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TimmyBoston
07-28-2009, 11:09 PM
As one of the newbie cyclists here. I have lots of questions. So instead of having a thread for every one, I thought a large inclusive thread like one might be more beneficial.

I'd like to encourage anyone with any question relating to bikes or biking to ask it here. :smile:

General cycling discussion is also encouraged as well.

TimmyBoston
07-28-2009, 11:11 PM
I'll get the ball rolling.

I'm starting to ride far enough where my two water bottles won't cut it. There is only one spot on the trail I ride to fill up and it's very near the beginning. Any recommendations on ways to carry more water on a road bike besides to the two slots for water bottles?

GoldenMonkey
07-28-2009, 11:24 PM
I'll get the ball rolling.

I'm starting to ride far enough where my two water bottles won't cut it. There is only one spot on the trail I ride to fill up and it's very near the beginning. Any recommendations on ways to carry more water on a road bike besides to the two slots for water bottles?

Indeed...CamelBak (http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recreation/hydration-packs.aspx). Depending on how much you intend to carry, how much optional storage you want, and how much "profile" you're looking for, there's a model to suit you. For me, when I was out for a day spin, road or moutain, I've found that the Rogue (http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recreation/hydration-packs/rogue.aspx) is well suited, at 70 oz. For hikes and stuff though, and hen I'm going to carry a lot of other stuff, and water for two, the M.U.L.E. (http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recreation/hydration-packs/mule.aspx) is great...100 oz. of water and enough storage for a truckload of Gu and PowerBars. It sits a lot higher though, and will really cut into your streamlineyness...but it was great for hiking the Na'Pali Coast on Kauai.

TimmyBoston
07-28-2009, 11:36 PM
Indeed...CamelBak (http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recreation/hydration-packs.aspx). Depending on how much you intend to carry, how much optional storage you want, and how much "profile" you're looking for, there's a model to suit you. For me, when I was out for a day spin, road or moutain, I've found that the Rogue (http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recreation/hydration-packs/rogue.aspx) is well suited, at 70 oz. For hikes and stuff though, and hen I'm going to carry a lot of other stuff, and water for two, the M.U.L.E. (http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recreation/hydration-packs/mule.aspx) is great...100 oz. of water and enough storage for a truckload of Gu and PowerBars. It sits a lot higher though, and will really cut into your streamlineyness...but it was great for hiking the Na'Pali Coast on Kauai.

I can't belive I didn't think about a Camelbak! (Picture me slapping myself in the forehead)

If I get one, I wouldn't mind a pack that's still pretty small (relative to what it's carrying of course) but would have a bit of room for other gear, phone, wallet, windbreaker, etc.) Any recommendations on one that would work for that and hopefully not unsuitable for a road biker.

GoldenMonkey
07-28-2009, 11:44 PM
The Rogue is sweet...it'll carry enough water to get you through (most of) the day, is slim and rides lower on your back (which is nice, because it won't bonk your helmet), and has a good sized pouch (130 cubic cm) with a cinch buckle and smaller inside mesh pocket. I can fit a pump, crash pack (first aid), a spare tube, tire levers, bike tool, gloves, cash/keys/wallet, snacks, and a windbreaker in there. Crazy. It's super comfortable to wear too. The other one I linked is total and complete overkill for biking though...it's almost a weekender bag + water.

TimmyBoston
07-29-2009, 12:25 AM
The Rogue is sweet...it'll carry enough water to get you through (most of) the day, is slim and rides lower on your back (which is nice, because it won't bonk your helmet), and has a good sized pouch (130 cubic cm) with a cinch buckle and smaller inside mesh pocket. I can fit a pump, crash pack (first aid), a spare tube, tire levers, bike tool, gloves, cash/keys/wallet, snacks, and a windbreaker in there. Crazy. It's super comfortable to wear too. The other one I linked is total and complete overkill for biking though...it's almost a weekender bag + water.

That's good to hear, the more I look at the Rogue, the more I like it. Thanks for the tip.

SRock
07-29-2009, 02:53 AM
I can't belive I didn't think about a Camelbak! (Picture me slapping myself in the forehead)

If I get one, I wouldn't mind a pack that's still pretty small (relative to what it's carrying of course) but would have a bit of room for other gear, phone, wallet, windbreaker, etc.) Any recommendations on one that would work for that and hopefully not unsuitable for a road biker.

Thanks Tim, that image gave me the chuckle I needed after a long day at work.

tsmba
07-29-2009, 07:01 AM
I never carry more than one bottle. I do most of my riding on county roads, two lane blacktops with (hopefully) little traffic. I scope out the places along the way that have water and stop at them all. Country churches are my best bet. Usually, if you walk around them, you'll find an outdoor tap or hose. I end up using the bottle pretty much as a cup....I'll dump it, fill with fresh water, drink my fill, fill the bottle, and go!

moonshine44
07-29-2009, 07:22 AM
Another vote here for a Camelbak. I don't leave home without it if I'm road biking, and quite often the same thing occurs when I'm on my mountain bike. It's always a good idea to carry spare tubes, some food, first aid kit of some sort, that sort of thing...

RazorDingo
07-29-2009, 08:08 AM
I've got a Camelback, but I only use it in a few situations: if I'm going to be riding through an area I don't know, and where there seems like there will be few opportunities to refill a water bottle. Camelbacks are great for mountain biking, or riding through desert areas - but on the road I find even the best of them interfere with my riding posture.

Generally I budget at least one litre of water for every hour on the bike. More if the temperatures are very high (95 F or higher). All of my bikes are fitted with two bottle cages. I set my watch to beep every fifteen minutes to remind me to drink - and I try and finish a bottle each hour.

I like the Polar brand insulated bottles. I've found they keep water reasonably cool for at least an hour or so - more if you fill them with icecubes before leaving home.

I buy the powdered Gatorade. Not only is it much more economical, but it also means less plastic bottles going in my recycling. As an *added benefit* I also fill empty pill bottles with a few scoops of Gatorade powder, and take that with me on 2 hour+ rides. That way I can mix up additional fuel, using any fresh water I encounter enroute.

I'm pretty rigorous about keeping waterbottles, etc. spotlessly clean. Very hot water, antibacterial detergent, a good bottle brush, and a periodic soak with a mild bleach mix helps. I've got a waterfilter built into my refrigerator, so I always use filtered water. I'm also pretty picky about the water sources I'll use on the road. A public water fountain - Yes. The bathroom faucet at a gas station - probably not.

redbike
07-29-2009, 10:00 AM
I'll get the ball rolling.

I'm starting to ride far enough where my two water bottles won't cut it. There is only one spot on the trail I ride to fill up and it's very near the beginning. Any recommendations on ways to carry more water on a road bike besides to the two slots for water bottles?

If I'm going that far, I take $ to buy water & Gatorade. Otherwise look for people washing their cars or watering their lawns. Some commercial establishments will let you fill up, but it always helps to make a purchase too.

Good luck with your riding. It's a great way to stay fit & healthy. You DO wear a helmet, I hope.

jim

Mysterion
07-29-2009, 10:16 AM
...Otherwise look for people washing their cars or watering their lawns...
A good suggestion, but please *don't* drink from a garden hose; dark and filled with stagnant water, they can harbor some really nasty bacteria. Also, they're rarely made from food-safe plastic.

Second the recommendation of churches as water sources; I've also filled up at public schools, sometimes aided by weekend custodial staff.

Finally, if you don't want to go the Camelback route, many triathletes run water bottles attached behind the saddle, like this set up. (http://www.eriksbikeshop.com/ride/product.asp?pf_id=PR3C3435)

TinFish
07-29-2009, 11:47 AM
Again, if you don't want to go with a Camelback, if you have a rear carrier, there are lightweight rack trunks, large enough for a couple water bottles as well as other stuff.
And they're insulated, so your bevs will stay cold (or hot if you ride on cold days)

Brodirt
07-29-2009, 12:53 PM
Hydration...a dicey topic...lots of theories.

Timmy. If you're consuming more than 2 24 oz. bottles over the time/distance that you have mentioned that you are riding you are probably over-hydrating.

I know, I know...everyone drinks at different rates, and I would tell you that you should always, except in rare and extreme circumstances, drink to your hearts content, but I recall mentioning to you earlier about overdoing it on your gear and nutrition that you carry along with you and how that leads to many cyclists becoming alienated from the sport.

I think Camelbak makes some very innovative products, but I think their "hydrate or die" ad campaign, along with the billions of dollars in the bottled water and sports drink market have made people into drinking machines!

Before you invest in a Camelbak I suggest you spend more time getting to know your body and how it reacts to the new stresses you are putting on it. I ride with a weekend race group of between 80-150 guys who put in a minimum of 50 hard miles at 22-25mph and NONE carry more than two bottles (not to mention that a Camelbak would have them cast out of the tribe in a heartbeat).

If it turns out that you truly must consume in excess of 24oz an hour and have no road side options, than by all means invest in a Camelbak.

kongjie
07-29-2009, 01:00 PM
As an alternative to a Camelbak, there are waist belts that can carry a couple of bottles. I forget the brand I have (I purchased it for xcountry skiing and haven't looked at it for a few months) but it is very comfortable and holds the bottles close to your body, so you don't feel them flopping around.

GoldenMonkey
07-29-2009, 01:10 PM
Hydration...a dicey topic...lots of theories.

Timmy. If you're consuming more than 2 24 oz. bottles over the time/distance that you have mentioned that you are riding you are probably over-hydrating.

I know, I know...everyone drinks at different rates, and I would tell you that you should always, except in rare and extreme circumstances, drink to your hearts content, but I recall mentioning to you earlier about overdoing it on your gear and nutrition that you carry along with you and how that leads to many cyclists becoming alienated from the sport.

I think Camelbak makes some very innovative products, but I think their "hydrate or die" ad campaign, along with the billions of dollars in the bottled water and sports drink market have made people into drinking machines!

Before you invest in a Camelbak I suggest you spend more time getting to know your body and how it reacts to the new stresses you are putting on it. I ride with a weekend race group of between 80-150 guys who put in a minimum of 50 hard miles at 22-25mph and NONE carry more than two bottles (not to mention that a Camelbak would have them cast out of the tribe in a heartbeat).

If it turns out that you truly must consume in excess of 24oz an hour and have no road side options, than by all means invest in a Camelbak.

Excellent, and very sagely advice...

Stubblefield
07-29-2009, 04:55 PM
For dirt riding a 2L Camelbak is all you need. I would go on multi-hour rides and never drink more than 1.5L from mine.

gearguywb
07-29-2009, 07:34 PM
If you use a camelback on a road bike the fashion police will nail you!

I do a hard group ride/race on Tuesday nights and ride to the start from the house. Ends up being a little over 50 miles and usually (this time of year) over 90 degrees and high humidity. To make sure I have enough liquids I will put a spare bottle into my jersey pocket and swap it out with the first empty from the bike.

wilsonent
07-29-2009, 10:13 PM
For off road trails, a Camelback is the way for me. Don't have to worry about mud and horse manure getting on the bottles. Have room in my 10yo HAWG to carry minipump, toolkit, extra tube, chain tool, and snacks.

For road biking, I try to drink a 24oz bottle per hour of cycling, but usually I am just below that. In rural KY, I know where the churches and minimarts are where I can get extra water if I need it.

By the way, I like to bring mini Payday bars instead of energy bars. Not too dry and hard, and very small.

TimmyBoston
07-29-2009, 11:26 PM
For road biking, I try to drink a 24oz bottle per hour of cycling, but usually I am just below that. .

That's my rate as well. I'm fine with my bottles on 2 - 2 1/2 rides, but on 3 to 4 hour ones, I really need more. So I went ahead and ordered the Camelbak Rogue. I think it will work well for me and I'm also a skier and it will be darn useful on the slopes.

Thanks for the tips guys!

TimmyBoston
07-29-2009, 11:26 PM
Next Question, what about pumps? Should I have a small one that I take with me? If so, which one should I get? (My local bike shop has been useless in trying to get this question answered.)

RazorDingo
07-30-2009, 12:43 AM
I'll assume you already have a decent floor pump for meeping your bikes tires maintained at home.

The short answer is - yes, anytime you take your bike out you ought to carry with you a small pump, as well as a spare inner tube, or a flat-fixing kit. Bike tires have improved over the last twenty years or so, but most cyclists get a flat from time to time.

The longer answer is that, if you DO get a flat, you will find it virtually impossible to inflate the new, or repaired, tube to anything like the 90-100 psi most road bike tires run at. At least with a hand pump. Given the small barrel diameter (with an inside area of less than 0.75") simple physics will tell us that it is virtually impossible for most humans to exert enough force to generate that sort of pressure. The best I've been able to do was about 60 psi. Not great - but enough for me to get the ten miles or so home.

The other option is one of the CO2 cartridge pumps. If used correctly, these will inflate a tire to ~95 psi very quickly - much quicker than by hand. The bad news is, the cartridges are something of a one-shot deal. You'd better hope that you've fixed your flat, and that you don't have a slow leak, etc. I've also heard from a couple of sources that these pumps are somewhat prone to breaking, and that if you aren't careful when inserting the cartridge you can lose the gas, Oops.

As you can tell, I prefer the mini hand pump. Its not perfect, but if you get really unlucky, it will work just about every time.

Lastly, I encourage everyone interested in cycling any distance beyond their local neighborhood to practice tire changing at home, in their garage. Master it, in fact. Knowing how to quickly remove the rear wheel, mount and dismount the tire, and apply a vulcanized patch, etc., are not things you want to learn when you are thirty miles from home, in the rain, cold, tired, and angry, by the side of the road. (And you should be able to change most road bike tires without the use of tire levers...)

Kratos
07-30-2009, 05:12 AM
Good advice, RazorDingo. You never know what you may run into on the road. Speaking of, do any of you who ride in mountain trails carry pepper spray or anything? I know it's not a big priority, but I've seen too many "I was knocked off my bike and mauled by a puma" stories to not think about such things. Of course, I only speak of areas where they are known to live.

I'll second that helmet. I hope you have a good one, now that you've got hydration covered.

Brodirt
07-30-2009, 08:01 AM
You must have a pump. Stay away from CO2, they are for race circumstances only. Quality pumps are made by Topeak, Blackburn, Barbieri and Lezyne. I use a Topeak micro-pump and think its great. I used to use the Barbieri and like it too...I gave it to the wife though, that may mean either I love it or hate it.

I will go with a Lezyne when I need to replace it though.

Generally, I would stay away from frame pumps. They do allow for a quicker fill, but in my opinion the benefits of a frame pump, which is far more dangerous than one in your back pocket (or now, in your case, in your Camelbak),are outweighed by those dangers.

If a quick tire patch is your concern go with the Park glueless patch kits over the vulcanizing patches. They work very well (usually) and really do save time on the road side.

Mysterion
07-30-2009, 08:01 AM
As already noted, you absolutely must carry a pump,as well as a spare inner tube and a patch kit. I have suffered multiple flats on more than one occasion, and the patch kit has saved my skin. Although it's true that you'll have trouble bringing a road tire to full inflation with a mini-pump, you should be able to manage at least 75psi. Although not universally true, in general, the tinier the pump, the more aggravating it will be to use; you should be able to find one that's a decent compromise between efficiency and portability. I'd probably point you toward something from Blackburn (http://www.blackburndesign.com/road_pumps.html)--good reliability record, and many of their pumps have a handle that flips out from the body, making them much easier to use. If you don't mind the size, get their full-length frame pump. Blackburn also offers a lifetime guarantee, and is good about honoring claims. nb--Look for a road-specific pump. You need to fill a high-pressure, low volume tire; a mountain-oriented pump is designed for the exact opposite (low-pressure, high volume.)

You'll also need some kind of tire removing tool--many folks gravitate toward traditional tire irons; forget 'em, and get a Quick Stik (http://www.bikepro.com/products/tubes/tubes-levers.html). It's the repair-shop standard.

Finally, learn how to change a flat tire the right way. It'll make the difference between a frustrating 40-minute hassle, and a routine 6-minute repair. Many local bike shops offer short courses--another good reason to get friendly with your LBS.

Once you're a race-ready tire changer, remember--It's accepted etiquette to offer assistance to any cyclist you see having roadside trouble. Be prepared to offer your spare tube, if it's the appropriate size. Karma, baby.

Mysterion
07-30-2009, 08:05 AM
...Generally, I would stay away from frame pumps. They do allow for a quicker fill, but in my opinion a the benefits of a frame pump, which is far more dangerous than one in your back pocket...
A couple of velcro pump straps should secure a frame pump. I do recall a few exciting racing incidents from way back, involving the then de rigeur Silca frame pump. (I just dated myself. Badly.)

If you haven't already gotten there: Cyclists are a very opinionated lot...

dwestenk
07-30-2009, 08:09 AM
... And you should be able to change most road bike tires without the use of tire levers...

Any tips on how to do this? I've change many a road bike tire and nearly always needed levers. Do I just need stronger hands and forearms? :confused:

Brodirt
07-30-2009, 08:20 AM
Any tips on how to do this? I've change many a road bike tire and nearly always needed levers. Do I just need stronger hands and forearms? :confused:

strong thumbs are the trick. although some tire/wheel combos are easy and some are hard, it is hit or miss. in my experience Mavic (a French company) work best with Hutchinson or Michelin tires (both French companies as well). Campagnolo rims work best with Vittoria or Veloflex tires. I have never owned Shimano wheels so can't comment.

GoldenMonkey
07-30-2009, 08:47 AM
You must have a pump. Stay away from CO2, they are for race circumstances only. Quality pumps are made by Topeak, Blackburn, Barbieri and Lezyne. I use a Topeak micro-pump and think its great. I used to use the Barbieri and like it too...I gave it to the wife though, that may mean either I love it or hate it.

I will go with a Lezyne when I need to replace it though.

Generally, I would stay away from frame pumps. They do allow for a quicker fill, but in my opinion the benefits of a frame pump, which is far more dangerous than one in your back pocket (or now, in your case, in your Camelbak),are outweighed by those dangers.

If a quick tire patch is your concern go with the Park glueless patch kits over the vulcanizing patches. They work very well (usually) and really do save time on the road side.

Again, sage advice. A Topeak micro does the trick for me. It's small, pumps air on both strokes, and has a built-in (although not quite accurate) pressure gauge. I'd rather carry my pump than have a fram pump anyway...they weigh more, come off constantly on the trail, and ones that secure well weigh more and are one more item to steal for some jerk...

Another fairly expensive but insanely practical and useful item I've found for saving the headache of punctures is kevlar tire liners. I live in an area that is full of thorns in the summer, and I've literally had to sit and pick out 20-30 thorns after a short stint. The kevlar liners serve two purposes for me:

1) they are extremely light - I have a full suspension Klein Mantra Comp MTB, and it weighs a hair over 26 pounds. I shaved off grams here and there, taking it down from its original 33 pounds through various upgrades and such. I'm able to run ultra light tubes (the downside being I have to pump up the tires regularly before every ride, but that's no biggie, since I check pressure anyway) using the liners, instead of heavy duty ones, ones with puncture sealer stuff in them, or really beefy tires (of course my tires are light as hell too, lol). This seems like a small weight difference, but for both tires we're talking about 12 oz. saved from original spec, and over a pound from self sealing tubes.

2) All that aside, they work freakin' awesome. I have yet to get a puncture since I switched to them. Ok, now the down side...

