PDA

View Full Version : Lodge 7QT Dutch Oven & Wagner #10 Skillet



Topgumby
09-07-2009, 07:57 PM
I'm addicted to these two hunks of cast iron.

I've got a family of four, and between the modern Lodge dutch oven and the vintage Wagner skillet I think if I had to, I could almost get by with just these two. Throw in a 12qt stockpot, and it's all covered.

My nonstick pans get very little use anymore.

Any other cast iron fans here?

tsmba
09-08-2009, 06:37 AM
We used to use those Dutch ovens in Scouts to make cobbler. At home, I use enameled cast iron. A cast iron skillet, though is a "must have" in any kitchen. Do you clean your stuff with only salt and paper towels? I know that is the preferred way, but its very difficult to get baked-on gunk off without a good scrubbing.

Topgumby
09-08-2009, 09:58 PM
I'll use kosher salt and paper towels for light cleaning, but for the really gunky crud, I'll


Use warm water and a mild dish soap. I always dry with heat afterwords, then apply a light coat of bacon grease.
Scrape with a metal spatula.
Do both.


I've yet to screw up the seasoning doing this. The one time I stripped the seosoning on cast iron was when cooking tomatoes on the Lodge factory seasoning. I cussed a little, got over it and re-seasoned. No problems since.

The way I figure it, cast iron cookware and wetshaving kind of belong together.:smile:

SilkySmooth
09-09-2009, 01:41 AM
I scrub the heck out of mine with steel wool and warm water, then towel dry, wipe with a little cooking oil and set it back in the oven at 350 degrees for at least 10 min.

tsmba
09-09-2009, 06:55 AM
I do pretty much the same...though purists sometimes claim anything other than salt will screw up the seasoning. I've never been able to eliminate good old soap and water.

_JP_
09-09-2009, 07:37 AM
If anything, salt can actually help create the seasoning. I witnessed that happening with aluminum sheet pans in the restaurant. Those pans stayed shiny for years until we added baked potatoes to the menu. The potatoes were oiled and sprinkled with kosher salt. The sheet pans that they were cooked on soon developed that black seasoning coating on them that was so tough that it took pretty much a sander to remove it. It didn't happen to pans that had oily foods on them, it was those salted potatoes that created the coating.

I have some cast iron that I use regularly. A 10 inch Lodge skillet, and #6 Wagoner skillet. Of unknown makes there is also a 4qt iron pot with lid and a pancake skillet.

kzoo1
09-09-2009, 07:38 AM
Teflon has no place in my kitchen any more.

We only use cast iron, enamel coated cast iron, aluminum, and stainless.

We really love the lodge dutch oven, and the Le Creuset Doufeu (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012Q6IES).

Jwolf24601
09-09-2009, 10:20 AM
5 qt lodge dutch oven (no legs or charcoal lip)
2 12" Lodge Skillets

and a 10" Griswold Skillet, very nice antique, much thinner/lighter than the lodge pans.

mainaman
09-09-2009, 10:23 AM
12" Lorge skillet,
also
8" black steel pan.
my two best nonstickers so far.

htownmmm
09-09-2009, 11:21 AM
Absolutely! How else could I prepare authentic gumbo and jambalaya? Non stick is equivalent to mach x/quattro whatever in my kitchen.


marty

Deltaboy
09-09-2009, 11:44 AM
I have #4 ,#6, #8, #10 and a #12 that are 70+ years old, A Dutch oven over 85 years old and cornbread stick pans that over 100 years old.

Thanks to my Grandmothers who thinned out their Cast Iron collection abou 3 years ago. :001_smile

Topgumby
09-09-2009, 07:12 PM
Nice to know I'm not the only cast iron junkie here.

Very cool to hear about the vintage stuff. I think this calls for a pineapple upsidedown cake in the #10 skillet tommorow...:tongue_sm

tsmba
09-10-2009, 07:05 AM
Teflon always ended up flaking off the pans. Newer non-stick surfaces are far better. I have a good non-stick skillet. They have their uses.

Leche
09-10-2009, 07:53 AM
With the exception of a couple of small pots cast iron is all I use. I never use soap just a stiff nylon scrub brush and hot water, dry and heat the iron and a light coat of veg oil. For heavy cleaning or after making something with a distinct odor I will boil water in it then scrub.

