I love Celtic, Anglo, and Germanic history. Novels based on that would be great. Especially the Middle Ages(I refuse to call that period Dark Ages. I think Charlemagne would have argued that with you as well.) Sherlock Holmes is always good. I like some of the real life crime books. I recently finished Patricia Cornwell's "Portrait of a Killer". It's her take on the White Chapel murders. Very good stuff. At times clinical but VERY convincing. I have recently re-read The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. I'd forgotten just how good these books were. No wonder young people still flock to them. Tolkien is a favourite as well. In addition to the Lord of the Rings saga, the works edited and published posthumoulsly by his son Christopher are to be explored. The Silmarillion sounds very good. Others I really want to explore is The History of English Speaking Peoples by Churchill and The Rough Riders, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman, and Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail by Theodore Roosevelt. Teddy was our beloved American Lion and a real arse kicker. Good westerns by L'Amour are always worth reading. Right now I'm finishing book 7 of the Chronicles of Narnia.

Regards Todd

peter322
05-01-2007, 07:47 PM
I'm a fanatic reader as well, and have been since around the 4th grade. Right now, I'm re-reading Raise High the Roofbeam, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction (J.D. Salinger). I've also just started to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain) and Defining a Nation: Our America and the Sources of its Strength (edited by Halberstam, RIP). A book I look forward to reading next is Stumbling On Happiness (Gilbert), it looks very interesting.

bababoosky
05-02-2007, 04:27 AM
Just picked up The Alienist by Caleb Carr to read on the beach next week in the Bahamas :)

scruffy
05-02-2007, 12:43 PM
Just read Jack London's Sea Wolf. It was an excellent read. Will try some of Chesterton's Fr Brown next.

qhsdoitall
05-02-2007, 12:59 PM
"Soul of the Fire" by Terry Goodkind

ratcheer
05-02-2007, 03:57 PM
Just picked up The Alienist by Caleb Carr to read on the beach next week in the Bahamas :)

Great book, I read it several years ago. :thumbup1:

Tim

icemncmth
05-02-2007, 05:05 PM
I am reading

"The Keep" by F Paul Wilson....It is a great book..


I read a lot of books...and this one is good..

I like fiction.......any good books I need to read?

TimmyBoston
05-02-2007, 05:15 PM
Just started A Question of Blood by Ian Rankin

The first book I've ever read of Rankin's but I'm enjoying it thus far.

Richard
05-02-2007, 05:55 PM
In celebration of his passing, I am re-reading Kurt Vonnegut. Today, "Cat's Cradle". Tomorrow, I start "Slaughterhouse Five".


Just finished "Slaughterhouse Five." My first Vonnegut book. I found it interesting and will probably read something else by him.

“If man could be crossed with a cat it would improve man, but it would deteriorate the cat.” – Mark Twain

ouch
05-02-2007, 07:11 PM
De Motu Corporum in Gyrum, but it's only nine pages.

Argus
05-02-2007, 07:14 PM
I'm reading "Rollback" by Robert J. Sawyer.

Excellent SciFi writer.


Sean

peacefrog
05-02-2007, 07:49 PM
I finished Twinkie Deconstructed last night. I'm not sure when I'll eat another Twinkie. We eat very little in the way of processed foods.

Today I've started reading the New Testament. I haven't touched it since high school religion class in the early 1980s. I'm not Christian, but it's such a culturally significant book that I thought I ought to give it a read.

TimmyBoston
05-10-2007, 08:35 PM
I just began Jonathan Kellerman's Obsession

michaelskar
05-10-2007, 09:35 PM
Just started book one of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series (eye of the world)...I'm not that big of a "fantasy guy," but I was in a Hobbit-ish mood and this book has been quite enjoyable so far.

Xert
05-11-2007, 01:56 AM
Re-reading Rousseau's Julie at the moment. What a brilliant "little" novel it is.

izlat
05-11-2007, 05:37 AM
Just finished The Westing Game - nothing to write home about but decent. I read many books at the same time - getting bored with The Dialogues of Luisa Sigea (don't think I'll finish it any time soon). Going through couple of plays by Pinter (which I had forgotten I read years ago :redface: ), can't quite finish Psychoanalytic Theries of Development. A couple of French authors.

At least I am keeping up with what my 9yo daughter is reading just to know what's up. I try to read most of what she reads.

Cheers
Ivo

ScottS
05-11-2007, 05:55 AM
Just started book one of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series (eye of the world)...I'm not that big of a "fantasy guy," but I was in a Hobbit-ish mood and this book has been quite enjoyable so far.

That's a nice series. I think I read the first five or six before I lost track.

BD1970
05-11-2007, 07:24 AM
I'm not much of a reader but I'm almost finished reading the Bible cover to cover. Once I finish, I'll probably read it again...

JBHoren
05-11-2007, 07:53 AM
Previously, I wrote that I'd put my reading of Raymond Carr's The Emperor of Scent on "hold", and returned the borrowed book to the public library, pending receipt of a "previously read" copy from an Amazon seller.

Well, it's been a month and the book still hasn't arrived. I wrote the seller, but received no reply. I do not understand why Amazon doesn't show you buyer feedback for these sellers before you purchase from them.

Warning! Do not buy from Oharasbooks.

Thomas
05-11-2007, 10:01 AM
Sorry to hear about your experience with Emperor of Scent, particularly since I have that book on the fixin-to-read stack. The first few pages were really good.

Recently finished and highly recommended: A Dirty Job (C. Moore)
Just finished: Little Green Men (C. Buckley)
Just started: Marcovaldo (I. Calvino)

Mrs. T just boxed up a slew of books and sent them to storage with the understanding that I would hold off on buying more books. Well, the stack is rising again...

JohnP
05-11-2007, 10:09 PM
FWIW

I also got hooked by the Wheel of Time series; apparently the next one will be the last in the series, from what I hear Robert Jordan is terminally ill, and will likely not have time to write any more. Regardless, a great escape from the clutches of reality, sometimes just the thing.
John P.

daniel
05-12-2007, 03:22 AM
Just started book one of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series (eye of the world)...I'm not that big of a "fantasy guy," but I was in a Hobbit-ish mood and this book has been quite enjoyable so far.

Good series. :thumbup1:

knlgskr
05-12-2007, 04:02 AM
"The War that made America"; a short history of the French and Indian War by Fred Anderson. I tend to read non-fiction and about anything that strikes my fancy.

Richard

daniel
05-12-2007, 04:36 AM
"The War that made America"; a short history of the French and Indian War by Fred Anderson. I tend to read non-fiction and about anything that strikes my fancy.

Richard

I'll have to pick that one up. :smile:

steveo
05-13-2007, 11:12 AM
For the past couple of months i've been reading Ian Fleming's early James Bond novels.I started with his first (Casino Royale) and have read them in order and have just recently started Goldfinger.These books are amazingly well written and give a fascinating insight into British consciousness in the 1950s.Forget your pre-conceptions of Bond films and try one of his books.I must honestly say Ian Fleming is one of the best and most descriptive writers I have ever read.His books truly deserve to be labelled "classics" and have given me hours of pleasure.Oh and of course we all want to be James Bond eh?