They are expensive, at about $50 per pair. If you factor in the cost and time and weight savings of not having to regularly replace tubes and use up patch kits, and not have to carry levers and spare tubes, then it pays off. Another downside is they do stop tube punctures, but with things like thorns, they still leave the points in the tire itself...you'll have to regularly take tube and tire off, and feel around the inside, removing thorn corpses. If you don't, they work their way inside, and can rub between the liner and tire. if you run lower tire pressures. Lastly, although they extend a little ways up the sidewalls they dont really protect from punctures directly in the sides...but I've only ever had that happen once, so the risk is minimal.

redbike
07-30-2009, 09:05 AM
A couple of velcro pump straps should secure a frame pump. I do recall a few exciting racing incidents from way back, involving the then de rigeur Silca frame pump. (I just dated myself. Badly.)

If you haven't already gotten there: Cyclists are a very opinionated lot...

I still have one! Bright red with a Campy logo. I'll never let it go.

Brodirt
07-30-2009, 09:11 AM
I still have one! Bright red with a Campy logo. I'll never let it go.

Awesome....I want it. Mine is long gone. I had all chrome.

redbike
07-30-2009, 09:15 AM
strong thumbs are the trick. although some tire/wheel combos are easy and some are hard, it is hit or miss. in my experience Mavic (a French company) work best with Hutchinson or Michelin tires (both French companies as well). Campagnolo rims work best with Vittoria or Veloflex tires. I have never owned Shimano wheels so can't comment.

I run high pressure (140 psi) clinchers with a kevlar bead. I have never been able to remove or install one of these tires without tire irons. I have a set of plastic ones that work well; I keep them in my saddle bag along with a spare tube, patch kit and CO2 cartridge. I think they're the ones just below the Quik Stik linked to above.

The other thing that's been handy is a mylar Clif bar wrapper. I once had a puncture due to a metal shard that left a 1/8" hole in the tire. I lined the tire with the wrapper, installed replacment tube, etc. and rode 15 miles back to my car. A dollar bill can also be used for this purpose.

jim

dwestenk
07-30-2009, 09:19 AM
... some tire/wheel combos are easy and some are hard, it is hit or miss. ...


I run high pressure (140 psi) clinchers with a kevlar bead. I have never been able to remove or install one of these tires without tire irons. I have a set of plastic ones that work well; I keep them in my saddle bag ...

Thanks. These comments mirror my experience as well.

RazorDingo
07-30-2009, 09:19 AM
There is kind of a ju-jitsu to leverless tire changing. I'll see if I can upload a video of me doing a tire. Its sorta difficult to describe exactly the process.

But in general, if you are using a lot of force - you ain't doing it right. (There are exceptions to this. I've got a set of studded winter tires for my commuting bike that require levers no matter what.)

koso
07-30-2009, 09:23 AM
I use a Topeak Road Morph frame pump. Can do Schrader or Presta valves. Love it.

I mainly wanted to post in this thread to mention the importance of a helmet.

I went for a ride Sunday night, blew off the helmet, and of course crashed when my front tire blew. Landed on my head on the street. Head still hurts, though the nausea has faded. The one time in a hundred I said, I won't crash, it's hot, screw the helmet, bang.

kongjie
07-30-2009, 09:31 AM
Speaking of, do any of you who ride in mountain trails carry pepper spray or anything? I know it's not a big priority, but I've seen too many "I was knocked off my bike and mauled by a puma" stories to not think about such things.

I don't think I've heard of anyone on a bike being attacked by a puma and defending themselves with pepper spray. Unless it were attached to your wrist like Spidey's web shooters, I don't know how you would have the presence of mind and time to get it and use it while being attacked, especially considering many attacks involve your head in the puma's jaws.

The best defense is probably to ride with a buddy and to stay close enough that your buddy can quickly come to your assistance, or vice versa. Luckily, attacks are very rare considering the number of animals and the huge number of humans coming into their habitat.

Mysterion
07-30-2009, 09:37 AM
Awesome....I want it. Mine is long gone. I had all chrome.
If you really want one that badly, a buddy of mine owns a shop in Italy. He could probably track one down...

At the risk of being branded totally RG, I still rely on my ancient Silca track pump--it's not as efficient as a modern floor pump, but it's an old friend, and it refuses to die.

TinFish
07-30-2009, 10:02 AM
I use a Topeak Road Morph frame pump. Can do Schrader or Presta valves. Love it.

I mainly wanted to post in this thread to mention the importance of a helmet.

I went for a ride Sunday night, blew off the helmet, and of course crashed when my front tire blew. Landed on my head on the street. Head still hurts, though the nausea has faded. The one time in a hundred I said, I won't crash, it's hot, screw the helmet, bang.

Chip,
+1 on the importance of a helmet.
I may be over reacting, but if your head still aches and you have nausea for four days after your crash, you might want to get yourself checked out by a doc (if you haven't already done so) There's no such thing as "too careful" when it comes to head injuries and we'd like to have you around for awhile!

Pete

Brodirt
07-30-2009, 11:31 AM
I run high pressure (140 psi) clinchers with a kevlar bead. I have never been able to remove or install one of these tires without tire irons. I have a set of plastic ones that work well; I keep them in my saddle bag along with a spare tube, patch kit and CO2 cartridge. I think they're the ones just below the Quik Stik linked to above.

140!? What are you riding? The highest clincher I have seen or used is a Veloflex Record, and that is an ultra-light racing tire at 130psi. Are they Tufos, which are run at 160psi?


The other thing that's been handy is a mylar Clif bar wrapper. I once had a puncture due to a metal shard that left a 1/8" hole in the tire. I lined the tire with the wrapper, installed replacment tube, etc. and rode 15 miles back to my car. A dollar bill can also be used for this purpose.

jim

The mythical boot! Lots of things work great...the dollar bill is by far the best. For really bad ones you can use the plastic case from your Park glueless patch kit, it is thin and soft enough not to cut the reinstalled tube. The best boot I have ever heard of is the mountain bike method when you totally trash a tube and have no replacement you just stuff your tire full of leaves!


If you really want one that badly, a buddy of mine owns a shop in Italy. He could probably track one down...

At the risk of being branded totally RG, I still rely on my ancient Silca track pump--it's not as efficient as a modern floor pump, but it's an old friend, and it refuses to die.

I have my Silca track pump but dont use it. I use a Topeak Joe Blow and it is SPECTACULAR. If you get one you will not regret it. It is the best bicycle pump I have ever used, and I would say behind the Park Third Hand, the best bicycle tool I have ever used.

If you happen to hear of an available Campy pump I would be interested. Don't go to the effort for me though.

RazorDingo
07-30-2009, 12:16 PM
I don't think I've heard of anyone on a bike being attacked by a puma and defending themselves with pepper spray.

I don't think I've ever heard of a bicyclist being attacked by a puma period. Most wildlife is far too shy to be much of a threat. Althugh one real bonus of "ice biking" (riding in the middle of a midwestern winter) is coming across a herd of deer in the moonlight. The bike moves so silently that, if you are riding upwind, they have no idea you are coming until you are right among them. Rolling by a small herd, the group standing motionless in the darkness, so close you could reach out and touch them, is a truly magical experience. (Lyrical recollection over..)

One real threat most cyclists face is from aggressive dogs, which generally aren't shy at all. I've heard all sorts of strategies, from hitting them on the muzzle with a pump, to keeping a squirt bottle of ammonia. But the best strategy is to slow, and dismount if necessary, using the frame of your bike as a shield if they attack. If an aggressive loose dog makes regular appearances on your bike route - snap some digital pictures and file a complaint with the local law enforcement office. The legal penalties become quite astronomical if a dog attacks after the owner has been warned.

Mysterion
07-30-2009, 12:55 PM
I use a Topeak Joe Blow and it is SPECTACULAR. If you get one you will not regret it...
Agreed that the JB is functionally superior, and durable to boot; we always used one for the shop pump. There's nothing rational about using a Silca in this day and age, but we've been through a lot together. When the present leather seal wears out, I may be tempted to update, but it will be with a touch of sadness.

gearguywb
07-30-2009, 01:13 PM
I had a bad flat this weekend on a group ride. Tore across the tire for about 1/2" and through the tube. Used the dollar bill to patch the inside of the tire, new tube installed and away we go. Made it home ok, but there was a pretty good know by the time I made it back.

I am a fan of CO2 cartridges. I always carry two of the non threaded and the nozzle to use them. If you use the non threaded you can purchase them at Wal Mart or some other ibg box store. They are sold in packs of 25 or 50 for use in CO2 guns. Usually end up being about 10% of the threaded cartridge price.

redbike
07-30-2009, 01:14 PM
140!? What are you riding? The highest clincher I have seen or used is a Veloflex Record, and that is an ultra-light racing tire at 130psi. Are they Tufos, which are run at 160psi?

They're Vredestein Fortezza's. Rated to 145 psi. They're a bit bouncy on the rough roads in Maine, but I love how they roll. And I haven't had a flat yet. Check 'em out.

Wendy
07-30-2009, 03:15 PM
I would get lectured for the amount of water I drink so on to the next thing. Any suggestions for shoes? I am not interested in spending an entire car payments worth on shoes but a decent middle of the road shoe would be nice. I want to avoid buying at the bike shop I would prefer Ebay and need suggestions.

kongjie
07-30-2009, 03:48 PM
I don't think I've ever heard of a bicyclist being attacked by a puma period. Most wildlife is far too shy to be much of a threat.

Agreed. However we did have one cyclist attacked by a puma in California a few years ago. Her friend came up on the attack and used her bike as a weapon, I believe.

And after the attack they found another biker partially eaten by the puma. However, it's unclear if he was attacked and eaten or died from other causes (e.g., heart attack) and then was scavenged by the puma.

TinFish
07-30-2009, 03:54 PM
Wendy,
Have you considered one of the online catalogues like Performance or Nashbar?
Probably more selection of shoes of all types, styles, and price points from entry level on up. Sometimes they have blowout sales on really good stuff and their own name brand stuff is made by reputable mfgrs.

Brodirt
07-30-2009, 04:00 PM
I would get lectured for the amount of water I drink so on to the next thing. Any suggestions for shoes? I am not interested in spending an entire car payments worth on shoes but a decent middle of the road shoe would be nice. I want to avoid buying at the bike shop I would prefer Ebay and need suggestions.

My wife has been riding a pair of Adidas Vuletana women's shoes for years and thinks they are pretty good. I have a pair of Adidas shoes that I use exclusively for cyclocross racing, and this is due to my wife's experience and the fact that they are cheap shoes. You can probably find them at either Nashbar or Performance (as mentioned above) or on Ebay...be forewarned, they tend to run a bit long so you might have to do some returning.

Billski
07-30-2009, 04:58 PM
My bicycle is nine months old. I rode it about every day at about six miles per day. The bike shop said the chain was bad. I complained . So the shop owner put on a new one for free. This is a KHS mountain bike. This is a lousy testimony, isn't it?

gearguywb
07-30-2009, 06:33 PM
My bicycle is nine months old. I rode it about every day at about six miles per day. The bike shop said the chain was bad. I complained . So the shop owner put on a new one for free. This is a KHS mountain bike. This is a lousy testimony, isn't it?

Not really. 9 months X 30=270 X 6 miles per=1620 miles. That is not too bad. A big part of how long a chain will last is what kind of care you give it. Lubed regularly, cleaned regularly, exposed to rain/water/sand/dirt/grit, will all cut down the life expectancy.

Wendy
07-30-2009, 07:04 PM
Wendy,
Have you considered one of the online catalogues like Performance or Nashbar?
Probably more selection of shoes of all types, styles, and price points from entry level on up. Sometimes they have blowout sales on really good stuff and their own name brand stuff is made by reputable mfgrs.

I will give that a shot. The pro shops near me are just far to expensive.

Wendy
07-30-2009, 07:10 PM
My wife has been riding a pair of Adidas Vuletana women's shoes for years and thinks they are pretty good. I have a pair of Adidas shoes that I use exclusively for cyclocross racing, and this is due to my wife's experience and the fact that they are cheap shoes. You can probably find them at either Nashbar or Performance (as mentioned above) or on Ebay...be forewarned, they tend to run a bit long so you might have to do some returning.

My brother actually just told me the the pro shop had Adidas on clearance and I blew him off I did not ever realize they were into cycling shoes. Go figure. I may have to make a run tomorrow. I am a little bitter about riding tomorrow the police are supposed to start a "ticket operation" ticketing anyone over 15mph, I am just hoping they are talking about during the day when all the kids and ignorant adults are on the trails not paying attention to oncoming traffic. We are done with our ride by 7:30 so I am keeping my fingers crossed.

TimmyBoston
07-30-2009, 10:39 PM
Onto shoes and pedals.

I'm with Wendy, I want to find something as cheaply as I can and my LBS is just too damn high (for some of the employees that is literal :biggrin:).

I would prefer to have mountain bike shoes so I can walk a little easier if I should need to and I have heard they are a touch cheaper at the entry level. I've checked out my LBS and the cheapest thing that had to offer was almost $200 that's just much more than I have spend. So I'm looking online but have NO idea what to look for. Also when it comes to pedals, how do I know they will fit my shoes? I'm so lost on this topic, it's embarrassing.

Kratos
07-31-2009, 01:49 AM
Scared?Shoooot, I have seen at least 3 stories of bikers being attacked by pumas, and 2 got killed. tell them the pumas were scared(I know most are, man, I'm just foolin' about). One guy managed to get out his knife and cut the big cat's throat, which got it off of him and saved his life. I think the beast lost its life that day. As mentioned, presence of mind takes precedence, but if you don't have any equalizers it's going to be even worse for you. Pepper spray works on most dogs, and it's small.

TinFish
07-31-2009, 09:33 AM
Tim,
There is nothing to be embarassed about-there's a lot of stuff out there and it's hard to keep up with it-especially if you're new.
Price wise, your LBS just can't compete with the catalogue warehouses-they usually don't have the space or $ to order such huge inventory and thus get the bulk discounts, so they usually carry a smaller stock of higher-end stuff, depending on how they see their market. Where the LBS blows away the big guys, is in the personal service they can provide. LBS owners and employees (at least here) are themselves avid cyclists and have personal experience with what they sell. They want your business and will be happy to educate you as well as they can. But then, the catalogue businesses also have full time technical assistance (techno-weenies) who you can speak to or chat with on line. Now, to over-simplify.....when you buy a set of pedals, they usually come with the shoe hardware you need to make your shoes snap in properly. When you buy shoes, they are usually clearly marked as to what pedal styles they are compatible with.
If you buy shoes and pedals from one of the mail/online order places, be tactful about asking your LBS to help you get them set up properly. Understandably, they have no love for those big guys and the business they lose to them.
I hope this helps-It's been a looong time since I've actually done any of this myself.

redbike
07-31-2009, 01:02 PM
Tim,
There is nothing to be embarassed about-there's a lot of stuff out there and it's hard to keep up with it-especially if you're new.
Price wise, your LBS just can't compete with the catalogue warehouses-they usually don't have the space or $ to order such huge inventory and thus get the bulk discounts, so they usually carry a smaller stock of higher-end stuff, depending on how they see their market. Where the LBS blows away the big guys, is in the personal service they can provide. LBS owners and employees (at least here) are themselves avid cyclists and have personal experience with what they sell. They want your business and will be happy to educate you as well as they can. But then, the catalogue businesses also have full time technical assistance (techno-weenies) who you can speak to or chat with on line. Now, to over-simplify.....when you buy a set of pedals, they usually come with the shoe hardware you need to make your shoes snap in properly. When you buy shoes, they are usually clearly marked as to what pedal styles they are compatible with.
If you buy shoes and pedals from one of the mail/online order places, be tactful about asking your LBS to help you get them set up properly. Understandably, they have no love for those big guys and the business they lose to them.
I hope this helps-It's been a looong time since I've actually done any of this myself.

Well said. On-line retailers don't fix your bike. It's well worth having a good relationship with an LBS that has helpful and knowledgeable staff.

gearguywb
07-31-2009, 03:35 PM
I have been riding for several years pretty seriously and do more than a bit of shopping on the internet but I still go out of my way to spend some $ at the LBS. There are some things that only they can do and it never hurts to develop some repore with them.

koso
07-31-2009, 04:21 PM
I had an old-timer tell me that by the time you see the cat, it's too late.

Not sure how he knew that, though...

TinFish
07-31-2009, 08:03 PM
Because he's old?
Hope you're feeling better.

TimmyBoston
07-31-2009, 09:37 PM
On my ride this afternoon a 62 year old man was assaulted about a mile from where I was at the exact time. It wasn't really in a bad area and it was in broad daylight at around 3pm. Does anyone every consider carrying any self defense weapons with them while riding? I've never even thought about it, but after today....

http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=10827965&nav=menu188_2

moonshine44
07-31-2009, 09:38 PM
Onto shoes and pedals.

As weird as it might sound, I wear sandals for most of my road biking. But here's the kicker: they're Lake cycling sandals set up for SPD cleats. The cool thing about sandals is that if it's cold, you can put on more socks, and they still fit, because you can just let the straps out...

Lake, Shimano, and now Keene all make cycling sandals. I know a lot of hard-core roadies who wear sandals. Just make sure you either wear socks (I use thin Smartwools) or a lot of really good sun screen on your feet...

I have Shimano SPD mountain bike cleats on both my road bike and my mountain bike...

Kratos
08-01-2009, 06:07 AM
I had an old-timer tell me that by the time you see the cat, it's too late.

Not sure how he knew that, though...

It all depends. Better to see it and at least brace yourself, than be totally ambushed. It is a rare occurrence, though. The last verified report I read about was back in '07. It's just something I was wondering about. A bigger danger would be dogs, and humans, if you were in urban areas.

Sandals for riding, eh? That's interesting. It must help keep cool, but I'm not sure I'd go for it. Big +1 on that sunscreen. That would suck to have sunburned feet.

Wendy
08-01-2009, 10:35 AM
On my ride this afternoon a 62 year old man was assaulted about a mile from where I was at the exact time. It wasn't really in a bad area and it was in broad daylight at around 3pm. Does anyone every consider carrying any self defense weapons with them while riding? I've never even thought about it, but after today....

http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=10827965&nav=menu188_2

I may consider it now. I ride on popular trail and lake area and usually feel safe but there is a lot of wooded areas that I would not be comfortable in alone for any period of time. I am fortunate to ride with my brother at least 4 days of the week. Safety in numbers.

TimmyBoston
08-01-2009, 12:49 PM
I may consider it now. I ride on popular trail and lake area and usually feel safe but there is a lot of wooded areas that I would not be comfortable in alone for any period of time. I am fortunate to ride with my brother at least 4 days of the week. Safety in numbers.

I personally think you should look into some pepper spray. Fox Labs makes some good stuff, that's what my girlfriend carries.

SRock
08-01-2009, 05:00 PM
On my ride this afternoon a 62 year old man was assaulted about a mile from where I was at the exact time. It wasn't really in a bad area and it was in broad daylight at around 3pm. Does anyone every consider carrying any self defense weapons with them while riding? I've never even thought about it, but after today....

http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=10827965&nav=menu188_2

Were you riding on the Monon? My guess is that you were heading deeper into Indy?

EDIT: I posted before reading the article. Clearly the Monon runs into some less than hospitable parts of town. I'd say if you aren't comfortable with a side arm at the very least take some potent pepper spray and a cell phone with you EVERY time you go.

Wendy
08-01-2009, 07:13 PM
I personally think you should look into some pepper spray. Fox Labs makes some good stuff, that's what my girlfriend carries.

I second that. Maybe it was from reading this thread or the spook movie I watched last night but at 3pm today I went on a solo ride and was nervous. It was raining when I left the house the first time so I waited until it let up. The roads were still wet and the sky was dark for the first 10 miles. It was 5 miles until I ran into another person. When I got to thinking I was on a trail that had corn fields on one side and trees lining the other with the highway about 100ft from that. Anything could happen. The "safe" part of my ride circles a lake which had police ticking earlier today so I avoided that and only came across 3 people. With that in mind I do need something for protection.