Houndawg
09-10-2009, 08:13 PM
My best cast iron skillet is an old ring-bottomed Wagner. It's over 75 years old. It's black as coal and slicker than snot inside. Cooking bacon does wonders to cast iron.

Jim
09-10-2009, 08:24 PM
I have a fairly large dutch oven for about 25 years. Its got a #10 and D, made in the USA on the bottom. Been to more than a few deer camps and camping trips as well as the cook top at Casa del Goose. Its an old friend, a more recent acquisition is a 12" steel pan.

Mordecai
11-11-2009, 02:55 AM
I do most of my cooking in the following:
Lodge 12" skillet
Lodge 5qt dutch oven
Martin No.8 deep fry pan w/ lid

chainfire
11-11-2009, 03:35 AM
I too amaddicted to cast iron for some reason & use it almost exclusively. Some cast iron pans and a steel wok are about all you'll ever need.

Kouros
11-11-2009, 04:33 AM
I clean cast iron only with water and a stiff brush, never soap. Then, coat in cooking spray and wipe with a paper towel. The older the pan, the better flavor it imparts to food and the more non-stick it becomes. Soap depletes those benefits.

Rughi
11-11-2009, 09:11 AM
I love my Lodge 9 Quart Dutch (http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showpost.php?p=1584343&postcount=28) that I got several months back for both stovetop and outdoor cooking. I've also used 3 sizes of skillets (#6 I think, #10 and #12) for many happy years.

Well-cared for cast iron gives up very little to those grossly flaking and probably carcinogenic non-stick coatings that ephemeral cookware touts.

Roger

Short Round
11-11-2009, 08:58 PM
I got my share of cast iron.

No name cast iron 9" frying pan that is 3 generations old. A 10" my neighbor gave me that was a wedding gift to her 40 years ago. She also gave me a 5 qt dutch oven.

I also have a 4 qt and a 6qt Lodge camp dutch oven with the feet and flanged lid. I can make a mean pinapple upside down cape in them.

The only cast iron pan that I really didn't like was the grill pan I bought on a whim because I missed having a grill. It's PITA to clean after using.

One of my favorite dishes is pan fried steak with a shallot and cream sherry sauce. Cream sherry or marsala fortified wine can really wow a dish for me.

jadam318
11-11-2009, 09:01 PM
I'll admit, I didn't read every post in this thread, so this may not flow with the conversation.

I LOVE cast iron stuff. I swore off non-stick fry pans over a year ago. I have a 10" and 6" Lodge skillets and a 4 qt dutch oven. I cook mostly just for me (not married or anything), so that's all I really need. The seasoning is screwed up on my dutch oven, though. I haven't been using it lately. I may have done something wrong, but the whole thing is sticky, like it has been covered in super glue or something. You don't have any suggestions, do you?

mmack66
11-11-2009, 09:05 PM
Is cast iron cookware usable on a glass top range?

Short Round
11-11-2009, 09:11 PM
I'll admit, I didn't read every post in this thread, so this may not flow with the conversation.

I LOVE cast iron stuff. I swore off non-stick fry pans over a year ago. I have a 10" and 6" Lodge skillets and a 4 qt dutch oven. I cook mostly just for me (not married or anything), so that's all I really need. The seasoning is screwed up on my dutch oven, though. I haven't been using it lately. I may have done something wrong, but the whole thing is sticky, like it has been covered in super glue or something. You don't have any suggestions, do you?

That's old oil that's congealed. You can burn it off or boil it off. That's how the two pieces I got from my neighbor were. Tacky oil with cat hair stuck to it.:scared: I was going to strip that down before touching food to that.

IIRC I hit it with a green scrubbie in the sink with hot water until I couldn't get anything else off. Then I put them in the oven and basically overheated the oil until it carbonized. Let them cool a bit, then I did two coats of bacon grease and put them in the oven 30 minutes each time.

