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Phog Allen
08-29-2009, 10:18 AM
Good afternoon gents. I was just watching an old episode of Juila and Jaques cook on PBS this morning. She had to be in her late 70's or possibly 80 when these were made. She still had a great sense of humour and she was still sharp as could be. They were doing an all vegetable show and were comparing how each cooked green beans and peas. I wish I would have watched her back when I was younger. She had such a good sense of humour.

Regards, Todd

ratcheer
08-29-2009, 11:12 AM
That is odd - she was not British!

Tim

Phog Allen
08-29-2009, 11:17 AM
Boy do I feel dumb. I just caught a bit of the show and she sure sounded like it to me. Maybe it was her travels in Europe that brought it out in her voice. I just did a bit of searching for her history. She sure had the dry sense of humour. Sorry for the erroneous comment and no disrespect meant to our English friends. I will edit the mistake.

Regard,s Todd

82R100
08-29-2009, 11:31 AM
Darn.

Now we don't know how you disrespected our English friends!:confused:

Phog Allen
08-29-2009, 11:40 AM
Naw, no big deal. I just thought she was British. I didn't watch her when I was younger and didn't know anything about her. I just caught a few minutes of an old show today and thought her voice sounded a bit British. She seemed to have a really dry, sly sense of humour which I have always admired in the Brits. Just mistaken identity of sorts.

Regards, Todd

professorchaos
08-29-2009, 01:07 PM
There are bad ways to learn how to cook. Watching Julia Child and thinking she is British is not one of them.

Shane
08-29-2009, 01:14 PM
Julia Child helped to bring television cooking to the forefront with her personality, but lest we forget, she made some really, really delicious food as well.

Seeing her work with anyone is a treat and watching some of her early footage is really quite humorous as well. I wish they made TV chefs like her today.

ratcheer
08-29-2009, 04:47 PM
Darn.

Now we don't know how you disrespected our English friends!:confused:

I read the original post and, I assure you, there was no disrespect at all.

Tim

SiBurning
08-29-2009, 06:23 PM
Julia and the galloping gourmet would have a hard time getting air time today. No sense wine-ing about it. :wink:

Seems like most of the new generation of serious tv chefs went to PBS. I really wish my cable company had more pbs. I especially miss Sarah Moulton. foodtv is almost useless for learning how to cook. (Okay, so maybe I'm being a little bit of a wine-o. I miss the Two Fat Ladies, too.)

Trying to sort through the dvds of Julia's tv series is a bit difficult. There's 2 sets with 18 episodes each, and the Americn Masters, then another set that might overlap those. I just ordered from pbs and they have a 25% discount, which they mostly take back with sales tax and shipping.

mretzloff
08-29-2009, 06:26 PM
Julia and the galloping gourmet would have a hard time getting air time today. No sense wine-ing about it. :wink:

Only because Rachel Ray, Emeril, and the rest of the Food Network loons have ruined educational cooking television. You could learn more in one Julia Child episode than in an entire season of Emeril.

Shane
08-29-2009, 06:42 PM
Only because Rachel Ray, Emeril, and the rest of the Food Network loons have ruined educational cooking television. You could learn more in one Julia Child episode than in an entire season of Emeril.
I tend to agree to a point. The Food Network has become a beast that cannot be stopped. There are some fantastic shows on the food network where fantastic food gets made and you learn about the process of cooking. However, shows like "Paula's Party", "Throwdown with Bobby Flay" and the ubiquitous "Food Network Challenge" are utterly unenjoyable to me. If I can't apply it to what I can do in my own kitchen, I usually avoid it.

One very notable exception is "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" with Guy Fieri. I would literally eat everything that has been featured on that show.

mretzloff
08-29-2009, 06:48 PM
I tend to agree to a point. The Food Network has become a beast that cannot be stopped. There are some fantastic shows on the food network where fantastic food gets made and you learn about the process of cooking. However, shows like "Paula's Party", "Throwdown with Bobby Flay" and the ubiquitous "Food Network Challenge" are utterly unenjoyable to me. If I can't apply it to what I can do in my own kitchen, I usually avoid it.

One very notable exception is "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" with Guy Fieri. I would literally eat everything that has been featured on that show.

What is even worse is that many of the so called "chefs" on Food Network have no culinary education. How can you be taken seriously when you have no education in the field you are trying to teach in? That would be like a homemaker trying to teach quantum physics at some college (no offense to homemakers).

Some shows are decent, but most are pointless. I do enjoy Bobby Flay's shows, though...

jwhite
08-29-2009, 10:38 PM
The cool thing about Julia is that she really cooked on her show, and occasionally mistakes were made. IMHO you can learn a great deal more from real circumstances in a working kitchen than the magic TV oven that spits out perfectly prepared meals.

Rughi
08-29-2009, 11:27 PM
One of my favorite moments of Jacques and Julia went something like this:

Jacque: If you want to make it lighter, you don't need so much of the cream...
Julia: And if you want to cut back on the cream, you can always use butter instead!