Brodirt
08-01-2009, 07:15 PM
Ladies and Gents...while I can't offer any help for Pumas I am strongly opposed to arming one's self against man's best friend. First, it hurts the dog, who is likely just defending his territory; second, your'e more likely to hurt yourself as you scramble in a panic to grab a pepper spray can out of your jersey pocket at 15-25mph to spray at a moving target while you, too, are moving...seriously, who are we all kidding?; third, and most important, the best defense against a dog is a stern commanding "stay" or "sit"...it works EVERY TIME.

Wendy
08-01-2009, 07:40 PM
Ladies and Gents...while I can't offer any help for Pumas I am strongly opposed to arming one's self against man's best friend. First, it hurts the dog, who is likely just defending his territory; second, your'e more likely to hurt yourself as you scramble in a panic to grab a pepper spray can out of your jersey pocket at 15-25mph to spray at a moving target while you, too, are moving...seriously, who are we all kidding?; third, and most important, the best defense against a dog is a stern commanding "stay" or "sit"...it works EVERY TIME.

I myself am not afraid of an animal attack but a human attack. My very popular trail that is usually very safe sometimes feels uncomfortable, not to mention one of my best friends had and aunt murdered on this very trail.

Kratos
08-01-2009, 09:57 PM
Ladies and Gents...while I can't offer any help for Pumas I am strongly opposed to arming one's self against man's best friend. First, it hurts the dog, who is likely just defending his territory; second, your'e more likely to hurt yourself as you scramble in a panic to grab a pepper spray can out of your jersey pocket at 15-25mph to spray at a moving target while you, too, are moving...seriously, who are we all kidding?; third, and most important, the best defense against a dog is a stern commanding "stay" or "sit"...it works EVERY TIME.

Yeah, right. Tell that to any of my co-workers who have had to shoot dogs charging them. In some cases the OWNERS were yelling at them to stop.

By far I believe the greatest danger comes from other people, especially if you ride in urban areas where they are driving, seconded by loose dogs.

SRock
08-01-2009, 10:21 PM
Ladies and Gents...while I can't offer any help for Pumas I am strongly opposed to arming one's self against man's best friend. First, it hurts the dog, who is likely just defending his territory; second, your'e more likely to hurt yourself as you scramble in a panic to grab a pepper spray can out of your jersey pocket at 15-25mph to spray at a moving target while you, too, are moving...seriously, who are we all kidding?; third, and most important, the best defense against a dog is a stern commanding "stay" or "sit"...it works EVERY TIME.

No offense brother and I am not trying to be offensive or start an argument with you but this may be one of the most misleading things I've ever read here on the B&B. And to make things worse you said it works EVERY TIME.


Yeah, right. Tell that to any of my co-workers who have had to shoot dogs charging them. In some cases the OWNERS were yelling at them to stop.

By far I believe the greatest danger comes from other people, especially if you ride in urban areas where they are driving, seconded by loose dogs.

+1 I agree that man is your greatest risk when walking, jogging, cycling etc.

Back to the primary subject:

I had a friend that was dispatched to housing on a report that 2-3 large dogs were "terrorizing" children. When he responded to the area he didn't/couldn't find them. He got out and started walking down the access road/alley between houses looking for them. He rounded a corner and three Rottweilers (I love Rotties BTW) tore out after him. They chased him about a block back to his patrol car. He made it safely to his cruiser and called for a pair of K-9 officers and asked them to bring nooses to try and catch the dogs. While he was waiting the dogs took off. He drove around for a while and never found them. He headed back to the LE desk. After a short 2.5 mile drive he arrived. He got out of the car, locked the door and as soon as he turned around two of the dogs were rushing him, apparently they followed him all the way back to the desk. He ran around his cruiser and another several times with the dogs rapidly closing distance. Eventually he turned and shot the first dog in the head. The gun shot scared the other dog off. Know what he did during his first encounter with them in housing? He yelled, "Heel, Sit, Stay" and all commands fell on the deaf ears of angry dogs. Know what he did when the chase started around the cars? He turned and yelled, "Sit, Stay!". It doesn't work EVERY TIME. That is just irresponsible to claim. It is good advice and in fact I agree it will work quite often. In fact many times you don't need to say anything, you can simply yell loudly and that will stop many dogs.

TimmyBoston
08-02-2009, 01:08 AM
Were you riding on the Monon? My guess is that you were heading deeper into Indy?


You're right it does go through some sketchy places, but where this happened was right at 54th, right by Mama Carolla's somewhere that I've never thought of as a bad area. Nasty stuff.

SRock
08-02-2009, 02:46 AM
You're right it does go through some sketchy places, but where this happened was right at 54th, right by Mama Carolla's somewhere that I've never thought of as a bad area. Nasty stuff.

That's just sad at least they caught the SOB's!

gearguywb
08-02-2009, 03:09 AM
It seems that Dog/Cyclist problems vary by area. Having lived in far too many locals, N.Ga/Chattanooga TN was the worst. Great riding but a lot of untethered dogs. It eventually got to the point that many of us carried a can of "Halt" spray. I used it twice on dogs with great effect. Both times were on dogs that were on a fairly regular route that I took. After being sprayed I was never cahsed by either of those dogs again.

I always try and remember that it is not the dogs fault. Somewhere there is ann owner that allowed a dog to develop that kind of behavior. One of the dogs that I sprayed the owner was standing in the yard. He never called the dog or reacted when it took off after me, but once the owner saw that I peppered the dog, he yelled at me to leave the dog alone!

SRock
08-02-2009, 03:24 AM
It seems that Dog/Cyclist problems vary by area. Having lived in far too many locals, N.Ga/Chattanooga TN was the worst. Great riding but a lot of untethered dogs. It eventually got to the point that many of us carried a can of "Halt" spray. I used it twice on dogs with great effect. Both times were on dogs that were on a fairly regular route that I took. After being sprayed I was never cahsed by either of those dogs again.

I always try and remember that it is not the dogs fault. Somewhere there is ann owner that allowed a dog to develop that kind of behavior. One of the dogs that I sprayed the owner was standing in the yard. He never called the dog or reacted when it took off after me, but once the owner saw that I peppered the dog, he yelled at me to leave the dog alone!

+1 and that guy is an example of irresponsible owners for sure.

I got chased by an American Bull Dog or Bull Terrier once while jogging, as it closed the distance I turned around to yell at it, hoping that would quell the issue. When it didn't and the dog lunged I punched it square on top of the head and KO'd it. I also jacked up my hand something fierce. I thought for sure I was going to get mauled. A few days later while running the same route a guy came out to confront me asking if I'm the one who did it. I told him yes and he started going on and on about getting a lawyer and suing. I asked it the dog was ok, pointed out the local leash law and went about my run. People like that are the problem, not the animal. Still, that doesn't change the fact that would should be prepared.

Brodirt
08-02-2009, 07:17 AM
Yeah, right. Tell that to any of my co-workers who have had to shoot dogs charging them. In some cases the OWNERS were yelling at them to stop.

By far I believe the greatest danger comes from other people, especially if you ride in urban areas where they are driving, seconded by loose dogs.

Yea, but those are dogs meant to do exactly that...that's an apples to oranges comparison. Im talking about your local home owner's dog that is out in his yard, not some pit bull bent on ripping your arm off! If you're only option is riding in areas where you have to worry about those kinds of attacks that I might suggest you try a new fitness regime.

Kratos
08-02-2009, 02:55 PM
Yea, but those are dogs meant to do exactly that...that's an apples to oranges comparison. Im talking about your local home owner's dog that is out in his yard, not some pit bull bent on ripping your arm off! If you're only option is riding in areas where you have to worry about those kinds of attacks that I might suggest you try a new fitness regime.

They weren't all pits. Those dogs get a bad rap. I'm not saying it doesn't work. But animals are unpredictable. People who have had dogs for years get bitten by them sometimes, regardless of breed. But that's a good point, about finding another path if yours is overrun by loose canines.

Back on topic, I looked into getting into cycling a while back, but doing it properly was more than I wanted to spend at the time. I may look to it in the future. I loved riding as a kid, and I rode a cheap mountain bike to work when I first moved out. That reminds me, headlights. I had 2 on my bike. They have much better ones than those cheap Bell incandescents I had. Here, night riders are required to have a light visible for at least 1,000 ft. I don't know if Tim plans to ride at night, though. I did it because I had to.

koso
08-02-2009, 07:01 PM
These LED lamps are unbelievable. So much brighter than the old ones, and with a fraction of the power consumption.

Wendy
08-02-2009, 07:06 PM
I bought shoes today now I have to buy the pedals. Is there a normal price range? I do now want to spend money in the same store I bought the shoes. I went to Momentum cycles today and purchased shoes but those guys sure think they are hot you know what. They have 3 stores locally and 2 of the 3 should be out of business because they are so ignorant to their customers. I am so disappointed at customer service these days.

TinFish
08-02-2009, 08:33 PM
Wendy,
I'm sorry to hear that your local bike shop isn't taking the time that they should with you, well knowing the mail order/online bike warehouses are killing them. I'm a staunch advocate of developing raport and doing business with the LBS, but they have to make an effort too. As much as I hate to say this, speak to or chat on line with the techno-weenies at Performance, Nashbar or one of the many other online/mail order businesses. They usually know what they're talking about, and in my experience, they won't talk down to you if you're a noobie or anything less than a TDF rider. As for the pedal price ranges, I don't know exactly what you're looking for, but I think you can get something decent for less than or around $100.
Ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

SRock
08-03-2009, 01:37 AM
They weren't all pits. Those dogs get a bad rap.

Too true. I never blame the breed I blame the owners.

I agree with BroDirt as well if your route is over run with rabid dogs go a different route!

redbike
08-03-2009, 02:59 AM
I bought shoes today now I have to buy the pedals. Is there a normal price range? I do now want to spend money in the same store I bought the shoes. I went to Momentum cycles today and purchased shoes but those guys sure think they are hot you know what. They have 3 stores locally and 2 of the 3 should be out of business because they are so ignorant to their customers. I am so disappointed at customer service these days.

Wendy,

Both of the big on-line stores, Nashbar and Performance Bike, have their own line of pedals, which are less expensive than a brand name, and certainly less than $100.

Good luck.

jim

moonshine44
08-03-2009, 07:44 AM
I bought shoes today now I have to buy the pedals. Is there a normal price range? I do now want to spend money in the same store I bought the shoes. I went to Momentum cycles today and purchased shoes but those guys sure think they are hot you know what. They have 3 stores locally and 2 of the 3 should be out of business because they are so ignorant to their customers. I am so disappointed at customer service these days.

Hi Wendy. I've got these pedals on two bikes, and like them very much:

Shimano PD-M520 (http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033535_-1_44000_20000_44503)

Wendy
08-03-2009, 09:30 AM
Hi Wendy. I've got these pedals on two bikes, and like them very much:

Shimano PD-M520 (http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033535_-1_44000_20000_44503)

Wow. You can not beat the price. Thanks for the info.

Wendy
08-03-2009, 09:34 AM
Wendy,
I'm sorry to hear that your local bike shop isn't taking the time that they should with you, well knowing the mail order/online bike warehouses are killing them. .

I would pay a little more to go in a store and purchase from a person rather than a mag or internet but if they are that rude they do not deserve my hard earned money. They will lose a lot more business running a business that way.

TimmyBoston
08-03-2009, 12:56 PM
Wendy,

Both of the big on-line stores, Nashbar and Performance Bike, have their own line of pedals, which are less expensive than a brand name, and certainly less than $100.

Good luck.

jim

How are those pedals? Are they any good or are they junk?

TinFish
08-03-2009, 01:12 PM
I believe that most Nashbar named stuff as well as the Performance brand (Forte) are made for them by reputable, bigger name mfgrs...I sure can't remember whom. I've never used their pedals but have been quite pleased with their other things.

Brodirt
08-03-2009, 04:11 PM
How are those pedals? Are they any good or are they junk?


I believe that most Nashbar named stuff as well as the Performance brand (Forte) are made for them by reputable, bigger name mfgrs...I sure can't remember whom. I've never used their pedals but have been quite pleased with their other things.

Its all made in Asia in a few factories. Its only when you get the big dollar producers, and then only with their top line products, that the production becomes exclusive. Companies like Look and Speedplay, in the pedal market, produce some expensive pro-tour pedals and those are made in house. They make some lower market lines as well and those are made in big factories.

While I have never used Nashbar and/or Performance's in house products I would think that with a product like a pedal you should not worry about it...a frame, fork, wheel, stem, seatpost or handlebar and I would advise against it.

gearguywb
08-03-2009, 05:27 PM
For the $ they tend to be pretty darn good.

redbike
08-03-2009, 05:29 PM
How are those pedals? Are they any good or are they junk?

I would say they're certainly not junk, though I also have to say that I've never used Nashbar or Performance pedals. My recommendation is based on my good experience with some of their other branded products, including tires, bar tape, tools, etc. I'm pretty sure that their stuff generally falls in the middle in ratings by bike mags.

Both stores also have pretty good live help via chat or phone.

Let us know what you do.

jim

Mysterion
08-03-2009, 05:38 PM
I believe that most Nashbar named stuff as well as the Performance brand (Forte) are made for them by reputable, bigger name mfgrs...I sure can't remember whom...
Wellgo makes the great majority of generic and name-brand spd-type pedals. Among the generic entries, the most important distinction is bearing quality, which varies surprisingly from model to model. That said, I'd agree that a set of Nashbar/Perf/Whatever pedals would be just fine for most recreational riders.

If you can find a local shop that agrees with you, you might ask if they have some "take off" pedals; for a variety of reasons, many new-bike sales entail a pedal change, and good deals frequently are available on essentially new merchandise, though without any packaging. (This is a good reason to get friendly with the mechanics in your LBS.)

Wendy
08-03-2009, 08:31 PM
Hi Wendy. I've got these pedals on two bikes, and like them very much:

Shimano PD-M520 (http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033535_-1_44000_20000_44503)

I am so lost on the whole shoe/pedal thing. I talked to a woman at Nashbar tonight and she asked me a few questions about my shoes finally I said I do not know they are a gift because I felt so stupid :confused:
Long story short I still do not know what kind of shoes I have I know they fit good and I think I got a hell of a deal. I found the same shoes online for $100 more than I paid. I have mountain bike shoes but I do not ride a mountain bike nor do I ride a road bike, does that mean they have hybrid shoes?? I think I will just order these pedals and hand them to my brother and ask him to do a quick swap and call it a day.

moonshine44
08-03-2009, 10:33 PM
Hi Wendy. If you have mountain bike shoes, those pedals are just what you need. The pedals should come with the cleats to clip to the pedals. The cleats will bolt to the bottoms of the shoes, and help attach your feet to the pedals. It doesn't matter what kind of bike you ride. The main thing with mountain shoes is that the cleats are slightly recessed, making it easier to walk when you're off the bike.

A word of advice regarding those pedals and the cleats: take your bike in the house, put it in a doorway so you have something to hang onto, get on the bike with your cleated shoes on, hold yourself up, and practice clipping and unclipping your shoes from the pedals. It'll save some skinned body parts later.

gearguywb
08-04-2009, 03:27 AM
The above is good advice. Go ahead and accept the fact that you are going to fall over at the most inconvenient time because A. You forgot to unclip, or B. You unclipped but leaned to the wrong side.

Clipless pedals are the greatest thing ever but it will take a bit of getting used to. The difference in road and mountain shoes is that road shoes the cleats will be the lowest part of the shoe. With mountain shoes the cleats will be recessed into the sole. Mountain shoes are easier to walk in, road shoes have a stiffer sole (generally).

RazorDingo
08-04-2009, 04:01 AM
This is probably an over-broad generalization, but clipless pedals are the difference between someone who is serious about cycling, and someone who isn't.

Actually, "clipless" pedals are somewhat of a misnomer - since you definitely "clip" in and out with them. But that is another story.

I think a lot of pain and frustration would be avoided if bike shops would provide a stationery exercise bike (like you find at a gym) with "clipless" pedals on it. That way, people who were new to the experience could try out the experience of clipping in and out of pedals in an environment where it is pretty much impossible to fall over. I've never seen this in a bike store - maybe it exists somewhere.

I've known a lot of people get frustrated with clipless pedals. People who haven't fallen off a bike since they were six get very bruised egos (to say nothing of elbows and buttocks) when they topple over. I know at least one woman who gave up on cycling completely (with a nice, brand new, $1200 Specialized road bike in her garage) because she fell over once.

The other thing about clipless pedals, that I think confuses a lot of newcomers, is the fact that you need to add cleats to the bottom of your cycling shoes. And that there are several different sorts of cleat/pedal combinations - and they are not at all compatible with one another. Confusing and alarming to many people.

Wendy
08-04-2009, 08:13 AM
A word of advice regarding those pedals and the cleats: take your bike in the house, put it in a doorway so you have something to hang onto, get on the bike with your cleated shoes on, hold yourself up, and practice clipping and unclipping your shoes from the pedals. It'll save some skinned body parts later.

Hey Chuck thanks for the advice. I am in no hurry to remove skin from my body. In addition to that I have shoulder surgery coming up and with my lack of luck I will be the one to fall right before or after surgery.
On a side note I am excited to put the shoes/pedals to use. I always leave my husband in the dust even on weekends when I am tugging a kid or two behind me. Having the ability to get my feet damp in the ground and my feet not slipping off pedals afterwards will add a little more speed and for him that is going to hurt. :biggrin: In all fairness he rides a mountain bike and I am on a fitness bike so it is much faster but I will take the credit.

moonshine44
08-04-2009, 10:18 AM
Hey Chuck thanks for the advice.

You are most welcome, ma'am. I'm speaking from experience there...

TimmyBoston
08-04-2009, 12:38 PM
What do you guys think of these products?

These pedals?

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_133493_-1___

or

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_197367_-1___

or

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_175046_-1___
And either one of these shoes?

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_223462_-1___

or

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_170186_-1___

and finally

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_168999_-1___

Thanks!

Brodirt
08-04-2009, 12:44 PM
I received a 20% off one item coupon and some others in a Nashbar catalog that came in the mail today. Whoever is ordering let me know and I will shoot you out the code #.

TimmyBoston
08-04-2009, 12:45 PM
I received a 20% off one item coupon and some others in a Nashbar catalog that came in the mail today. Whoever is ordering let me know and I will shoot you out the code #.

Thanks so much!

Tell me which of those I should order and I'll get it placed today. :biggrin:

Brodirt
08-04-2009, 01:26 PM
Thanks so much!

Tell me which of those I should order and I'll get it placed today. :biggrin:

time shoe and shimano pedal.

I'm flipping through the catalog....Pearl Izumi quest road shoe looks great at 49.99 as does Adidas Vueltano at 64.99 and I love the Pearl Izumi attack at $69.99, I wear PI shoes and think they are very good for the money. For mtb shoe the time MXE Carbon Fibre at 69.99 looks great.

Pedals....I am seeing that you prefer the shimano type system, so the Nashbar tourmalet at $44.99 looks good, but I would say the Look style Nashbar Izoard at $59.99 would be better, but that is a whole different system.

There is also a Lezyne mini tool w/chain cracker at 14.99 and Lezyne mini pump for $19.99.

Coupons....20% off one item is sc3264, 20% off shoes is sc6264, buy any 5 items and get 15% off total bill is sc4264. Free shipping on $75 or more is sc1264. Use them cleverly and you could get a lot of money off.