JoeH
11-11-2009, 09:18 PM
Cast iron is wonderful stuff. Love the traditional stuff and also the enameled. I just don't think you can improve on it.

senorsignor
11-11-2009, 09:19 PM
I only have one Lodge skillet, but it is my favorite. One thing I've learned is that a lard seasoning is MUCH more effective than vegetable oil. The lard provided a much darker, longer lasting, and better stick-free surface. How do you guys season your cast iron?

Topgumby
11-11-2009, 09:57 PM
... but the whole thing is sticky, like it has been covered in super glue or something. You don't have any suggestions, do you? I've heard that you can strip cast iron by letting it sit through a self cleaning oven cycle. I've not done it, but it stands to reason. Scrubbing the sticky stuff off is another, more tedious option.


I only have one Lodge skillet, but it is my favorite. One thing I've learned is that a lard seasoning is MUCH more effective than vegetable oil. The lard provided a much darker, longer lasting, and better stick-free surface. How do you guys season your cast iron?

I agree that fat is better for cast iron than Pam or vegetable oil. I keep a jar of bacon grease in the fridge, and it really keeps the seasoning in top shape.

I season a new or stripped piece by warming on the range, giving a light, all over coat of bacon grease and then baking upside down in a 350 degree oven for one hour. I let it sit in the oven while it cools.

You can repeat a few times for a more durable coating, or simply just use the pan for bacon a few times before subjecting it to something acidic like tomato sauces.

oldandcrotchety
11-12-2009, 05:06 AM
That's old oil that's congealed. You can burn it off or boil it off. That's how the two pieces I got from my neighbor were. Tacky oil with cat hair stuck to it.:scared: I was going to strip that down before touching food to that.

IIRC I hit it with a green scrubbie in the sink with hot water until I couldn't get anything else off. Then I put them in the oven and basically overheated the oil until it carbonized. Let them cool a bit, then I did two coats of bacon grease and put them in the oven 30 minutes each time.

Yep. In agreement with that. Another thing you can do is to toss it into a fireplace or campfire. After the fire is out and the iron is cool, you will basically have a virgin skillet. Other than 2 small sauce pans, all I have is cast iron. The thing that is used the most is a round griddle. Hardly a day goes by without a flour tortilla being heated up on it. I use only olive oil on the griddle. As far as seasoning a skillet or dutch oven, I put enough oil in them to easily float stuff and then use them like deep fryer for a few days without even draining the oil. Just leave on stove, covered. Always works for me better than oven method. New cast iron usually says it comes fully seasoned. HAH!!

Rughi
11-12-2009, 07:41 AM
I only have one Lodge skillet, but it is my favorite. One thing I've learned is that a lard seasoning is MUCH more effective than vegetable oil. The lard provided a much darker, longer lasting, and better stick-free surface. How do you guys season your cast iron?

I've heard that lard is bad for you, so I use Manteca.
Works every bit as well!

Roger

jadam318
11-12-2009, 08:15 AM
Thanks for all the info, fellas. I'll be working on my little dutch oven tonight. I was afraid I had ruined it somehow.



Is cast iron cookware usable on a glass top range?

No. At least that's what my mom and step dad tell me. My step dad is a building contractor and know a lot about appliances. I don't know what happens if you use on glass top, though. I'm sure it wouldn't hurt the cast iron.

texbilly
11-12-2009, 08:24 AM
My 12" skillet is a favorite. As previously stated, there is not reason to use non-stick when you have cast iron. Not to mention the elimination of whatever chemicals we're told might harm us this week. I never use soap and only scrub with hot water and a soft brush and that's only if it's really messed up. I have relatives who do nothing other than pour off any accumulated fat!

my19
11-12-2009, 12:57 PM
I clean cast iron only with water and a stiff brush, never soap. Then, coat in cooking spray and wipe with a paper towel. The older the pan, the better flavor it imparts to food and the more non-stick it becomes. Soap depletes those benefits.

+1. I have to wait for my mother-in-law to leave the kitchen before I clean my cast iron skillets and Dutch oven. She'd be horrified that I don't squirt 'em with soap.

Of course, my great fear is she'll decide to use one of the pans someday, and will clean it for me. :scared:

homebrewer
11-13-2009, 08:06 AM
Is cast iron cookware usable on a glass top range?