:eek:

Roger

pal
08-30-2009, 01:47 AM
Only because Rachel Ray, Emeril, and the rest of the Food Network loons have ruined educational cooking television. You could learn more in one Julia Child episode than in an entire season of Emeril.

And don't forget one of my favorites, Justin Wilson. "Ima gona tell ye what Ima gona did".

ratcheer
08-30-2009, 06:09 AM
And don't forget one of my favorites, Justin Wilson. "Ima gona tell ye what Ima gona did".

I grew up on watching Justin Wilson's cooking show. I learned a ton from him about cooking with flavors instead of to some strict recipe.

But, he is gone now, too. Except for reruns, which are becoming less and less frequent.

Tim

tsmba
08-30-2009, 07:24 AM
I thought it interesting to learn about Julia's past. I believe her in her husband met in France during the war (WWII) when they were both in the OSS, that later became the CIA.
I also got a kick out of Justin Wilson. Who could forget his use of wine, or his method for judging "doneness" of pasta. He'd fish out a strand of spaghetti and fling it on the wall...if it stuck, it was done. I bet his wife *loved* having him in her kitchen.

RazorDingo
08-31-2009, 08:44 AM
I tend to agree to a point. The Food Network has become a beast that cannot be stopped..

I have somewhat mixed feeling about Food Network.

On the one hand, I certainly am glad that we now have an entire network devoted to cooks and cooking.

The bad side? Some observations:

1) Ever notice how many commercials on this network are for packaged frozen food? Nothing against Bertoli frozen pasta , but - it ain't really the height of culinary achievement.

2) Does anyone ever contemplate eating any of the creations featured on Ace of Cakes? Its interesting to see the artistry involved, but wouldn't it be simpler for them to make these sculptures out of plastic and steel wire?

3) Rachel Ray has gone from being fresh and charming to shrill and annoying faster than anyone I can ever recall. She was interesting and believable on $40 a Day. The food she now cooks on Food Network is middlebrow crap, at best. I can only imagine what the pet food she is now hawking tastes like.

4) The Food Network web site has to be the most annoying, user unfriendly and downright bad of any cable network. Searching for recipes is frustrating beyond belief.

5) Iron Chef: Possibly the most pointless piece of television programming in history. Why does anyone watch this? For the recipes? For the thrill of competition?

Austin
08-31-2009, 08:50 AM
I thought it interesting to learn about Julia's past. I believe her in her husband met in France during the war (WWII) when they were both in the OSS, that later became the CIA.
I also got a kick out of Justin Wilson. Who could forget his use of wine, or his method for judging "doneness" of pasta. He'd fish out a strand of spaghetti and fling it on the wall...if it stuck, it was done. I bet his wife *loved* having him in her kitchen.

I think they met in China while working for the OSS.

gone down south
08-31-2009, 09:44 AM
The original dubbed-into-English Japanese version of Iron Chef was one of those shows that's so bad it became good. The American version is just kind of blah. It's a shame, because I love Alton Brown, and Good Eats is about the only show worth watching on the Food Network these days.

RazorDingo
08-31-2009, 10:25 AM
Back to Julia Child:

I think we owe Julia Child and Jacques Pepin a great debt for pioneering the cooking of French cuisine in the American home. With that said, I'm not really a huge fan of a lot of her recipes. And a recent article in Slate Magazine (http://www.slate.com/id/2226512) highlighted the problem:


Consider the boeuf bourguignon depicted so romantically in the movie.....The ingredients and instructions for its recipe span three pages, and that is before you hit the fine print: The beef stock, braised pearl onions, and sautéed mushrooms all require separate procedures. Step 1 involves making lardons and simmering them for 10 minutes in a precise amount of water; seven steps later, the fat is finally skimmed off the sauce, which is either boiled down to thicken or adjusted with liquid if it's too thick.

And this is considered an entry-level recipe.


I don't consider myself lazy or unadventuous in my cooking. But since I'm usually cooking for myself and (at most) two or three guests - I'm not that willing to literally spend hours preparing a meal.

Maybe this is a failing on my part. And maybe this contradicts my swipe at Rachael Ray earlier in this thread. But I'm generally much more amenable to look for recipes that can be prepared in less than an hour of actual "preparation" time.

Jwolf24601
08-31-2009, 10:59 AM
I really miss Julia's shows, as well as "The Two Fat Ladies" They were imensly entertaining.

mretzloff
08-31-2009, 02:26 PM
5) Iron Chef: Possibly the most pointless piece of television programming in history. Why does anyone watch this? For the recipes? For the thrill of competition?

Have you seen the Japanese one? It is a thousand times better.

professorchaos
08-31-2009, 02:35 PM
I really miss Julia's shows, as well as "The Two Fat Ladies" They were imensly entertaining.

The Two Fat Ladies were entertaining. Their food wasn't the healthiest, but I bet it was good.

Phog Allen
08-31-2009, 04:54 PM
Well, as for beouf bourguignonne, it is a time consuming dish, but well worth it. I used the Ina Garten version. Ina is a very neat lady and so smooth on the set.