TimmyBoston
08-04-2009, 01:46 PM
Brodirt, you're the man! :thumbup::punk:

I say this all the time, but I can't express how much I love this site, you can get the bets information on the widest variety of subjects of anthing I've ever seen. :001_smile

TimmyBoston
08-04-2009, 01:47 PM
Pedals....I am seeing that you prefer the shimano type system, so the Nashbar tourmalet at $44.99 looks good, but I would say the Look style Nashbar Izoard at $59.99 would be better, but that is a whole different system.
.

I don't know anything about systems, I really kinda picked those at random. :redface:

Brodirt
08-04-2009, 02:02 PM
I don't know anything about systems, I really kinda picked those at random. :redface:

Shimano system is different from Look system is different from Crank Bros. system. I like Look best, but many like Shimano SPD style best...SPD style provides for the best off bike walkability.

Brodirt
08-04-2009, 02:05 PM
Brodirt, you're the man! :thumbup::punk:

I say this all the time, but I can't express how much I love this site, you can get the bets information on the widest variety of subjects of anthing I've ever seen. :001_smile

HOOOOOOLD EVERYTHING....those coupons have dates on them. Sorry there....sc3264 and 4264 are 8/10 through 8/16. sc5264 and sc6264 are 8/17-8/23.

perry
08-04-2009, 03:58 PM
I've been thinking about

http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10052&catalogId=10551&productId=1033535

and

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1072036_-1_46500_20000_46503

If ordering from Nashbar, use a virtual credit card number or something if you can. They've had troubles this year w/ a bunch of cards being stolen. Probably better safe than sorry...

Oh, question on computers. Will they work in trainers? Do most of wires long enough to get to the rear tire? Should I go wireless? I use my phone to do GPS tracking outside now, but I'd like a way to track distance in the winter.

moonshine44
08-04-2009, 08:14 PM
I have a Sigma that is rear-wheel compatible. I think the cheap Bell computer that I have no my mountain bike has enough wire to reach as well...

TimmyBoston
08-04-2009, 11:37 PM
I'd like to revisit the bike safely topic we talked about earlier. And by safety I don't mean helmets, I mean safety from any potential bad guys.

The two main self defense items that have crossed my mind are pepper spray and a neck knife.

I think pepper spray would be better than the neck knife as the range is quit a bit better and it's ease of use. But where to store it? I've found a bike mount for pepper spray here (http://www.defensedevices.com/bike-mount-bicyle-pepper-spray.html), but and I were to attack someone on a bike, the way I'd do it is by clothslining them or hitting them with an object and trying to knock them off the bike, either way if you were attacked in this manner, you would be removed from the pepper spray and it might even be used against you.

Also with bike clothes, it doesn't exactly lend itself to carrying pepper spray either. So I'm at a loss. A jersey pocket is a possibility but it might fall out of go off accidentally.

The neck knife would easy to access (heaven forbid) but by the time you knew you'd need it, you'd most likely be on the ground and it would difficult to fight with.

So I'm at loss, any ideas?

Edit: Something I wanted to add off topic, I did find this on a site that was pretty cool, especially for those who run or whose wife or girlfriend is a jogger. This product. (http://www.defensedevices.com/jogger-strap.html)

Kratos
08-05-2009, 03:15 AM
A neck knife isn't a bad idea, and may not be as hard to access as you think. But as we talked about in the Home Defense Weapons thread, I think it was, without training a knife isn't the best defense weapon. It can, however, provide a well-deserved surprise to someone who is on top of you raining blows down. They can also be worn on the ankle. Ka-Bar makes some nice little knives, as does Cold Steel.

They have belt clips for pepper spray, so depending on what you bike in that could be an option. They also have keychain options, which could be worn around your neck.

Wendy
08-05-2009, 06:23 AM
Hi Wendy. I've got these pedals on two bikes, and like them very much:

Shimano PD-M520 (http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033535_-1_44000_20000_44503)

They are on the way to me. Now I have to be patient and wait for the post office to do their job. I think my pedals I have on bike are about to go. :mad:

Wendy
08-05-2009, 06:28 AM
A word of advice regarding those pedals and the cleats: take your bike in the house, put it in a doorway so you have something to hang onto, get on the bike with your cleated shoes on, hold yourself up, and practice clipping and unclipping your shoes from the pedals. It'll save some skinned body parts later.

Today my brother and I thought we would ride our bikes to the trail. This was a first. I am a little nervous in traffic to say the least. I did have your above message pop in my head a few times when we had to come to a sudden stop I would have looked a little silly stuck to my bike between the cars :w00t: I will be practicing quite a bit when the pedals arrive.

Brodirt
08-05-2009, 06:31 AM
On safety....speed is your best weapon.

I would suggest that it is nothing but stupid to carry a knife while on a bicycle regardless of how well it may be secured. I disagree with pepper spray but at least with that if you have an ordinary mishap you aren't putting yourself or others at risk.

I would suggest that if you are fearful of attack while riding, that again, you ride elsewhere. Either get in your car and go elsewhere or ride in a different direction. Seriously, I have spent many, many years riding in New York City. I have ridden through some pretty rough neighborhoods and have never been fearful of anything other than being doored.

I would suspect that the statistics regarding cyclists being attacked are immeasurable and that a fear of such is irrational.

Kratos
08-05-2009, 06:51 AM
On safety....speed is your best weapon.

I would suggest that it is nothing but stupid to carry a knife while on a bicycle regardless of how well it may be secured. I disagree with pepper spray but at least with that if you have an ordinary mishap you aren't putting yourself or others at risk.

I would suggest that if you are fearful of attack while riding, that again, you ride elsewhere. Either get in your car and go elsewhere or ride in a different direction. Seriously, I have spent many, many years riding in New York City. I have ridden through some pretty rough neighborhoods and have never been fearful of anything other than being doored.

I would suspect that the statistics regarding cyclists being attacked are immeasurable and that a fear of such is irrational.

Bike cops carry knives AND guns on them. I guess they're really stupid. These things happen more than you think. I've had people jack with me while I was riding to work. One guy buzzed me with his car, and others just tried to get me off the bike, to which I used the aforementioned speed to my advantage(and luck). Most crime doesn't hit the papers. People in my town act all surprised that we have drive-bys, but it happens all the time. there's nothing wrong with being prepared for bad things. Sometimes the one who needs help may not even be you.

Brodirt
08-05-2009, 08:08 AM
Bike cops carry knives AND guns on them. I guess they're really stupid. These things happen more than you think. I've had people jack with me while I was riding to work. One guy buzzed me with his car, and others just tried to get me off the bike, to which I used the aforementioned speed to my advantage(and luck). Most crime doesn't hit the papers. People in my town act all surprised that we have drive-bys, but it happens all the time. there's nothing wrong with being prepared for bad things. Sometimes the one who needs help may not even be you.


Yes, and they are trained for that and they are usually pedaling along at 7-8 mph, not the 15+mph that a recreational cyclist does.

As for being buzzed by cars, that happens all the time...those people are tools, but I'm sorry I would rather not wave my knife at the 4000lb speeding vehicle. Anything to not incite someone that has already proven needs no further inciting is the way to go...cyclists NEVER win those confrontations!

As for being prepared...I keep coming back to this theme. Water, a pump, a patch kit, a multi-tool, a power bar or gel, $20, a credit card and a cell phone and you are prepared for your bike ride to almost anywhere. I have mentioned the concept of alienation from the sport and it boils down to that "being prepared" idea. The beauty of cycling is freedom. The more you take with you and the more concerned you are with "being prepared" the less free you are. Too many people carry too much stuff that they don't need and will never use. As you add trappings to what is an incredibly efficient and simple activity, the activity becomes more of an endeavor than an escape. Less really is more...try it and you might agree with me.

gearguywb
08-05-2009, 08:32 AM
Unless you really know what you are doing a knife is a BAD idea. You need to be in breath range to do anything. A much better solution, if you really think you need something, is some form of mace/pepper spray. Remember, you are trying to get away from an attacker, not prolong a confrontation.

Live2Ride
08-05-2009, 09:16 AM
I would describe myself as a mountain biker who likes to ride long distances (my avatar is me with a big 'ol grin on my hardtail - complete with slicks and aerobar - toward the end of the Siskiyou Century).

Here are some gems that have helped me tremendously:

- The bike has to fit. If it doesn't, you won't ride it.

- If something goes numb, get off the bike! I failed to heed this one at the 12 Hours of Weaverville a few years ago and my big toe was numb for a year. It's surprisingly annoying to have a numb toe, so don't mess around with, ahem, more important parts.

- Shirt, shoes, shorts (but I forget the order). As your riding progresses, you'll see the need for pedaling in perfect circles/increased efficiency - shoes/pedals. When you notice your cotton tee shirt weighs six pounds and your buddy with the jersey looks ready to ride another 20 miles - shirt/jersey. Bonus: the more colorful, the more likely the soccer mom's will see you before running over you. As your mileage increases, you'll make the jump to spandex - in my case, grudgingly and only before my first metric century.

- When on the road, even if only riding to a trail, I always have a rear view mirror. It's amazing how people respond when you turn and look at them as they're on a path to run you down - so far, they all move way over.

- A little courtesy doesn't hurt and may even help. When people move way over to pass, I give them a wave of thanks (and with the whole hand, not just one finger).

- Always assume you are invisible to motorists - see rear view mirror above.

As for shoes/pedals: I have SPD's on my mountain bikes. Until last week I had Look pedals on my road bike, but a bearing is going out so I replaced them with SPD pedals. Mountain bike shoes are very comfortable and you can walk in them. Road shoes look like they were designed by a sadist - ridiculous to walk in. Comfort in your price range is the key. Most of my shoes have been purchased from my local bike shop. Sure, cost a bit more than Performance Bike, but you can try them on and make certain they fit.

As for defense on the bike: the rear view mirror is all I have currently, but have considered the following: camcorder - rear facing, mounted on the bike or helmet; concealed weapon - but that adds even more weight, and really, where do you conceal it?; Sharpie - to write down license plate numbers on my arm or thigh. I have heard of a guy in Oregon who rides with a shoulder holster - but check your local laws on that one.

The most important thing is to enjoy the ride, come home safe, and live to ride another day.

Kratos
08-05-2009, 12:21 PM
As for being prepared...I keep coming back to this theme. Water, a pump, a patch kit, a multi-tool, a power bar or gel, $20, a credit card and a cell phone and you are prepared for your bike ride to almost anywhere. I have mentioned the concept of alienation from the sport and it boils down to that "being prepared" idea. The beauty of cycling is freedom. The more you take with you and the more concerned you are with "being prepared" the less free you are. Too many people carry too much stuff that they don't need and will never use. As you add trappings to what is an incredibly efficient and simple activity, the activity becomes more of an endeavor than an escape. Less really is more...try it and you might agree with me.

I was being a bit facetious. My point was it is not that hard to safely carry a blade on you. I am seldom without one, have been for the past 12 years or so. You make a good point. There's a fine line between having what you need and having too much. I carry my ID, cell, and keys when I run outside. A bottle of water if I'm going longer than a mile or so. And I have one of my knives on me. I'm just more geared toward being ready when your equipment fails, and I'm used to carrying lots of gear. That said, the only thing I'd add to your list is a few ounces of blade.

tm3
08-05-2009, 01:25 PM
pumps: i like a frame pump. what i like even better on my road bike is specialized armadillo tires. zero, yes, zero, flats in several years. heavier than some but i won't worry about that until i have minimized my body fat and maximized my conditioning, i.e. never.

shoes: this year i went non-clipless with rivendell grip kings. i find them much more comfortable than clipless pedals and specialized shoes. i like being able to ride in my running shoes. slower? maybe, but again my weight and conditioning spiel.

defense: anyone in a motor vehicle is already much better armed than a cyclist could ever be. a local biker here was irritated at a passing pickup truck and gave some choice language and the one finger salute. the good ole boys in the truck stopped, beat the crap out of him, and he spent several days in the hospital. i think that caution, awareness, and avoidance are keys.

TimmyBoston
08-05-2009, 06:05 PM
I'm getting ready to place an order with Nashbar. Unfortunately since I can't try on any shoes and am worried about size.

I am looking at Pearl Izumi shoes. I wear a size 11, I am looking at the 45s and the 46s. Does anyone else wear Pearl Izumi's? If so, what American shoe size do you wear and what size cycling shoe do you wear?

Thanks!!!

redbike
08-06-2009, 09:20 AM
I'm getting ready to place an order with Nashbar. Unfortunately since I can't try on any shoes and am worried about size.

I am looking at Pearl Izumi shoes. I wear a size 11, I am looking at the 45s and the 46s. Does anyone else wear Pearl Izumi's? If so, what American shoe size do you wear and what size cycling shoe do you wear?

Thanks!!!

Nashbar has on-line support which can answer that question. I think their site also has a chart to give the European equivalent of US shoe sizes. You can also go to a LBS, try on some shoes, and then buy something else - like gloves or socks - to give them some business.

Mysterion
08-06-2009, 10:41 AM
Current Pearl models run pretty true-to-size. You'll probably need a 45, but shoe sizing is all over the place. I usually wear an 11 street shoe; my bike shoes run from 44-46.

Remember that your feet may swell a bit on long rides in warm weather.

TimmyBoston
08-06-2009, 02:13 PM
Current Pearl models run pretty true-to-size. You'll probably need a 45, but shoe sizing is all over the place. I usually wear an 11 street shoe; my bike shoes run from 44-46.

Remember that your feet may swell a bit on long rides in warm weather.

Thanks for the advice, I ordered a pair of 46s, I went larger because I have wide feet. If they are too big I shall return them.

TimmyBoston
08-07-2009, 10:50 PM
My dad got into cycling the same time I did. He's almost 70 and he needs a lot of cushion. I can't get him to wear the cycling bibs that I wear. He's too old school. Like I've stated earlier the selection at my local bike shop is very, very small and virtually non-existent for mountain bike shorts. So I'm looking for some baggier shorts with the thickest chamois I can get.

Thanks!

gearguywb
08-08-2009, 03:41 AM
Actually a thick chamois may not be a good answer. You are best served by a chamois that fits you well, padded in the right area relative to your saddle and how you sit on the bike. Some shorts with a lot of pad you end up feeling a bit disconnected from the bike. Imagine riding with a large diaper on...you get the idea.

perry
08-08-2009, 10:28 AM
My dad got into cycling the same time I did. He's almost 70 and he needs a lot of cushion. I can't get him to wear the cycling bibs that I wear. He's too old school. Like I've stated earlier the selection at my local bike shop is very, very small and virtually non-existent for mountain bike shorts. So I'm looking for some baggier shorts with the thickest chamois I can get.

Thanks!

Check out BGI if he wants to see em in person. I got Louis Garneau mountain biking shorts there when I bought my bike in July. The chamois feels a little thicker than the bibs that I bought from love2pedal.com. They're pretty comfy. They have a 30% off coupon on their website good thru tomorrow http://bgindy.com/ Would make the shorts pretty reasonably priced.

I think it's these - http://www.louisgarneau.com/catalogs/catalog_product.asp?catalogue=SM9&section=MC&sub_section=004&style_no=1054065&type_catalogue=&language=ENG&website=2

So, who shaves their legs? DE or straight? Or cartridge? I'm starting to understand how not having hair on my legs would help w/ wound healing.

gearguywb
08-08-2009, 08:11 PM
The first time you get to pick all the little asphalt grains out of your legs you will be really glad you shave!

I have always used a Mach3 with good results. Tried a DE for the first time the other day...not good. I am going to try again, slow down and pay attention. We'll see how it goes.

Brodirt
08-09-2009, 07:02 AM
The first time you get to pick all the little asphalt grains out of your legs you will be really glad you shave!

I have always used a Mach3 with good results. Tried a DE for the first time the other day...not good. I am going to try again, slow down and pay attention. We'll see how it goes.

This summer I have kept trimmed as I have been racing a fair amount. Double edge doesn't work well for me at all. I use a disposable version of a Mach3.

perry
08-09-2009, 03:04 PM
Yesterday I wore my bibs w/o shorts over them for the first time. Awesome. Today I was back to my baggy shorts. Not quite as awesome. Need to find money for more bibs! It has been expensive getting myself started!

gearguywb
08-09-2009, 04:50 PM
Good bibs sure make suffering more enjoyable.

Geez that sounds bad.

GeorgeIV
08-10-2009, 04:59 AM
As strange as the lycra shorts look, they serve a very distinct purpose. I made the switch from baggies to bibs on my road bike after less than a season of riding. Thankfully, I was working in the industry full time then, so I had plenty of "gentle" guidance when it came to my equipment.

TimmyBoston
08-10-2009, 10:06 PM
I've been looking to do some light touring, some day trips, maybe an overnighter or two.

My bike is a Trek 1.5 Compact. Is there a rack I could hook up to the bike to attach a bag to? Also what packs do you recommend?

GeorgeIV
08-11-2009, 06:00 AM
Your Trek 1.5 has all of the required mounts for any rack. If you purchased your bike from an LBS, they probably carry the Bontrager BackRack (http://store.trekbikes.com/jump.jsp?itemID=2132&itemType=PRODUCT&path=1,2,15,411,412&iProductID=2132&bShopOnline=1). They were redesigned for the 2010 model year, and I am a big fan of the new supports. The model you choose (BackRack I or BackRack II) will depend upon the size of your frame.

Bontrager is Trek's component manufacturing company name, by the way. Different names, same company.

For all weather bike touring, the Orliebs (http://www.rei.com/product/604989?preferredSku=6049890020&cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-datafeed-_-product-_-6049890020&mr:trackingCode=A198DB8E-0419-DE11-B4E3-0019B9C043EB&mr:referralID=NA) are about as nice as they come. If you want something more affordable, Topeak (http://www.treefortbikes.com/395_333222342180__Pannier-Drybag-Pair.html) makes some nice, waterproof panniers for a bit less than the Orliebs.

Wendy
08-11-2009, 06:53 AM
A word of advice regarding those pedals and the cleats: take your bike in the house, put it in a doorway so you have something to hang onto, get on the bike with your cleated shoes on, hold yourself up, and practice clipping and unclipping your shoes from the pedals. It'll save some skinned body parts later.

I received pedals yesterday and decided not to put on until a day I would not be riding with morning traffic. I thought your advice made perfect sense. Darn good thing because today I was turning off the main road into my subdivision and somehow I clipped my brothers rear tire and was on the ground in an instant. I went down hard and fast. I rode home thinking it was not bad but I have a feeling I will be feeling it here in a little while. My calves touch when I walk they are bruised and swollen so bad. :frown:

moonshine44
08-11-2009, 07:32 AM
I received pedals yesterday and decided not to put on until a day I would not be riding with morning traffic. I thought your advice made perfect sense. Darn good thing because today I was turning off the main road into my subdivision and somehow I clipped my brothers rear tire and was on the ground in an instant. I went down hard and fast. I rode home thinking it was not bad but I have a feeling I will be feeling it here in a little while. My calves touch when I walk they are bruised and swollen so bad. :frown:

OUCH! I came close to doing that once riding with a buddy of mine up in Victoria, BC. I yanked my foot loose and got it down just before I crashed, fortunately.

Get well soon!