I use mine on a flat glass cooktop, and it works just fine. The only problem is that they take forever to heat up. The only problem I've had with it is that the cured outside of the pan tends to leave residual cure/oil on the glass cook top that gets burned on. It is most an asthetic problem, as it does scrub off fairly easily from the glass with a little baking soda.

I'll put it this way, my apartment has a glass cook top, and with the exception of my 4 gallon SS stock pot, the only cookware that I use is my great-grandmother's Wagner 10", and two de Buyer black steel pans. I've been doing that for 3 years now, 2 meals a day, without any harm to cook top of cookware.

jadam318
11-13-2009, 08:39 AM
I use mine on a flat glass cooktop, and it works just fine. The only problem is that they take forever to heat up. The only problem I've had with it is that the cured outside of the pan tends to leave residual cure/oil on the glass cook top that gets burned on. It is most an asthetic problem, as it does scrub off fairly easily from the glass with a little baking soda.

I'll put it this way, my apartment has a glass cook top, and with the exception of my 4 gallon SS stock pot, the only cookware that I use is my great-grandmother's Wagner 10", and two de Buyer black steel pans. I've been doing that for 3 years now, 2 meals a day, without any harm to cook top of cookware.

Maybe it's not as big a deal as I thought it was. Next time I talk to my folks I'll ask them where they heard different and maybe why you're not supposed to.

WhosYerBob
11-13-2009, 10:22 AM
Big cast iron fan here as well. I only use Lodge - none of that light weight "cast iron" junk that comes from elsewhere. My wife likes what is cooked in cast iron, but it's too heavy for her wrists when being picked up or moved so she uses the Teflon stuff. But I always use cast iron when I cook.

Mr. Imperial
12-06-2009, 12:29 PM
Wow, very happy to see so many cast iron junkies here. Thanks to my brother (who gave me my first safety razor) and Food Network (who gave me Alton Brown), I now have several AD's.

Right now I'm learning the intricacy of my 12" Lodge skillet. Just cooked a ridiculously good meat loaf two days ago, now trying my hand at home-made mac+cheese.

Also - check out cookingincastiron.com for recipe trials, product reviews, etc. The guy's a great teacher!

jackmormon
12-06-2009, 12:34 PM
This thread spurred me to purchase a 12" Lodge skillett with lid and a Lodge enameled 6 qt dutch oven about two months ago.

Never used cast iron cookware before....now it is my favorite.

B&B has been edumacating me on a lot more than shaving ;)

Thanks guys!

Topgumby
12-06-2009, 01:20 PM
Glad to see that some folks have been open to try the "old" tech of cast iron.

Had a friend give me a Wagner large logo 10" and an 8" to season and keep for him, on a sort of extended lend.

Today I used both 10" skillets to make short work of a package of bacon and two batches of scrambled eggs, one with Rooster sauce and powdered Habenero and one without the heat for the bride and youngest boy. Quick hot water cleanup and they are good to go.

Between the DE shaving, cast Iron and the interest in older music, my wife thinks I might be taking retro too far...

_JP_
12-06-2009, 06:40 PM
Between the DE shaving, cast Iron and the interest in older music, my wife thinks I might be taking retro too far...

You're not taking it far enough. Visit the fedora lounge for some ideas. :lol:

I picked up a small 2 cup sized cast iron pot with with lid a few weeks back. Perfect on the grill for keeping a basting sauce warm!

BobS
12-10-2009, 02:31 PM
I have two skillets that I use mostly on my grills to make blackened fish. I am not sure why I don't use them more indoors.

langod
12-13-2009, 05:06 AM
I have a 10" Griswold pan that is my most used kitchen instrument outside of my Chef's Knife. It's well over 100 years old, having belonged to my great-grandmother in the late 1800s. It's so well seasoned, that I have never had to scrub anything "burned on" of of it -- literally a quick swish with a metal scrubbie pad is as aggressive as I have ever needed.

JohnDoom
12-17-2009, 02:35 PM
I STILL need to purchase a cast iron skillet. I just need to confirm that what you're all saying is I won't have scrambled eggs sticking to my pans if they're seasoned properly?

langod
12-18-2009, 04:56 AM
I STILL need to purchase a cast iron skillet. I just need to confirm that what you're all saying is I won't have scrambled eggs sticking to my pans if they're seasoned properly?