A big +1 on Two Fat Ladies. I have their cookbook. It is fantastic. Especially the section on wild game. I believe it is Clarissa that survives of the two and she unabashedly supports the blood sports! Particularly upland game bird hunting. Those two were a real hoot together. I loved the way they rode to the sets on a motorbike with sidecar! I could care less if their food was healthy or not. It is the kind of stuff this mick Irish kid grew up on. We just called some of it by different names here in the States. A big plate of bubble and squeak is right good on a cold fall morning.

Regards, Todd

mretzloff
08-31-2009, 04:56 PM
Well, as for beouf bourguignonne, it is a time consuming dish, but well worth it. I used the Ina Garten version. Ina is a very neat lady and so smooth on the set.

:001_wub:

I love boeuf bourguignon. I use the one from Mark Bittman's book The Best Recipes in the World. I find it to be superior to the one from Julia Child.

RayH
08-31-2009, 06:41 PM
One very notable exception is "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" with Guy Fieri. I would literally eat everything that has been featured on that show.

I have eaten at one of the places that he featured on his show. The OVER EASY restaurant in Phoenix Az. Serves breakfasts. I had the country fried steak and it had the best cream gravy I've ever had.
Will be going to La Piazza pizza parlor in Glendale soon. Also featured on Triple D. There are a couple of other places in the valley he went to that I want to try out such as Chino Bandido's. A mexican, oriental fusion cuisine.

tsmba
09-01-2009, 06:45 AM
They used to have a show called "The Best of...." and I really miss it. Many places I saw them visit were places I had been (or went after hearing of them on the show). One thing I don't like is the way they fill hours with double-episodes. If they want an hour show....make it as such.

SiBurning
09-01-2009, 09:28 AM
Back to Julia Child:
a recent article in Slate Magazine (http://www.slate.com/id/2226512) highlighted the problem:


Consider the boeuf bourguignon depicted so romantically in the movie.....The ingredients and instructions for its recipe span three pages, and that is before you hit the fine print: The beef stock, braised pearl onions, and sautéed mushrooms all require separate procedures. Step 1 involves making lardons and simmering them for 10 minutes in a precise amount of water; seven steps later, the fat is finally skimmed off the sauce, which is either boiled down to thicken or adjusted with liquid if it's too thick.

And this is considered an entry-level recipe.

I don't consider myself lazy or unadventuous in my cooking. But since I'm usually cooking for myself and (at most) two or three guests - I'm not that willing to literally spend hours preparing a meal.
Most of what I cook takes hours or days. Five hour braises are my favorite. I often remove the meat and let them cool off overnight to skim the remaining fat, so that's a two day process. Make my own stocks, which is at least 6 hours of work. More like 15 hours for a glace. I enjoy it, and find it relaxing. Of course, it's not for every day cooking, but a teaspoon of glace or a pint of good stock helps a lot with those every day dishes.

I've been moving away from the traditional French stocks towards Italian style. About a year ago, after straining a chicken stock and tossing away the solids, it dawned on me that this poor creature spent its entire existence in this universe just to become one quart of tasty liquid. Italians are a lot more frugal about how they boil meats and prepare stocks. The stocks are quite acceptable, and I can still use the meat. Still experimenting with this, especially with reductions.


The Two Fat Ladies were entertaining. Their food wasn't the healthiest, but I bet it was good.
I have cooking with the two fat ladies and the CD collection. There are some amazing recipes in there. Unfortunately, it's kind of hard to get hare, quail, and grouse around here, but that's only one section of the book. The rest is reasonable.

A.N's slow shoulder of lamb is my favorite, and so easy to make. First time I made it it was so amazing, but the next morning I felt sick. When I looked at the other half in the fridge I knew why. There was 1/2" thick layer of lamb fat on the bottom of the casserole. I ate the other 1/2".

The Nid Hog
09-01-2009, 09:47 AM
:001_wub:

I love boeuf bourguignon. I use the one from Mark Bittman's book The Best Recipes in the World. I find it to be superior to the one from Julia Child.

I've been using the one in Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook. Not difficult at all with excellent results. It's time consuming (the whole process takes a while) but it isn't too labor intensive (you're not obsessively tending it).

SiBurning
09-01-2009, 09:55 AM
I've been using the one in Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook.

As much as I like Julia, her shows, and her books, her food isn't quite to my taste. It's really easy to learn from Julia--I think she's the best at teaching--but it's also important to find a book from someone whose taste you agree with.

Dennis
09-01-2009, 09:59 AM
I've been moving away from the traditional French stocks towards Italian style. About a year ago, after straining a chicken stock and tossing away the solids, it dawned on me that this poor creature spent its entire existence in this universe just to become one quart of tasty liquid. Italians are a lot more frugal about how they boil meats and prepare stocks. The stocks are quite acceptable, and I can still use the meat. Still experimenting with this, especially with reductions.

I can't imagine using a whole chicken to make stock. What I do is save all the parts from when I cut up chickens (like the neck, backbone) and put them in a freezer bag. When the bag gets filled up, stock is made. A bird never sacrificed itself just to make stock but instead the opposite - what would have been wasted instead went to something useful.