Wendy
08-11-2009, 08:04 AM
Maybe someone here can help me understand what happens to a person when they put the riding gear on? Or is it being on a road bike? I swear 90% of the men riding every morning are GOD. I sometimes question my faith but every morning I am reminded there are several "GODS". :mad3:

When my brother and I ride we see the same people for the most part every morning. The people on road bikes are just plain rude. Is it because they have a more expensive bike they cannot even give you a quick nod or a hello back? I have never came across another person on a mountain bike that was rude, (yet). Maybe we do not fit in with our hybrids : ) We are not in their way and we are not riding too slow for them????? Oh well, I guess my brother is right he and I just look terribly mean. :w00t:

I must say I get a kick out of the guys who have several thousand invested in their bike and are obviously above me, (you know the kind who can not even say hello in the parking lot) then you see them put their bike in the backseat of their big piece of crap car parked next to you. Thanks for the vent session.

redbike
08-11-2009, 09:43 AM
Maybe someone here can help me understand what happens to a person when they put the riding gear on? Or is it being on a road bike? I swear 90% of the men riding every morning are GOD. I sometimes question my faith but every morning I am reminded there are several "GODS". :mad3:

When my brother and I ride we see the same people for the most part every morning. The people on road bikes are just plain rude. Is it because they have a more expensive bike they cannot even give you a quick nod or a hello back? I have never came across another person on a mountain bike that was rude, (yet). Maybe we do not fit in with our hybrids : ) We are not in their way and we are not riding too slow for them????? Oh well, I guess my brother is right he and I just look terribly mean. :w00t:

I must say I get a kick out of the guys who have several thousand invested in their bike and are obviously above me, (you know the kind who can not even say hello in the parking lot) then you see them put their bike in the backseat of their big piece of crap car parked next to you. Thanks for the vent session.

This phenomenon is commented on frequently on bike web sites. Some road riders with expensive bikes and (usually) team kits ride in a world of their own. It can't hurt to wave or nod, but don't expect a response.

Brodirt
08-11-2009, 10:27 AM
I received pedals yesterday and decided not to put on until a day I would not be riding with morning traffic. I thought your advice made perfect sense. Darn good thing because today I was turning off the main road into my subdivision and somehow I clipped my brothers rear tire and was on the ground in an instant. I went down hard and fast. I rode home thinking it was not bad but I have a feeling I will be feeling it here in a little while. My calves touch when I walk they are bruised and swollen so bad. :frown:


There are two kinds of cyclist...those that have crashed and those that are going to crash. I hope you feel better, but it comes with the territory.


Maybe someone here can help me understand what happens to a person when they put the riding gear on? Or is it being on a road bike? I swear 90% of the men riding every morning are GOD. I sometimes question my faith but every morning I am reminded there are several "GODS". :mad3:

When my brother and I ride we see the same people for the most part every morning. The people on road bikes are just plain rude. Is it because they have a more expensive bike they cannot even give you a quick nod or a hello back? I have never came across another person on a mountain bike that was rude, (yet). Maybe we do not fit in with our hybrids : ) We are not in their way and we are not riding too slow for them????? Oh well, I guess my brother is right he and I just look terribly mean. :w00t:

I must say I get a kick out of the guys who have several thousand invested in their bike and are obviously above me, (you know the kind who can not even say hello in the parking lot) then you see them put their bike in the backseat of their big piece of crap car parked next to you. Thanks for the vent session.

Its called "race-facing" and its stupid, but not exclusive to us roadies. Unless someone is in the midst of a hard interval there is no reason for it.

Wendy
08-11-2009, 01:19 PM
This phenomenon is commented on frequently on bike web sites. Some road riders with expensive bikes and (usually) team kits ride in a world of their own. It can't hurt to wave or nod, but don't expect a response.

I always do. I think it irritates them even more. :smile:

DM.Aelis
08-11-2009, 01:43 PM
I always do. I think it irritates them even more. :smile:

Truth be told, I don't think this kind of behavior is exclusive to roadies. It's human nature :smile: for better or for worse. Usually the roadies you see are going faster than you, lets say, and you're just one of many people they might pass on a given route. If they're overtaking you they might not even think to say anything for fear of bothering you. If they're oncoming, they might just have their minds zoned in on their bike, their training, or an argument with their wife that day and are not paying attention to the waving cyclist on the other side of the road.

I wouldn't see it for any more than it is. And don't worry, I'm a racer and I'll always wave to you when I'm not too deep in the pain cave to manage it!

TimmyBoston
08-11-2009, 01:57 PM
I always do. I think it irritates them even more. :smile:

Wendy, just do what I do, bring water balloons. :devil:

airplanedoc
08-11-2009, 02:17 PM
In my experience you can plan on falling at laest once in the beginning of the season when you switch to clipless pedals.

Spend some time clipping in and out of the pedal to get the hang of it. Then go for a short ride somewhere that you are undistracted/alone. and get the hang of it before you go oout on the bike trail or road. I have a highschool nearby and rode there for a few minutes one evening to get the hang of clipping in and out of my pedals. I think it saved me quite a bit of skin when i went out on the trail.

AD

Brodirt
08-11-2009, 05:11 PM
Just a follow up on the whole "race facing" issue...I didn't have time for my full thoughts when I posted above.

Amongst those of us who care enough to acknowledge other riders, there is a bit of a hierarchy that is discussed.

First, there is less need to acknowledge someone you pass than someone across the road from you because, even though the proximity is closer, there is no eye contact happening. If you are being passed you have no obligation to do anything but respond to a greeting.

Second, there is no need to wave. Any form of acknowledgment is good enough, I rarely wave, in fact, but give almost everyone a nod or a quick "hook 'em horns" with the left hand. Both work.

Third...the hardest rule. Who to acknowledge in the hierarchy of cyclists. This is the question where you ask yourself how you view yourself and your relationship to other cyclists. Does a racer (either in team kit or not...I don't race for a team so I'm not in team kit unless I have my coaches kit on) respect say a hybrid rider like Wendy was discussing above? Does a MTBer pedaling home from the local single track on the road or bike path owe a "howdy" to fixie hipster in man-pris off for a double decaf latte at the local poetry slam?

That is a hard question and really forces you to expose your own identity to yourself. I work in bike advocacy along with being a racing cyclist so I have a big tribe, but there are many people out there that I admit to not acknowledging. Delivery people...no. No helmet....NO. Recumbents...NO WAY! Hybrid riders, mostly yes, and this is the group I find the most question with. If you are out there, working hard to get in or stay in shape and you show it by having a well set up bike that fits you and your dressed properly and are wearing your helmet properly (in the correct direction and not tilted back on your head) then you are as much a "cyclist" as I am and am part of my tribe, so you get an acknowledgment. Roadies...yes, but with exclusions. As I said above if you don't have a helmet then I don't acknowledge you. Also, if you wouldn't qualify under the same rules as a hybrid rider then you wouldn't just because you're on a road bike. Tri-athletes, identified by being out on the road on their time trial/tri bike, are usually the worst offenders to not acknowledge you, and since they have decided to flatten out into the tunnel vision of their aero-bars they have already decided to not acknowledge me, so I don't acknowledge them. I have a TT bike and rarely ride it on the road. Its not safe to ride on traffic roads in my opinion so I usually only ride it on closed roads like at the local community college campus with a nice 4 mile loop. Hand cyclists...they are my freakin' heroes so I always take an even greater effort and frequently ride with and talk with them when I can. This happens fairly often on the college loop actually. MTBers...if they are wearing armor and a full faced helmet they are likely downhillers and not part of the tribe, no acknowledgment. It the MTBer is on a x-country or all-mountain bike then they get a good nod.

Alas, that is a lot of "rules" for something so pure as riding your bike, but, then again, I am a dyed in the wool (literally) roadie and racer and I wouldn't be part of the tribe if I didn't adopt some sort of elitism. It just so happens I set my bar much lower than most other roadie elitists do!

http://www.mathewingram.com/work/wp-content/uploads/elitism-poster.jpg

redbike
08-11-2009, 05:41 PM
I am a roadie (except when riding mt'n bikes with my wife & son) but even though I appreciate the tribal hierarchy described above, I nod or say "hi" to just about everyone I encounter on my rides. Thankfully there aren't many who aren't wearing helmets. I do acknowledge those few riding on the wrong side of the road with a fixed glare.

perry
08-11-2009, 06:31 PM
When I'm on my bike, I've noticed that not many people return waves. When I'm running, I've noticed that just about everyone smiles and waves. So, yea... :confused:

Still scared of clipless. Don't need my legs swelling together. But I have a nice gouge on the back of my left ankle from my foot slipping off the pedal last week, so I need something other than the platforms that came on my bike. Nashbar sells some miniclips. And there's Power Grips. Maybe one of those would help me get used to the feeling of being connected to the bike? And MTB shoes w/o cleats on them for better power xfer? Or just quit being a wimp?

Brodirt
08-11-2009, 07:57 PM
Still scared of clipless. Don't need my legs swelling together. But I have a nice gouge on the back of my left ankle from my foot slipping off the pedal last week, so I need something other than the platforms that came on my bike. Nashbar sells some miniclips. And there's Power Grips. Maybe one of those would help me get used to the feeling of being connected to the bike? And MTB shoes w/o cleats on them for better power xfer? Or just quit being a wimp?

Perry, straps in any form are more dangerous and difficult to use than clipless pedals. I know many people see straps as an intermediary step between platforms and clipless, but they really are the most difficult setup to use and to use safely. I suggest you trying clipless pedals, but if you truly are scared get a very inexpensive set of platforms with SPD style clipless system on one side. You can learn as you go with that method.

Wendy
08-11-2009, 08:24 PM
Wendy, just do what I do, bring water balloons. :devil:

Fun? Yes, but they could catch me. Their bikes are faster :eek:

Wendy
08-11-2009, 09:03 PM
I do acknowledge those few riding on the wrong side of the road with a fixed glare.

What is wrong with people. I do not understand why they can not stay on their side. I went on a recovery ride tonight. I wanted to see if I could ride after dumping this morning. I almost slammed into a guy on a joy ride who could not decide which lane he was in. I announced myself passing on the left he then immediately came over to the left lane so I swerved to go back in the right lane, then he started back that way, I nailed my brakes, yelled and told him to pick a lane. I do not even know if he heard anything I think he may have had music on but he sure did not bother to look. There were too many people like him tonight so I cut my ride real short in fear of turning my black and blue bruises to something even worse. :frown:

Wendy
08-11-2009, 09:10 PM
There are two kinds of cyclist...those that have crashed and those that are going to crash. I hope you feel better, but it comes with the territory.

I knew it was just a matter of time. Thankfully we were not at full speed, nor did I dump on the main road. That would have been ugly in rush hour. It must be in the blood by daughter fell off the back of my husband tandem bike tonight. Thankfully I had moved on ahead of them and did not witness that.

Wendy
08-11-2009, 09:22 PM
Alas, that is a lot of "rules" for something so pure as riding your bike, but, then again, I am a dyed in the wool (literally) roadie and racer and I wouldn't be part of the tribe if I didn't adopt some sort of elitism. It just so happens I set my bar much lower than most other roadie elitists do!



You forgot one type. What about the terribly odd looking comfort bikes that look like the handle bars are on stilts? Also I stand corrected by my husband I have a Trek FX3 fitness bike not hybrid. Whatever!!!! I thought they were the same.

gearguywb
08-12-2009, 03:48 AM
I have often seen the "elitist" type of behavior from roadies but rarely from mountain bikers. Vastly different cultures. I remember the first road race I attended (after several mountian bike races) I could not believe the number of stuck p acting cat 4 riders. Hey, it is a race, but for the vast majority of us we would be well served by remembering that our monthly mortgage payment is not dependant on how well we ride....

Brodirt
08-12-2009, 05:14 AM
You forgot one type. What about the terribly odd looking comfort bikes that look like the handle bars are on stilts? Also I stand corrected by my husband I have a Trek FX3 fitness bike not hybrid. Whatever!!!! I thought they were the same.

Wendy, I don't discern between "fitness" or "hybrid" bikes they are, for all intents and purposes the same. I wouldn't discern between riders on either type as well...if you are well fitted and well kitted you are part of the tribe!

In fact, having thought about it for a while, I would say that there is a certain breed of hard core roadie that I admonish over all others...the guy with the full blown pro-kit and matching bike. He is usually reasonably fit but has more money than fitness or style...he is often referred to as a "dentist!" In years past it's usually a guy on a Discovery Channel Trek Madone with full Discovery Channel team kit, down to matching Giro Atmos helmet and while pro riders wear whatever shoes they choose, this creature can frequently be seen wearing the Nike "Texas Champ" shoe. I have even recently started to see some Astana kit out there on the road, and all I can do with that is hang my head in shame. I'm a Lance fan too but if you buy Astana kit you are announcing you know nothing about Lance and the sport of cycling other than that Lance was on Astana this year. You had no idea that he really had little to do with the "team" other than in name. The guy deserves a lot of the worship that he gets, but if you want to represent the LA brand in 2009 then you should be wearing a Mellow Johnny's team kit or a Livestrong kit!

Ok...there goes my bit of roadie elitism for you this morning!

Brodirt
08-12-2009, 01:59 PM
I'm going to have a used set of Spinergy Stealth SS wheels for Campagnolo 10 speed available next week when my new wheels come in.

They are 2 years old and are in excellent used shape. They have never been crashed or needed truing. They came with a slight burr in the alloy braking surface that sanded off in about 5 seconds with ultra-fine emory paper. They are still produced and cost about $700-$850 on line.

I would let them go for $350,if anyone is interested pm me...here they are on my bike:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3258/2911086652_d8bc87a14f.jpg

here is a link to the Road Bike Review listing for them:
http://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/wheels/wheelsets/spinergy-inc/PRD_347778_2490crx.aspx

TimmyBoston
08-12-2009, 10:11 PM
At first I thought you were selling that entire bike for $350. I think broke my ring finger trying to PM fast enough. :biggrin:

TimmyBoston
08-12-2009, 10:11 PM
What's a chain tool?

koso
08-13-2009, 02:35 AM
I was a commuter on a Trek 7100 for several years... until I got laid off.

My standard rule of thumb was, "The brighter the spandex, the bigger the jerk."

I eventually gave up extending greetings to anybody. I will happily return one.


One bit I learned from putting a few thousand miles on a base model hybrid: If you're going to ride a lot, spend the money up front on a better bike. You'll save a lot of time, trouble and money replacing worn out or broken components. Best compliment I ever got, from a wrench at the LBS: You ride the s*** out of this thing, huh?

gearguywb
08-13-2009, 03:39 AM
What's a chain tool?

Allows you to break/repair a bike chain. Pretty darn handy item to have, especially mountain biking. I found that out the hard way.

SRock
08-13-2009, 04:14 AM
My new bike (Just picked it up about an hour ago):

GeorgeIV
08-13-2009, 05:51 AM
I have an old GT Outpost that I did a fixed gear city bike conversion on. Schwalbe Super Marathon tires, rack and fenders, White Industries Eno fixed gear hub, and an ugly rattle-can paint job. It's fun.

My road bike is a Gunnar Roadie with Easton carbon fiber bits, Dura-ace/Ultegra SL drivetrain, and Chris King everything. I spent months researching the build, and aquiring the parts.

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/picture.php?albumid=668&pictureid=1010

Sorry the picture's out of focus.

A Surly Crosscheck with an ever-changing mix of components (my CX race bike) and an '08 Trek 8500 mountain bike round out my stable. Nothing like working part time at a shop to give you a killer case of BAD (bicycle aquisition disorder).

SRock
08-13-2009, 05:56 AM
I have an old GT Outpost that I did a fixed gear city bike conversion on. Schwalbe Super Marathon tires, rack and fenders, White Industries Eno fixed gear hub, and an ugly rattle-can paint job. It's fun.

My road bike is a Gunnar Roadie with Easton carbon fiber bits, Dura-ace/Ultegra SL drivetrain, and Chris King everything. I spent months researching the build, and aquiring the parts.

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/picture.php?albumid=668&pictureid=1010

Sorry the picture's out of focus.

A Surly Crosscheck with an ever-changing mix of components (my CX race bike) and an '08 Trek 8500 mountain bike round out my stable. Nothing like working part time at a shop to give you a killer case of BAD (bicycle aquisition disorder).

Pictures?!?!

Wendy
08-13-2009, 06:31 AM
I was a commuter on a Trek 7100 for several years... until I got laid off.

My standard rule of thumb was, "The brighter the spandex, the bigger the jerk."

I eventually gave up extending greetings to anybody. I will happily return one.


One bit I learned from putting a few thousand miles on a base model hybrid: If you're going to ride a lot, spend the money up front on a better bike. You'll save a lot of time, trouble and money replacing worn out or broken components. Best compliment I ever got, from a wrench at the LBS: You ride the s*** out of this thing, huh?

I am toying with the idea of a road bike. I have the Trek 7.3FX fitness now, previously I said FX3 I must have done too many 12oz curls that day. :confused: I bought this bike the end of June and knock on wood, no troubles. I only have about 800 miles on it so far though. Both my brother and I purchased one the same day and he has had to take his in for gearing trouble already.

I would have to keep my current bike because weekends I do take my kids for a ride. The LBS said no way could I pull 150 buggy behind me on a road bike, nor the baby seat. Besides I would look pretty ridiculous doing so.


Any recommendations for an entry level road bike?

GeorgeIV
08-13-2009, 06:38 AM
Pictures?!?!


Is it not displaying? I uploaded it to an album here. Check this link if you can't see it: Gunnar (http://badgerandblade.com/vb/picture.php?albumid=668&pictureid=1010)

I don't have pics of the others. In fact, I wouldn't have a pic of this one, except my shop wanted to post it on their Twitter page.

Brodirt
08-13-2009, 07:30 AM
I would have to keep my current bike because weekends I do take my kids for a ride. The LBS said no way could I pull 150 buggy behind me on a road bike, nor the baby seat. Besides I would look pretty ridiculous doing so.


Any recommendations for an entry level road bike?

1. I used to pull a Burley trailer with my 2 kids in it on my Eddy Merckx race bike. Before that my brother in law, who handed the Burley down to me, used to pull it on his Colnago. You will have no issues pulling it on a road bike.

2. If you give me a budget and what you desire in a road bike I would be glad to offer advice. I am working with another brother in law on the same issue right now and he is coming from a similar bike to yours, is a similarly situated rider as you and has a budge of $800. So just let me know.

Wendy
08-13-2009, 01:28 PM
1. I used to pull a Burley trailer with my 2 kids in it on my Eddy Merckx race bike. Before that my brother in law, who handed the Burley down to me, used to pull it on his Colnago. You will have no issues pulling it on a road bike.

2. If you give me a budget and what you desire in a road bike I would be glad to offer advice. I am working with another brother in law on the same issue right now and he is coming from a similar bike to yours, is a similarly situated rider as you and has a budge of $800. So just let me know.

That is good news. Other than the fact it swayed my purchasing decision. I specifically told the LBS that I tugged my girls behind on weekends and some evenings and they said no way. I did not question it because I have never noticed anyone pulling their kids on a road bike. I just bought this bike the end of June.

I just came back from doctors and apparently I am going to be off my bike about 6 weeks after my surgery at the end of August. I had no idea. I assumed I would be back riding in 7-10 days. I hope the 6 weeks thing is taking in consideration the wimps, which I refuse to be. I will probably look at buying in late winter to early spring. I was thinking $1200-$1500 would be okay for now. I have so many other things on my want/need list.

One good thing I can always get guilt free money from my hubby between December & March. I have my b-day, x-mas, valentines and anniversary. That should be worth at least $1000. :biggrin:

TimmyBoston
08-13-2009, 02:10 PM
I just came back from doctors and apparently I am going to be off my bike about 6 weeks after my surgery at the end of August. I had no idea. I assumed I would be back riding in 7-10 days. I hope the 6 weeks thing is taking in consideration the wimps, which I refuse to be. I will probably look at buying in late winter to early spring.