Yes, that is basically true. However, it may take a while before proper seasoning is established. It took several months for my cast iron griddle to become decently non-stick. Be patient, don't give up.
(The end reslt is worth it -- my 100+ year old pan is far slicker than any "non-stick" I've used, but of course, you probably don't want to wait that long! :001_tongu )
I haven't used any of Lodge's new "pre-seasoned" skillets, but it should help quite a bit.

Just follow the ideas above for seasoning and maintaining, and you'll be all set.

ouch
12-18-2009, 05:56 AM
I still say that carbon steel pans are the best for cooking eggs.

Cast iron is a wonderful and useful tool- grandma was right.

Topgumby
12-19-2009, 06:49 PM
What my cast iron is doing for me tonight...

Cut up a fryer, browned it over medium high heat in a couple splashes of EVOO in the Wagner #10. Salt and pepper, throw in a bunch of thyme and the peeled cloves from three heads of garlic with about a half cup more olive oil and throw in that 350 degree oven for about an hour or so with the lid from the Lodge dutch oven on top of the old skillet.

I love that fourty clove garlic chicken, and I'll spread that garlic over toast and just revel in the stuff.

Tonight will be a Lilac Vegetal shave, just to combat the garlic smell. :blink::thumbup:

Suzuki
12-19-2009, 07:03 PM
I have a Lodge 10" and a dutch oven - some of the best additions to my kitchen and, a joke in terms of price.

I don't do a ton of frying, but I love pan roasting just about anything that clucks, grunts or moos.

As for cleaning, I try to use a stiff brush and warm water.

watchhillian
12-20-2009, 02:19 PM
We cook a lot and I have a big collection of cast iron skillets/pots/dutch ovens, some new from Lodge and some old out of antique stores. I live in New England, so there's always a lot of inventory classified as antique.

We also have many All Clad pots and pans in both stick and non stick. These are my wife's favorite, and they do serve a purpose. She likes the non stick the best, and the stick gets the least use. The non stick is sort of fragile and you've got to watch it.

All Clad is expensive, but we shop for what we need at TJ Max and HomeGoods, where a $200+ pot or pan can be for sale for less than $50. Got one of their pizza pans that way. All Clad is the best stainless gear IMHO.

Still, cast iron is so cool for it's utility and cost. Cheap and durable. And there's some things cooked in cast iron no other type of pan can beat. Fried Chicken in the Lodge 14" Deep Skillet, for example, only $33 and heavy duty. https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/product1_new.asp?menu=logic&idProduct=3925

It's great when the pan is so well seasoned the cooking surface is like an ice rink.

The reason they call it a Dutch Oven, BTW, is way back the main source of iron ore was from mines controlled by the Dutch. They had some sort of monopoly on it for a period of time and aluminum hadn't been invented yet.

Nice Thread.

Olive Drab
12-20-2009, 02:26 PM
I was given a 12" anda grill pan "emeril brand" as a gift but i have been using them every week for something, and I have been happy with the results, mainly the crisp exterior of the meat or potatoes cooked in it.

tejasjeff
12-29-2009, 02:52 PM
I have probably 10 pieces running from Recent to a Century Old. If inanimate objects actually can bring happiness,cast iron comes closer than just about anything else.
Lodge makes a good piece but sheesh they seem excessively heavy on some models.
Why are the older ones often lighter and easier to handle?
I often advise folks to hunt around antique shops if they are not in a hurry.
Also, the actual surface itself are not as high quality as in the past.
Lodge at one time tacitly acknowledged this and sold a "machined" skillet that was extra smooth for a additional amount.
If you are going to buy a Lodge 10 or 12 inch skillet,spring for the lid they sell
alongside of it!
God knows I love my Le Creuset Dutch Ovens, but often you don't need to feed a crowd and the lids turns your skillet into a mini dutch oven.
As stated above,Bacon is the gold standard for whipping a lodge into shape.
A drop of soap isn't going to ruin the seasoning or give off putting tastes to your food. Just don't go nuts with it.
Buy it ,start frying bacon until its blacker than Hades and you are well on the way to creating a piece of family history.