Wendy as someone who has gone under the knife more time than I can count, take the doctors words seriously. I played D-1 sports so I don't consider myself a wimp either, but you will need to rest and really let your body heal. Surgery, especially sports related injuries can really set your body back. I am sorry your injury was severe enough that you need surgery. But if it makes you feel any better, I have always had much more luck getting surgery than trying rehab and the other non-invasive options.

moonshine44
08-13-2009, 03:46 PM
When you start bike shopping, I would definitely give Specialized a long hard look if I were you. I recently found a tiny hairline crack in the aluminum frame of my Specialized Roubaix. The frame was guaranteed for life, but since they quit putting aluminum frames on the Roubaix bikes (they went to carbon), they replaced the whole bike. I thought that was excellent customer service.

Mysterion
08-13-2009, 05:18 PM
Best of luck with the surgery, Wendy. My wife went through it, and the rehab was long, but she is back to being a daily gym rat and runner.

When you're ready to go bike shopping, consider: The most important factor in your new bike is fit. There's no getting around it--if the bike is a bad fit, it really doesn't matter if it has a great component package, or a really cool wheelset. Because women are differently proportioned from men, many benefit from a women-specific road bike. In addition to a frame that's adjusted for women's typically shorter upper body and longer legs, a fem-spec bike may have shorter-reach brake levers, differently proportioned handlebars, saddle, etc. A number of companies have options, at various price points.

Of course, many women can ride standard bikes comfortably, but it's nice to have the option. Above all, it's really crucial to get a bike that fits, and to find a salesperson who is really knowledgeable. Not always easy, but worth it in the long run.

Brodirt
08-13-2009, 05:26 PM
That is good news. Other than the fact it swayed my purchasing decision. I specifically told the LBS that I tugged my girls behind on weekends and some evenings and they said no way. I did not question it because I have never noticed anyone pulling their kids on a road bike. I just bought this bike the end of June.

I just came back from doctors and apparently I am going to be off my bike about 6 weeks after my surgery at the end of August. I had no idea. I assumed I would be back riding in 7-10 days. I hope the 6 weeks thing is taking in consideration the wimps, which I refuse to be. I will probably look at buying in late winter to early spring. I was thinking $1200-$1500 would be okay for now. I have so many other things on my want/need list.

One good thing I can always get guilt free money from my hubby between December & March. I have my b-day, x-mas, valentines and anniversary. That should be worth at least $1000. :biggrin:

Ok Wendy...heal up and stay healthy. I'm here to discuss this with you when you want. $1200-$1500 is a sweet spot in the market. You could get some great stuff there. I agree that Specialized makes a great product but at your price its cutting it close. They get a bit of a premium and these days I start with Giant as the best bike for the money at almost any price point, and certainly at your price point...they, along with Specialized, are also tops in the ladies bike market too. See if you have a Giant dealer close by and take a look at the great stuff you can get, in carbon, from them and then think about it and get back to me...us here. There are lots of smart, experienced voices here to give you some help.

Feel well.

perry
08-13-2009, 06:49 PM
I am toying with the idea of a road bike. I have the Trek 7.3FX fitness now, previously I said FX3 I must have done too many 12oz curls that day. :confused: I bought this bike the end of June and knock on wood, no troubles. I only have about 800 miles on it so far though. Both my brother and I purchased one the same day and he has had to take his in for gearing trouble already.


That's pretty good! I got my 7.3 Fx on July 3 and only have around 225 miles. But I've also been running some days, but, still.

I've had a heckuva problem getting my front brakes adjusted right.

Wendy
08-13-2009, 08:00 PM
Wendy as someone who has gone under the knife more time than I can count, take the doctors words seriously. I played D-1 sports so I don't consider myself a wimp either, but you will need to rest and really let your body heal. Surgery, especially sports related injuries can really set your body back. I am sorry your injury was severe enough that you need surgery. But if it makes you feel any better, I have always had much more luck getting surgery than trying rehab and the other non-invasive options.

The real kicker is that I had no idea I had damaged my shoulder so badly. I thought I had slept funny on it until the pain lasted 6 weeks. I did very heavy weight lifting years ago and probably did most of the damage then. I had just started back with weights about 6 months ago and apparently did my shoulder in. I always use free weights ( I hate cheating machines) so I guess my shoulders were just not able to keep up with the weight I used for lower body. I guess Bo flex may get some of my money in the near future.

Wendy
08-13-2009, 08:08 PM
When you're ready to go bike shopping, consider: The most important factor in your new bike is fit. There's no getting around it--if the bike is a bad fit, it really doesn't matter if it has a great component package, or a really cool wheelset. Because women are differently proportioned from men, many benefit from a women-specific road bike.

I am on a mens bike now. Not necessarily that the women's was not a good fit but I could not ride a gold bike : ) The 7.3 FX for the 19 inch womens only came in gold. YUK. Who really rides a gold bike??

I really had no idea about fitting on a bike until I got this one. I argued with the sales guys on the size of bike I wanted, Thankfully I listened to them. Now I look at the dorks in the morning riding on a tiny or huge bike. That was me a few months ago. :ohmy:

Wendy
08-13-2009, 08:10 PM
That's pretty good! I got my 7.3 Fx on July 3 and only have around 225 miles. But I've also been running some days, but, still.

I've had a heckuva problem getting my front brakes adjusted right.

You missed Trek's sale by a few days. June they were $100 off I only paid $530.
I thankfully have not had a lick of problems but my bro does with the gearing.

Wendy
08-13-2009, 08:16 PM
I agree that Specialized makes a great product but at your price its cutting it close. They get a bit of a premium and these days I start with Giant as the best bike for the money at almost any price point, and certainly at your price point...they, along with Specialized, are also tops in the ladies bike market too. See if you have a Giant dealer close by and take a look at the great stuff you can get, in carbon, from them and then think about it and get back to me...us here. There are lots of smart, experienced voices here to give you some help.

Feel well.

We do have a local dealer for Giant and Specialized. No way could I purchase anything from them. They are way too proud. Their prices have went through the roof in the last year it is sick. It would be a good place to find what I like and take the info to the internet. Heck maybe by next year I will be ready to up the ante. Thank you all for all of your input. Hell maybe I will want to be the one pulling a fancy bike out of a POS car. I could always downgrade my car. :c1::c1::c1:

SRock
08-14-2009, 01:29 AM
Wendy, best of luck with your surgery. Keep in mind no matter how tough you think you are or even how tough you really are surgery is a major event no matter how minor they try to portray it. Take you time getting back on that back. Best of luck, you'll be in my thoughts/prayers when the time comes.


Is it not displaying? I uploaded it to an album here. Check this link if you can't see it: Gunnar (http://badgerandblade.com/vb/picture.php?albumid=668&pictureid=1010)

I don't have pics of the others. In fact, I wouldn't have a pic of this one, except my shop wanted to post it on their Twitter page.

It's up now. I wouldn't mind seeing your fixed gear GT if you get time.


When you start bike shopping, I would definitely give Specialized a long hard look if I were you. I recently found a tiny hairline crack in the aluminum frame of my Specialized Roubaix. The frame was guaranteed for life, but since they quit putting aluminum frames on the Roubaix bikes (they went to carbon), they replaced the whole bike. I thought that was excellent customer service.

Specialized makes great bikes. I had a Hard Rock a few years back and it was a fantastic bike.

I had my first ride today. 10 miles! Not bad for a short ride. However, that was after my lower body work out and a 3 mile run. I actually feel pretty good, but my bum is sore. Been a while since I road any real distance.

perry
08-14-2009, 03:15 AM
You missed Trek's sale by a few days. June they were $100 off I only paid $530.

They were further discounted in July and I went back for a price match - $500 :wink:

Wendy
08-14-2009, 06:42 AM
They were further discounted in July and I went back for a price match - $500 :wink:

I actually went in the store in the beginning of July and the bikes were marked $639.00 but I received a mailer showing them priced at $500. My brother and I had both bought at the $530 so he went up and stirred a little crap and got us a $60 in store credit. They had us believing the sale ended June 30th.

King of Kailua
08-14-2009, 09:40 AM
Just remember, performance it's the name of the game! :biggrin:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn29DvMITu4

TimmyBoston
08-15-2009, 09:39 PM
I have a set of Nashbar Izoard pedals, they are Look Keo-style pedals. Sometimes I want to go for a casual, slow ride and clipping in makes things much harder. Is there an attachment that would be more like a traditional pedal that would go over the Look pedals so I could go on these easy rides wearing street shoes and not risk tipping over like an idiot when I'm going too slow?

TimmyBoston
08-15-2009, 11:13 PM
I'm still in the market for a rear rack that will work with my road bike.

Sadly, I have very little so I have been looking at these models? Any advice?

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_216924_-1

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_120260_-1

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_216852_-1

If these are all junk, any recommendations for a different one in the same price range.

I was looking at this trunk bag to go with it.
http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_166951_-1

SRock
08-16-2009, 03:40 AM
I'm still in the market for a rear rack that will work with my road bike.

Sadly, I have very little so I have been looking at these models? Any advice?

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_216924_-1

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_120260_-1

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_216852_-1

If these are all junk, any recommendations for a different one in the same price range.

I was looking at this trunk bag to go with it.
http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10053_10052_166951_-1

Thanks for posting this Tim, I'm looking for a rack and bag for my new bike as well. My ride home from work on Friday was great all except for the 20lbs of crap I had to carry in a backpack! I'll be checking back for everyones answers as well.

Mysterion
08-16-2009, 07:20 AM
Tim, I believe your Trek's frame has eyelets which allow you to run a conventional rear rack--that is, one with full struts, rather than a seatpost-only mount. There are plenty of serviceable racks out there that will work, and even a few very pricey high-end units. That said, get a Blackburn rack and be done with it--they're the industry standard for quality rear racks, and have been since Jim Blackburn started hand-welding them in the '70s. They cost a bit more ($40-50,) but they're light, strong, and they don't break. Period. I can't recall ever warrantying one when I worked in shops. Model choice is mostly based on wheel size: For a road bike's 700c hoops, look at the XR-1, or the EX-1, (http://www.blackburndesign.com/racks.html) if you're going to be carrying really heavy loads.

Topeak (http://www.topeak.com/products/Racks) makes some very decent racks if you're looking for a quick-release unit, though you'll be much more limited on load-carrying ability.

Brodirt
08-16-2009, 01:10 PM
I'm still in the market for a rear rack that will work with my road bike.

For what purpose will you be using the rack?

Mysterion
08-16-2009, 01:50 PM
Tim, I must correct myself. The specs I looked at were in error; your frame doesn't appear to have full rack mounts, which would complicate installation a bit. You're probably better off with a seatpost-mount rack, and limiting your loads.

perry
08-16-2009, 06:03 PM
I ordered Kool Stop v-brake inserts http://www.amazon.com/Kool-Stop-Bicycle-Inserts-Salmon/dp/B001CK0G06/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1250468171&sr=8-1

Little did I know that the brake pads on my bike (Trek FX 7.3, Avid SD-3 brakes) aren't really replaceable. At least, I couldn't figure out how the pad comes off the holder. I obviously have not done this before and am learning as I go.

Kool Stop has pads for every type of brakes and I'm not sure what exactly I need now. Would this be what I need http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR401D10-Kool-Stop+Mtn+Shoes.aspx? Will I be able to use the inserts down the road, or should I send them back?

SRock
08-16-2009, 06:27 PM
OK guys, it's been a while since I regularly rode a bike. I've now made it a mainstay in my daily activity. I'm not logging 60 mile rides like some but primarily using it to commute back and forth to work (16 miles round trip) and the gym (4 miles round trip) but my arse is killing me! Any suggestions or recommendations? Will the rear end adjust to it?

TimmyBoston
08-16-2009, 06:39 PM
OK guys, it's been a while since I regularly rode a bike. I've now made it a mainstay in my daily activity. I'm not logging 60 mile rides like some but primarily using it to commute back and forth to work (16 miles round trip) and the gym (4 miles round trip) but my arse is killing me! Any suggestions or recommendations? Will the rear end adjust to it?

Rob, I'm anything but an expert. This summer is the first time I road a bike since 8th grade, 14 years ago. But you definitely do do some adjusting. Thinks definitely got easier for me in a couple weeks.

Look at changing your saddle. My family purchased a couple new Treks this summer and I thought the seats were terrible. I don't care for the huge padded things at many of the stores, but you should be able to find a better one than some of the standard saddles today.

Also look into padded bike shorts. They really help. I took a couple easy rides on a hybrid today, not the road bike I ride everyday, figuring I'm going slow and easy, I won't need my shorts. It definitely wasn't very comfortable despite having one of those big plush seats.

Mysterion
08-16-2009, 06:39 PM
I ordered Kool Stop v-brake inserts http://www.amazon.com/Kool-Stop-Bicycle-Inserts-Salmon/dp/B001CK0G06/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1250468171&sr=8-1

Little did I know that the brake pads on my bike (Trek FX 7.3, Avid SD-3 brakes) aren't really replaceable. At least, I couldn't figure out how the pad comes off the holder. I obviously have not done this before and am learning as I go.

Kool Stop has pads for every type of brakes and I'm not sure what exactly I need now. Would this be what I need http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR401D10-Kool-Stop+Mtn+Shoes.aspx? Will I be able to use the inserts down the road, or should I send them back?
You're correct, the pads on your brakes are not replaceable. You could upgrade your Avid brakes with these brake shoes, (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR407D01-Avid+Rim+Wrangler+2.aspx) which feature replaceable pads, and hold on to the Koolstop pads for future use. I'm a fan of Koolstops, particularly the red compound--smooth, quiet pads that don't chew up rims.

RazorDingo
08-16-2009, 06:45 PM
OK guys, it's been a while since I regularly rode a bike. ...but my arse is killing me

First off, don't apologise for the distances you are putting in. A sixteen mile daily commute by bike is impressive by any standard. Doing it five days a week or so - means you are probably putting in more miles than many poseurs out there.

Next up: Arse pain. You mention that its been a while since you rode regularly. People who put in a lot of miles on the bike (> 30 miles a week, like you are doing) soon develop toughened "ischial tuberosities" - or the little pointy bits at the bottom of your pelvis. This is where most of your weight is carried on the bike. Taking even a couple of winter months off, like many recreational cyclists do, allows this area to become tender again come springtime.

Tough it out for a couple of weeks, and your skeletal system will respond by developing callouses (or whatever the osteopathological term for it is) on your sit bones. And the "arse pain" will be behind you. (Groaning about all the puns I've slipped in there..)

Other than that: I assume you are wearing decent shorts with chamois inserts. Wear clean ones every day. And make sure you have a relatively firm, narrow saddle, and that it is properly adjusted for you and your bike.

perry
08-16-2009, 06:54 PM
Mysterion, thanks. I was also thinking of upgrading to the SD-7 - http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR306A00-Avid+Single+Digit+7+Linear+Pull+Brake.aspx That would kill two birds with one stone, right? Would i need anything other than an allen wrench to do the swap? Should be able to just use the cables and stuff from my SD-3, right? These front brakes have been nothing but a headache since I bought the bike, though they've forced me to learn a bit.

Brodirt
08-16-2009, 06:55 PM
First off, don't apologise for the distances you are putting in. A sixteen mile daily commute by bike is impressive by any standard. Doing it five days a week or so - means you are probably putting in more miles than many poseurs out there.

Next up: Arse pain. You mention that its been a while since you rode regularly. People who put in a lot of miles on the bike (> 30 miles a week, like you are doing) soon develop toughened "ischial tuberosities" - or the little pointy bits at the bottom of your pelvis. This is where most of your weight is carried on the bike. Taking even a couple of winter months off, like many recreational cyclists do, allows this area to become tender again come springtime.

Tough it out for a couple of weeks, and your skeletal system will respond by developing callouses (or whatever the osteopathological term for it is) on your sit bones. And the "arse pain" will be behind you. (Groaning about all the puns I've slipped in there..)

Other than that: I assume you are wearing decent shorts with chamois inserts. Wear clean ones every day. And make sure you have a relatively firm, narrow saddle, and that it is properly adjusted for you and your bike.

Sage words of wisdom all...especially the bolded section. Don't be duped into thinking heavily padded saddles are the solution, the opposite is the case in fact. A lightly padded saddle also gives a consistent stable platform from which to leverage your pedaling without rocking or bobbing. This stability leads to the finite adaptations, mentioned above, that your body makes. When you ride with a padded saddle you bounce around so much that it leads to poor bio-mechanical pedaling efficiency as well as an "arse" lacking the constitution to put up with the daily rigors of riding.

Oh, and by the way, a 16 mile daily commute is very rigorous. Don't talk down about it. You are working quite hard. I didn't start out racing and training 160-200 miles a week...I probably started with between 40-70 miles a week. Keep up the good work.

Brodirt
08-16-2009, 07:06 PM
I ordered Kool Stop v-brake inserts http://www.amazon.com/Kool-Stop-Bicycle-Inserts-Salmon/dp/B001CK0G06/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1250468171&sr=8-1

Little did I know that the brake pads on my bike (Trek FX 7.3, Avid SD-3 brakes) aren't really replaceable. At least, I couldn't figure out how the pad comes off the holder. I obviously have not done this before and am learning as I go.

Kool Stop has pads for every type of brakes and I'm not sure what exactly I need now. Would this be what I need http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR401D10-Kool-Stop+Mtn+Shoes.aspx? Will I be able to use the inserts down the road, or should I send them back?


You're correct, the pads on your brakes are not replaceable. You could upgrade your Avid brakes with these brake shoes, (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR407D01-Avid+Rim+Wrangler+2.aspx) which feature replaceable pads, and hold on to the Koolstop pads for future use. I'm a fan of Koolstops, particularly the red compound--smooth, quiet pads that don't chew up rims.


Mysterion, thanks. I was also thinking of upgrading to the SD-7 - http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BR306A00-Avid+Single+Digit+7+Linear+Pull+Brake.aspx That would kill two birds with one stone, right? Would i need anything other than an allen wrench to do the swap? Should be able to just use the cables and stuff from my SD-3, right? These front brakes have been nothing but a headache since I bought the bike, though they've forced me to learn a bit.

Swapping brake pads requires an allen wrench as you mentioned, but it also helps to have another tool and some knowledge.

The tool is a third hand. You might be able to get away with a pad/shoe swap without readjusting the brakes, but you will probably need the third hand. This is a tool that holds the pads against the rim while you reseat the control cable. It is the first specialized bike tool that an interested person should purchase.

Specific knowledge you might require is regarding toeing. The brake shoes should make contact at the back of the shoe, away from rotational direction first. This prevents chatter, squealing, uneven pad wear and results in better modulation and, thus, better, safer breaking. It does this because when the pads touch the rim at the back, first the rotation of the rim, and the friction of the pad, actually help to pull the rest of the pad into contact with the rim and continue to add some additiaonal force to the braking force that you are applying. To accomplish this the new shoes usually have an eccentric concave shaped washer that fits into and eccentric convex shaped washer, or fixture on the shoe itself. The rotation of the concave vs the convex allows for toeing adjustment. Check it out on the internets.

As for V-brakes in generally...very finicky items. That noodle really screws things up. If you truly are going to change you could think about high quality cantilevers and a roller adjuster to replace the noodle. I used such a system on a cyclocross race bike a few years ago and it worked flawlessly. A bit more difficult to set up initially, but the learning curve is short and the system holds up better over time and works better, in my opinion, that do V-brakes.

Kool-stop makes excellent products. I use their road pads for carbon rims on both my time trial and road race bike, on both Campy and Zero-G calipers. They have treated my carbon race wheels very well. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend their products.

perry
08-16-2009, 07:22 PM
To accomplish this the new shoes usually have an eccentric concave shaped washer that fits into and eccentric convex shaped washer, or fixture on the shoe itself. The rotation of the concave vs the convex allows for toeing adjustment. Check it out on the internets.

I've checked the Internets and it makes my head hurt! The washers are starting to make sense though. The park tool website suggested a rubber band shim to set the toe, and that did seem to get rid of the squealing the brakes were making.

Interestingly, the squealing began after I took the bike back to the shop and complained about the front tire rubbing. They adjusted the brakes and the rubbing went away, but the squealing started up. At the end of my ride tonight, some rubbing came back.

Anyways, I was mainly concerned if I would need any sort of cable tools or to do something with my existing noodle. The SD-7 is just a few bucks more than the Rim Wrangler 2's by themselves, so I may give that a try. Someone on bikeforums did the swap on his FX 7.5 and said it helped immensely - his stock brakes, the same as mine, were going out of alignment all the time. I just ride on bike paths, and this is my first bike since high school, so I don't want to get too deep in to $$ investments.. If I remain interested in the hobby, I'll better know what to get for a second bike and, then, a third bike... :)

Thanks!

TimmyBoston
08-16-2009, 10:48 PM
For what purpose will you be using the rack?

Light touring, light camping gear, maybe some lunch or some rain gear. A few groceries, nothing outlandish at this point.


Is there any attachment I can add to my Look Keo pedals so I can pedal with my street shoes as opposed to my cycling shoes?

SRock
08-17-2009, 03:27 AM
Rob, I'm anything but an expert. This summer is the first time I road a bike since 8th grade, 14 years ago. But you definitely do do some adjusting. Thinks definitely got easier for me in a couple weeks.

Look at changing your saddle. My family purchased a couple new Treks this summer and I thought the seats were terrible. I don't care for the huge padded things at many of the stores, but you should be able to find a better one than some of the standard saddles today.

Also look into padded bike shorts. They really help. I took a couple easy rides on a hybrid today, not the road bike I ride everyday, figuring I'm going slow and easy, I won't need my shorts. It definitely wasn't very comfortable despite having one of those big plush seats.

I considered padded shorts but part of my problem is that I ride in wearing my PT uniform for my morning PT session. I get there and immediately begin my morning workout. Would padded shorts be a total disaster to do calisthenics in? What about running? Most mornings I run around 3-5 miles before hopping back on my bike and heading home to get ready for work.


First off, don't apologise for the distances you are putting in. A sixteen mile daily commute by bike is impressive by any standard. Doing it five days a week or so - means you are probably putting in more miles than many poseurs out there.

Next up: Arse pain. You mention that its been a while since you rode regularly. People who put in a lot of miles on the bike (> 30 miles a week, like you are doing) soon develop toughened "ischial tuberosities" - or the little pointy bits at the bottom of your pelvis. This is where most of your weight is carried on the bike. Taking even a couple of winter months off, like many recreational cyclists do, allows this area to become tender again come springtime.

Tough it out for a couple of weeks, and your skeletal system will respond by developing callouses (or whatever the osteopathological term for it is) on your sit bones. And the "arse pain" will be behind you. (Groaning about all the puns I've slipped in there..)

Other than that: I assume you are wearing decent shorts with chamois inserts. Wear clean ones every day. And make sure you have a relatively firm, narrow saddle, and that it is properly adjusted for you and your bike.

Thanks for the info, I kind of suspected that to be the case. Many years ago I rode freestyle. And while you spend a great deal of time off of the seat I still got a little saddle sore at the start of each spring/summer season. Later in the year I was G2G.

Oh and no, most of the time I'm either wearing running shorts or my military uniform.


Sage words of wisdom all...especially the bolded section. Don't be duped into thinking heavily padded saddles are the solution, the opposite is the case in fact. A lightly padded saddle also gives a consistent stable platform from which to leverage your pedaling without rocking or bobbing. This stability leads to the finite adaptations, mentioned above, that your body makes. When you ride with a padded saddle you bounce around so much that it leads to poor bio-mechanical pedaling efficiency as well as an "arse" lacking the constitution to put up with the daily rigors of riding.

Oh, and by the way, a 16 mile daily commute is very rigorous. Don't talk down about it. You are working quite hard. I didn't start out racing and training 160-200 miles a week...I probably started with between 40-70 miles a week. Keep up the good work.

Thanks for the kind words and the advice.

I have another question for everyone. When I'm peddling and my leg is in the down stroke how straight should my leg actually be? I've seen many diagrams where it looks like the rider's leg is almost straight. Right now I feel like my seat and handlebars are at a good height for me to ride comfortably, but my legs really aren't that straight at all.

Mysterion
08-17-2009, 08:15 AM
I've checked the Internets and it makes my head hurt! The washers are starting to make sense though. The park tool website suggested a rubber band shim to set the toe, and that did seem to get rid of the squealing the brakes were making.

Interestingly, the squealing began after I took the bike back to the shop and complained about the front tire rubbing. They adjusted the brakes and the rubbing went away, but the squealing started up. At the end of my ride tonight, some rubbing came back.

Anyways, I was mainly concerned if I would need any sort of cable tools or to do something with my existing noodle. The SD-7 is just a few bucks more than the Rim Wrangler 2's by themselves, so I may give that a try. Someone on bikeforums did the swap on his FX 7.5 and said it helped immensely - his stock brakes, the same as mine, were going out of alignment all the time. I just ride on bike paths, and this is my first bike since high school, so I don't want to get too deep in to $$ investments.. If I remain interested in the hobby, I'll better know what to get for a second bike and, then, a third bike... :)

Thanks!
First things first: If your goal is just to eliminate squealing, it may not be necessary to change your brakes. Toeing the pads as suggested by Brodirt is the first step--some folks swear by toeing-in (the front edges closer to the rim,) others prefer toeing-out (the rear edges closer to the rim.) Toe-in is the traditional and conventional treatment, and it's always been my first instinct. A few other things to look at:

You're on the right track with the Koolstop pads. Koolstop red compound is frequently a good cure for squealing. The softer compound is less prone to "chatter" against the rim's braking surface. It's possible that your currnt pads are a bit "glazed," so you might want to lightly clean their braking surfaces with fine (220 or so) sandpaper.

Contamination of the braking surface is frequently a contributor to noisy brakes. Clean the rims with rubbing alcohol to get rid of any greasy deposits. If they're really nasty, you may want to use some 0000 steel wool.

Make sure the brakes are properly installed: If the arms are even a bit loose, they will be very unhappy. Even details like poor cable routing can contribute to squealing.

It's a good time to take an inventory of your bike's general mechanical condition. A misadjusted headset (the bearing assembly that retains the front fork,) can be an issue with brake noise and effectiveness. You also need to look at your wheels, to make sure the rims are true; you've already noticed some rubbing, and this might be a reflection of poorly aligned rims.

So you've done all that and now you still want to change your brakeset?

You shouldn't need much more than a complete metric allen wrench set, (most everything on a bike can be fixed with a 4,5, or 6mm allen, but you'll need a 3 mm to adjust the brake tension,) and a set of cable cutters. You may not even need to replace the cable, but it's a good idea. Some folks love "third hand" tools, others...not so much. To be honest, I've got one somewhere, but rarely use it. I'd never try to stop someone from using one, but you can probably do a swap without. You will need a set of proper bicycle cable cutters for many jobs, so you might as well get them now. Don't try to get by without--you'll just end up ruining cables and/or housings.

As far as changing out your V-brakes to cantilevers as suggested...There are pros and cons. Along with Brodirt, I prefer cantis, and use them on a few of my frames (including my cyclocross rig,) but I'm not sure if a change-over is necessary for your purposes. Even the cheapest linear-pulls usually provide plenty of raw stopping power, and they're easier to set up. The finesse is in setting them up so you can modulate that braking effort--linear pull tend to be more "either on-or-off" than cantis.

Your bike's frame may not have the proper fittings for cantis, although there are work-arounds--you'd likely have to install cable hangers front and rear, which would require some disassembly of the fork/handlebar/headset assembly, along with changing out some of the spacers in the headset. You'd also probably have to change your brake levers, as most V-brake or linear-pull brake levers won't work with cantis.

There are a number of excellent repair books out there. If you're inclined to work on your bike yourself, this one (http://www.amazon.com/Bicycling-Complete-Bicycle-Maintenance-Repair/dp/1579548830) is a good place to start.

perry
08-17-2009, 05:09 PM
It's a good time to take an inventory of your bike's general mechanical condition. A misadjusted headset (the bearing assembly that retains the front fork,) can be an issue with brake noise and effectiveness. You also need to look at your wheels, to make sure the rims are true; you've already noticed some rubbing, and this might be a reflection of poorly aligned rims.

The bike is less than 2 months old, and I've noticed the odd braking since about week 2. I took it in when it had 100 miles on it for its tune up and mentioned the rubbing. Brought it home and it was still acting up. Took it back, asked about the wheel being true, they adjusted the brakes, and it was ok for a couple days, then the noises started back.

I really don't think I'm ready to switch to cantilevers, because the bike is less than two months old. I think the SD-7 and kool stops would be a cheap enough way of making me happy again.

Mojo88
08-17-2009, 05:31 PM
Just getting back into cycling and this thread has been great. I bought my new bike today, a trek 2200 with front and rear carbon forks. I pick it up next Monday and I feel like a kid waiting for Christmas...:biggrin:

perry
08-18-2009, 07:20 PM
Went riding tonight and my seat was creaking. Go figure. While we were checking out the bike trying to locate the creak, the two guys (employees at the LBS) both told me I needed clipless shoes and pedals. I expressed my reservations about falling over, and they told me to harden up :frown:

SRock
08-18-2009, 07:31 PM
Just getting back into cycling and this thread has been great. I bought my new bike today, a trek 2200 with front and rear carbon forks. I pick it up next Monday and I feel like a kid waiting for Christmas...:biggrin:

:cool:

TimmyBoston
08-18-2009, 09:12 PM
Went riding tonight and my seat was creaking. Go figure. While we were checking out the bike trying to locate the creak, the two guys (employees at the LBS) both told me I needed clipless shoes and pedals. I expressed my reservations about falling over, and they told me to harden up :frown:

How would clipless pedals help your seat from creaking? I'll wait until the experienced guys chime in, but to me that sounds like total BS. At which bike shop were you?

Speaking as someone who has got clipless pedals not too long ago, most likely you will fall over. I did, twice. And I feel I have a few more in future as well.

Live2Ride
08-18-2009, 09:53 PM
Went riding tonight and my seat was creaking. Go figure. While we were checking out the bike trying to locate the creak, the two guys (employees at the LBS) both told me I needed clipless shoes and pedals. I expressed my reservations about falling over, and they told me to harden up :frown:

To which you laughed and said, "You're fired", and walked out, never to return.

Don't take ANY garbage from the local LBS. Even a small town like mine has 5. Three of them will never get another dollar from me. The remaining two are great.

Rincin
08-18-2009, 11:21 PM
An interesting method to stop a squeeking seat. :lol:

Give clipless a go, it really does make cycling more enjoyable.

gearguywb
08-19-2009, 03:34 AM
There are those that are riding clipless and those that are still scared. Make the leap.

Live2Ride
08-19-2009, 11:58 AM
Went riding tonight and my seat was creaking. Go figure. While we were checking out the bike trying to locate the creak, the two guys (employees at the LBS) both told me I needed clipless shoes and pedals. I expressed my reservations about falling over, and they told me to harden up :frown:

Try taking the seat post out, clean it and the tube, put some grease on the seat post (I'm partial to trailer bearing grease) and re-install the seat post. Good luck. Bike noises can be really annoying.

airplanedoc
08-19-2009, 12:11 PM
No idea why your choice of pedals would make your seat creak, But, the switch to clipless is definately worth it in my opinion. Unless you are going to get really serious, I would look at the larger clipless pedals. Mine are pretty small (crank brothers candy C), and really hurt my feet if I hop on the bike for a short ride in street shoes.

AD

perry
08-19-2009, 03:53 PM
We were thinking it was the pedals creaking, because I was hearing the sound as I was pedaling. It felt like there was a little play in the pedals... So the way to fix that would have been to replace the pedals. Hence, clipless. Then we tracked it down to the seat. It's at the top of the post where it attaches to the saddle, someplace. I guess you guys always get your troubleshooting right on the first attempt?

Anyways, my point was more about being skeered to try the pedals. I found the shop through meetup.com because the shop is the meeting point for group rides a few times a week. Friendly enough guys. Haven't bought anything from them.

tblech
08-19-2009, 04:42 PM
How do you shave with a cannondale?

Wendy
08-19-2009, 07:59 PM
What type of gear do you were in cold months to stay comfortable without being bulky?

gearguywb
08-19-2009, 09:01 PM
What type of gear do you were in cold months to stay comfortable without being bulky?

Layering is key. I use a couple of different weights of tights depending on effort and temperature. On my upper boday, a wicking undershirt, wool jersey and a vest or jacket as appropriate. The extremties are the hardest to keep warm. Good wind proof gloves and a cap under the helmet, and shoe covers are a must.

airplanedoc
08-19-2009, 09:09 PM
How do you shave with a cannondale?

Its called road rash, Not a bit of hair left.



I guess you guys always get your troubleshooting right on the first attempt?


Ahh, at least I wasn't the only one to miss that part. I read that you knew it was the seat, then someone told you to change your pedals.

Clipless are the way to go, I would just get the ones that you can still wear street shoes or clip in bike shoes with, I occassionally like to hop on the bike to run to the neighbors, and the postage stamp size pedals hurt without the plate in the bottom of the shoes.

Mojo88
08-20-2009, 05:09 AM
The double vs triple debate:.... I was talking to a friend that rides who probably average 100 per week and the topic of double vs triple came up. I ride a triple as we live in an area that has some fairly hilly terrain. He also rides a triple , but some of the members of the local club will only ride a double. They call the triple the " granny gear" . Personally I just don't care as I am not going to be riding in the tour any time soon, but there seems to be almost an elitist attitude when it comes to topic of which is better. Has anyone else experienced this?

Wendy
08-20-2009, 06:21 AM
Layering is key. I use a couple of different weights of tights depending on effort and temperature. On my upper boday, a wicking undershirt, wool jersey and a vest or jacket as appropriate. The extremties are the hardest to keep warm. Good wind proof gloves and a cap under the helmet, and shoe covers are a must.

Shoe covers, go figure. I had no idea there was such a thing. I was riding this morning it was quite warm but my feet were not. I guess I have my answer now. I must have poor circulation from my past years of smoking that my hands and feet are always cold.

Wendy
08-20-2009, 06:22 AM
How do you shave with a cannondale?

I shaved real well a couple weeks ago with my Trek. :ohmy:

Brodirt
08-20-2009, 06:34 AM
Shoe covers, go figure. I had no idea there was such a thing. I was riding this morning it was quite warm but my feet were not. I guess I have my answer now. I must have poor circulation from my past years of smoking that my hands and feet are always cold.

For when shoe covers aren't enough:

http://www.warmers.com/ItemDetails.aspx?itemid=FW10&pkey=Products%7cGrabber+Warmers%7cFoot+Warmers%2c+ 5+Hour+(10+pair)&pval=0%7c1%7cFW10&pIds=Showcase%7cCategoryID%7citemid

They work great!

RazorDingo
08-20-2009, 08:03 AM
What type of gear do you were in cold months

You folks in Missouri may have a somewhat different definition of "cold" weather than people in the upper midwest.

That said, there are a few fairly basic principles to keep in mind for cold-weather cycling.

1) Vigorous, athletic cycling creates a tremendous amount of body heat. More than enough to keep your core temperature comfortable in all but the most frigid sub-zero conditions. The trick is managing that heat.

2) One of the biggest challenges the winter cyclist faces is managing sweat. This generally means wearing wicking fabrics, such as polypropylene or coolmax underwear. It also means NOT wearing a jacket that will trap that moisture next to your body.

3) The third principle is that cold air temperature plus the 15 - 25 mph headwind cycling creates, means you HAVE to protect your exposed skin from the wind. A long sleeved jersey, plus tights are the minimum for any riding when the temps. drop into the thirties or below. Wind-stopper tights and vest, with coolmax fleece underwear beneath, will keep you plenty warm in virtually any conditions.

4) The fourth principle is that, despite all the body heat you create, your extremities - toes, fingers, and head - need extra protection. This ranges from shoe covers and full-finger gloves in "cool" weather - all the way down to chemical heat packs and lobster-mitt gloves on really brutal days.

To see what is really possible in terms of cold-weather cycling - check out the maniacs at Icebike (http://www.icebike.org/).

Lastly, as a general rule, you ought to go out wearing a little less bulky clothing than you think you'll need. Its amazing how toasty you get after a couple of miles.

Mysterion
08-20-2009, 09:31 AM
Another option: Winter shoes. I love my Lake shoes (http://www.lakecycling.com/mxz302-p-111.html); yes, they're ridiculously expensive, but I've had mine for years, and many thousands of miles. If I added up all the money I spent before on shoe covers and such, these look like a good long-term investment. Like Wendy, my feet are always cold in the winter. These really do the job--I kept up 120-150 miles a week all winter, frequently riding in the teens.

Brodirt
08-20-2009, 09:42 AM
Another option: Winter shoes. I love my Lake shoes (http://www.lakecycling.com/mxz302-p-111.html); yes, they're ridiculously expensive, but I've had mine for years, and many thousands of miles. If I added up all the money I spent before on shoe covers and such, these look like a good long-term investment. Like Wendy, my feet are always cold in the winter. These really do the job--I kept up 120-150 miles a week all winter, frequently riding in the teens.

The Lake winter shoes are excellent. They can be found on line for much cheaper. They are usually the prior year's model and are under $100.00. Well worth it for the person thinking about riding outside.

I think though that riding outside in conditions that would warrant these shoes is usually deep into the winter when you have ice and snow on the road and at that point its best to take it inside.

perry
08-20-2009, 06:37 PM
Tonight our "group" was just the bike shop manager and myself. He offered to loan me a pair of shoes and pedals next time I come out so I can try them out before buying. And adjust my brakes to see if we can get rid of the rubbing.

I got a wool jersey, my first, from Sierra Trading Post yesterday. Nice bright green color! Felt a little itchy when I tried it on, but I think I'll like it.

TimmyBoston
08-20-2009, 07:22 PM
Tonight our "group" was just the bike shop manager and myself. He offered to loan me a pair of shoes and pedals next time I come out so I can try them out before buying. And adjust my brakes to see if we can get rid of the rubbing.

I got a wool jersey, my first, from Sierra Trading Post yesterday. Nice bright green color! Felt a little itchy when I tried it on, but I think I'll like it.

Perry, which bike shop do you go to? And what's the ride like? How fast do you guys go? I may stop by one week.

Wendy
08-20-2009, 08:02 PM
For when shoe covers aren't enough:

http://www.warmers.com/ItemDetails.aspx?itemid=FW10&pkey=Products%7cGrabber+Warmers%7cFoot+Warmers%2c+ 5+Hour+(10+pair)&pval=0%7c1%7cFW10&pIds=Showcase%7cCategoryID%7citemid

They work great!

I will purchasing those real soon. : ) If my feet and hands get cold I am done.

Wendy
08-20-2009, 08:13 PM
You folks in Missouri may have a somewhat different definition of "cold" weather than people in the upper midwest.

That said, there are a few fairly basic principles to keep in mind for cold-weather cycling.

1) Vigorous, athletic cycling creates a tremendous amount of body heat. More than enough to keep your core temperature comfortable in all but the most frigid sub-zero conditions. The trick is managing that heat.

2) One of the biggest challenges the winter cyclist faces is managing sweat. This generally means wearing wicking fabrics, such as polypropylene or coolmax underwear. It also means NOT wearing a jacket that will trap that moisture next to your body.

3) The third principle is that cold air temperature plus the 15 - 25 mph headwind cycling creates, means you HAVE to protect your exposed skin from the wind. A long sleeved jersey, plus tights are the minimum for any riding when the temps. drop into the thirties or below. Wind-stopper tights and vest, with coolmax fleece underwear beneath, will keep you plenty warm in virtually any conditions.

4) The fourth principle is that, despite all the body heat you create, your extremities - toes, fingers, and head - need extra protection. This ranges from shoe covers and full-finger gloves in "cool" weather - all the way down to chemical heat packs and lobster-mitt gloves on really brutal days.

To see what is really possible in terms of cold-weather cycling - check out the maniacs at Icebike (http://www.icebike.org/).

Lastly, as a general rule, you ought to go out wearing a little less bulky clothing than you think you'll need. Its amazing how toasty you get after a couple of miles.

All great info. Thanks. I lived in Michigan years ago that is real cold and I can not handle that type of cold. What we get here in Missouri is plenty cold for me. Chances are I will be investing in an indoor trainer I am a little sissy in the cold :biggrin: The only drawback to indoors is I would not have a riding partner who helps on days like today when I was just to darn tired to get up.

TinFish
08-20-2009, 09:30 PM
The double vs triple debate:.... I was talking to a friend that rides who probably average 100 per week and the topic of double vs triple came up. I ride a triple as we live in an area that has some fairly hilly terrain. He also rides a triple , but some of the members of the local club will only ride a double. They call the triple the " granny gear" . Personally I just don't care as I am not going to be riding in the tour any time soon, but there seems to be almost an elitist attitude when it comes to topic of which is better. Has anyone else experienced this?

In the cycling club I used to ride with, there was a certain amount of machismo attached to riding hilly centuries without the use of the granny gear, but it was in good fun. We didn't have separate clubs for the racing team and the more leisure riders. As to which is better, that depends on how strong a cyclist you are and whether anyone will be impressed if you blow out your knees climbing in too high a gear ( I've done that...no one was impressed) :blushing: I think that no matter how strong you are, it doesn't hurt to have the triple, and there's no shame in using it if you need it, as long as you enjoy your rides.

gearguywb
08-21-2009, 03:22 AM
There are a lot of options when it comes to gearing. A triple is one of them but there certainly is a fair amount of attitude when you show up for a "spirited" ride on one!

Another option is a set of compact cranks. I have been using them for several years now in both Colorado and Western NC. I am not the stereotypical sized climber by any stretch of the imagination. The triple works great for me, and if you are contemplating a century (or more) of very mountainous terrain you can swap out the cassette and get some real climbing gears that pretty much equal what a triple will give you.

perry
08-21-2009, 03:22 AM
Perry, which bike shop do you go to? And what's the ride like? How fast do you guys go? I may stop by one week.

DG Bikes, they're at 86th & The Monon. To the northern terminus of the Monon and back @ 12 - 14mph, MTRF @ 7pm. They're talking about starting a Saturday dinner ride.. ride 10 - 15 miles someplace for dinner, then ride back afterwards.

Scotchd
08-21-2009, 05:11 PM
In the cycling club I used to ride with, there was a certain amount of machismo attached to riding hilly centuries without the use of the granny gear, but it was in good fun. We didn't have separate clubs for the racing team and the more leisure riders. As to which is better, that depends on how strong a cyclist you are and whether anyone will be impressed if you blow out your knees climbing in too high a gear ( I've done that...no one was impressed) :blushing: I think that no matter how strong you are, it doesn't hurt to have the triple, and there's no shame in using it if you need it, as long as you enjoy your rides.

In Northern CA there are some very high level cyclists, and I run into this arrogance all the time. Granted, they are excellent cyclists, so I take the arrogance with a grain of salt. I'm a larger rider, 205 lbs, so climbing without the small ring is agony.

The Compact crank became more popular when prof. started using them on the tour. I tried one - much better, but I still need the smaller ring. I don't feel any shame gearing down one more, in fact I have passed a few of the "machismo" guys in their bigger ring. :)

In Summary, the triple ring offer so many more options for so little weight, I don't understand why everyone doesn't use them. My Flat gears are still large and fast, and my climbing gears are significantly better. Honestly, only the best, most fit guys can outrace me in the 53 ring (while I am in my 52 ring).

There is also a fairly significant difference in the back 9 (or 10) as well - I ride on a 9 gear 12-25 on back, and three ring 52/39/30 on front. Once you're past the double/triple update, bring up the rear cassete, stating you only ride 11-21 (or an 11-23 if you're on a 10), cause you're just that tough. :)

Brodirt
08-21-2009, 07:37 PM
In Northern CA there are some very high level cyclists, and I run into this arrogance all the time. Granted, they are excellent cyclists, so I take the arrogance with a grain of salt. I'm a larger rider, 205 lbs, so climbing without the small ring is agony.

The Compact crank became more popular when prof. started using them on the tour. I tried one - much better, but I still need the smaller ring. I don't feel any shame gearing down one more, in fact I have passed a few of the "machismo" guys in their bigger ring. :)

In Summary, the triple ring offer so many more options for so little weight, I don't understand why everyone doesn't use them. My Flat gears are still large and fast, and my climbing gears are significantly better. Honestly, only the best, most fit guys can outrace me in the 53 ring (while I am in my 52 ring).

There is also a fairly significant difference in the back 9 (or 10) as well - I ride on a 9 gear 12-25 on back, and three ring 52/39/30 on front. Once you're past the double/triple update, bring up the rear cassete, stating you only ride 11-21 (or an 11-23 if you're on a 10), cause you're just that tough. :)

I race but have given up the 53/39 on my main race bike. I have it on my TT rig and on my old race bike, but on my main race bike I have a 52/36 compact and run a 12-25 on my 58mm carbon rims (for TTs or flatter road events) and a 12-27 on my ultra light climbing wheels. I don't need a triple, and honestly I see it just the opposite as you do...I don't see why anyone needs a triple. With a 34 small ring on a compact and a 12-27 cassette you have a 33.1" granny gear, and with a 30 triple your 27 is 29.2" and your 24 is 32.9". So your effective increase is one extra gear. Thats it, one gear.

I agree with you that for most purposes the weight is irrelevant, but the reliability a closeness of ratios is relevant. Dropping from a 39 to a 30 is a big dump with a higher tolerance, and greater likelihood of failure, than any shift on a double chainring setup. Additionally, the difference in the ratios across the front are very large on a triple, so that if you are moving across the whole front crankset, you are making a huge shift across the back as well. This combination also lends to lesser reliability.

If you are concerned with reliability, as most racers are, and most cyclists are actually, then the double is the better option. If you have to tackle any kind of hills and are neither a pro, nor under 30 and have lesser ego issues and, of course, are concerned with reliability, than a compact is the way to go.

I just spent a few hours this afternoon bike shopping with my 55 year old brother in law. He is reasonably fit and light and is somewhere between a fitness rider and a serious recreational rider, and is operating with a moderate budget. We looked at all the main players in the market and each and every one of them offered their bike with a compact. The salespeople actually told us that almost every manufacturer has moved away from the triple on their popular entry level bikes selling a triple specific model at a higher price.

TimmyBoston
08-21-2009, 10:18 PM
I personally don't see the need for a triple either, for road cyclists anyway. I'm a big rider, well compared to lot of cyclists I see, I'm huge at around 200 lbs. I have a compact which I think it is a great alternative to the triple. My compact has a 50/34. The double has a 53/39. The triple has 50/39/30. It's close enough to the compact that I don't see any advantage, it's more hassle to switch three gears, and the compact will climb just as well, IMO. If it's largest gear was larger, I would see an advantage, but without that, I would definitely go with the compact. Now, that I've gotten into it, I wish I had the double, but on climbs, that compact sure is nice. I rarely use my small gear, if at all, it's only on one hill at the beginning of my ride while I'm still quite stiff. But when I do use it, that hill's a breeze. Though, when do eventually upgrade, it will most likely be a double.

Wendy
08-24-2009, 01:47 PM
Ok stupid question here but here it is. I put SPD pedals on my bike recently and now my husband feels the need to ride my bike not his own. Is it okay for him to be using those pedals without clip on shoes? Is it going to have a negative impact on my pedals? I need a decent reason to tell him to stay the heck off my bike. He took it today on a crappy gravel trail and brought it home nasty. Not a big deal if I had not washed and waxed last night. I prefer to stay on the road and he likes to ride it as if it were a mountain bike. He was able to have 2 flats in one day this weekend on his own bike. Besides I always keep my stuff in great condition and he is just a tad on the opposite side. Today is one of those days I wished I would have went with a womens bike.

Brodirt
08-24-2009, 02:13 PM
Ok stupid question here but here it is. I put SPD pedals on my bike recently and now my husband feels the need to ride my bike not his own. Is it okay for him to be using those pedals without clip on shoes? Is it going to have a negative impact on my pedals? I need a decent reason to tell him to stay the heck off my bike. He took it today on a crappy gravel trail and brought it home nasty. Not a big deal if I had not washed and waxed last night. I prefer to stay on the road and he likes to ride it as if it were a mountain bike. He was able to have 2 flats in one day this weekend on his own bike. Besides I always keep my stuff in great condition and he is just a tad on the opposite side. Today is one of those days I wished I would have went with a womens bike.

It wont hurt your pedals, but it might hurt him. Unless you bought caged pedals with a spd retention system then he has nothing for his feet to grip to while riding. Its just not safe.

airplanedoc
08-24-2009, 02:20 PM
I agree I don't think it will hurt the bike or pedals, but mine are certianly hard on my arches when I ride with regular street shoes and not my bike shoes.

AD

Live2Ride
08-24-2009, 02:23 PM
An aquaintence went to Downiville a few years ago. Took the 17 mile shuttle ride to the top, was 200 yards into his downhill run when a foot came off the pedal, got lodged between the ground and pedal, and snapped his ankle like a twig. 17 miles and one hour by shuttle up the side of a mountain - and the shuttle had left. Bad things can happen when your foot comes off a pedal.

Bro nailed this one: "Its just not safe."

Wendy
08-24-2009, 02:25 PM
That figures. : ) Maybe I will have to go buy that new bike sooner than later
and make it a girly looking one : )

I would never think of riding the bike with those pedals and regular shoes myself but I am a little more concerned about safety.

airplanedoc
08-24-2009, 02:31 PM
I just pedal a few blocks down to a buddy's and back, (too far to walk in a timley fashion, too short to drive) I don't go for a serious ride or anything without my bike shoes.

Mojo88
08-24-2009, 06:58 PM
I went to one of the larger LBS in the area tonight and was talking to one of the techs. I mentioned that I was looking for a new saddle and he offered their free measuring service. I have been to quite a few shops but never had this done. You sit on a series of gel pads to determine where the bones in youur pelvis hit and then you are give the exact measurements. As it turns out I was riding a seat that was too small for me. I bought a new saddle and hopefully this will take care of the problem. The best part was the absolute no pressure sale and the promise, if I don't like the seat they will return it ,no questions asked.

gearguywb
08-25-2009, 03:00 AM
A lot of high end shops, and some online retailers, will offer a saddle try program. Saddle "feel" is so individual specific that there is no true science to what will work for someone.

SRock
08-25-2009, 04:31 AM
I went to one of the larger LBS in the area tonight and was talking to one of the techs. I mentioned that I was looking for a new saddle and he offered their free measuring service. I have been to quite a few shops but never had this done. You sit on a series of gel pads to determine where the bones in youur pelvis hit and then you are give the exact measurements. As it turns out I was riding a seat that was too small for me. I bought a new saddle and hopefully this will take care of the problem. The best part was the absolute no pressure sale and the promise, if I don't like the seat they will return it ,no questions asked.


A lot of high end shops, and some online retailers, will offer a saddle try program. Saddle "feel" is so individual specific that there is no true science to what will work for someone.

Makes me wish I was CONUS. My Nihongo is decent but there are nuances I don't get and English terns they don't get. That and the vast majority of bikes sold in Japan look like this:

Wendy
08-25-2009, 11:37 AM
Any thoughts on a 2009 Kestrel Talon Road Bike? I have heard there was a takeover by FUJI and the quality may not be as good as in the past. I went to price a few bikes today just for giggles and kinda fell in love with this bike.

Live2Ride
08-25-2009, 11:44 AM
Hi Wendy. Did you fall in love after a test ride? The bike has to fit or something will hurt and you won't ride it. Good luck and have fun.

Wendy
08-25-2009, 11:49 AM
Hi Wendy. Did you fall in love after a test ride? The bike has to fit or something will hurt and you won't ride it. Good luck and have fun.

Yes it was a perfect fit but so was the Trek, Specialized, and Cannondale I tried. Naturally I liked the Kestrel best and the price is a bit more than the others.

MajorBurnz
08-25-2009, 12:41 PM
I doubt there will be any major changes in the build quality with Fuji taking over. However, over the last couple of years, there has been a slight quality decrease reported by several of my friends in all levels of bikes. We put it down to the bad economy and the need to shave a few dollars off the build price. Just speculation, BTW.

Most CF frames are made in China anyway. The bikes can be of very high quality. Some of the higher-end CF frames are made in Europe, but I don't know if there's any tangible difference in quality...apart from perception.

A friend of mine who's a very experienced biker just bought two 'generic' CF frames direct from the factory in China (or from a dealer who buys direct, I'm not sure which), and he's very happy with the frames (one road, one TT). He was able to build them up with the components he wanted, so he's very happy.

He's so pleased with these bikes that he retired his custom Seven. :rolleyes:

What I'm trying to get at is that if you're really happy with the bike, buy it.

Wendy
08-25-2009, 02:54 PM
What I'm trying to get at is that if you're really happy with the bike, buy it.

I think I will try to get it as a sympathy after surgery gift from my husband : )

moonshine44
08-25-2009, 03:00 PM
I personally don't see the need for a triple either, for road cyclists anyway. I'm a big rider, well compared to lot of cyclists I see, I'm huge at around 200 lbs.

I'm in that same weight range, and I love my triple. I don't climb well, and having a set of "bail-out" gears when I'm halfway up a 10 mile, 5 or 6% grade and running out of gas is truly a blessing...

The bike I just had replaced on warranty was a 52/42/30 triple with a 12-34 nine speed mountain cassette on the rear that I had put on for climbing...

Brodirt
08-25-2009, 04:30 PM
I think I will try to get it as a sympathy after surgery gift from my husband : )

Women tend to fall for those Kestrels. They have always sold well for a smaller brand and I am not aware of anything glaringly bad, or strikingly good, about them. If they were, in fact, taken over by Fuji then I would stay away.

I took my brother in law out shopping for bikes over the weekend and I will tell you the same thing I told him, and that was confirmed by one of the shops, Giant is dollar for dollar the best bike available. The dealer was a Trek/Giant/Jamis dealer and is very reputable and has been around for at least 30 years so his concurrence seemed honest.

For a rider such as you describe yourself, Wendy, I think that either the Trek 1.2 WSD or the Giant Defy line would be a great place to start. Regardless...comfort and fit are your prime motivation. I will remind you of something that I reminded my brother in law...comfort is primarily physical but (and I think you have experienced this already), it is also psychological. You gotta want to get out and ride that thing...it needs to make you feel fast and powerful and fit. Keep that in mind if you really do prefer the Kestrel.

Brodirt
08-25-2009, 04:33 PM
I'm in that same weight range, and I love my triple. I don't climb well, and having a set of "bail-out" gears when I'm halfway up a 10 mile, 5 or 6% grade and running out of gas is truly a blessing...

The bike I just had replaced on warranty was a 52/42/30 triple with a 12-34 nine speed mountain cassette on the rear that I had put on for climbing...

Dude!!!!!! 10 miles at 5-6% is great and you should never need a 30, regardless of your fitness, or that pie plate your carrying in back. The reason you dump to that 30, and that you have that massive cassette, is because of that completely ridiculous 42 in the middle. If you were riding a 50-34 compact and a 13-27, or maybe 29, you would be very comfortable on that big climb of yours.

Mejnoon
08-25-2009, 06:07 PM
I've been thinking about buying an inexpensive road bike. I need to start doing some roadwork, and I get bored running.

I'm not really sure where to start. Can you guys recommend some good, entry level road bikes? I've thought about watching craigslist for something used...if I do, any particular brands/models I should look for?

Any guidance is much appreciated...

Brodirt
08-25-2009, 06:23 PM
I've been thinking about buying an inexpensive road bike. I need to start doing some roadwork, and I get bored running.

I'm not really sure where to start. Can you guys recommend some good, entry level road bikes? I've thought about watching craigslist for something used...if I do, any particular brands/models I should look for?

Any guidance is much appreciated...

What's your budget?

Mojo88
08-25-2009, 06:39 PM
Tried out my new saddle today and I can say is wow. I have never had a more comfortable ride, after 15 miles no pain or discomfort as was the usual. The fitting at the bike shop really did the trick, the tech really new his stuff. It was well worth the 85.00 for the saddle, if you have a shop that offers this service take advantage of it.

perry
08-25-2009, 06:41 PM
So I tried out the clipless pedals tonight. The bike shop manager just so happens to wear my size shoe and had a pair he was trying to sell, so he let me use those. And he had a pair of Crankbrothers Candy SL pedals.

I fell within the first five minutes. It was just in the alley behind the shop practicing clipping and unclipping. I leaned over and was still clipped in. Woops. I landed in the grass so it wasn't bad.

Rode 5 miles up the MUP and we decided to turn back because the trail closes at dusk and we had gotten a late start. I fell again when I turned. Again, didn't unclip and toppled over. This one skinned my arm in a small area and my elbow is a touch sore now.

BUT! Pedaling was MUCH more efficient! I was able to go faster with less effort. It was great! Why didn't someone tell me to try this earlier :rolleyes::redface:

The shoes turned out to be a little loose because I could feel my foot lifting against the top of the shoe on the up stroke. We went back to the shop and he let me try on a few different shoes. Some felt loose, some felt tight. The ones that felt just right was the Pearl Izumi X-Alp Seek. It looks like a running shoe, but with a mountain bike sole. Don't know if the more cycling specific shoes just felt odd because I'm not used to them or what, but I'll go with the ones that felt the best.

Wendy
08-25-2009, 07:36 PM
Women tend to fall for those Kestrels. They have always sold well for a smaller brand and I am not aware of anything glaringly bad, or strikingly good, about them. If they were, in fact, taken over by Fuji then I would stay away.

I took my brother in law out shopping for bikes over the weekend and I will tell you the same thing I told him, and that was confirmed by one of the shops, Giant is dollar for dollar the best bike available. The dealer was a Trek/Giant/Jamis dealer and is very reputable and has been around for at least 30 years so his concurrence seemed honest.

For a rider such as you describe yourself, Wendy, I think that either the Trek 1.2 WSD or the Giant Defy line would be a great place to start. Regardless...comfort and fit are your prime motivation. I will remind you of something that I reminded my brother in law...comfort is primarily physical but (and I think you have experienced this already), it is also psychological. You gotta want to get out and ride that thing...it needs to make you feel fast and powerful and fit. Keep that in mind if you really do prefer the Kestrel.

Thanks for the info. I actually liked the Trek very well also and it was $700 less than the Kestrel. I looked at the WSD 1.2, 1.5 and 2.1 they advised against the 2.1. The gentlemen helping me stated it was not enough of an upgrade for the money. He did feel if I was comfortable with the difference in price that the 1.5 was well worth the additional $200 over the cost of the 1.2 Do you agree?

I also went to another dealer who steered me towards the Specialized. They carry Giant, Specialized and that expensive stuff you ride : ) I gave the
Dolce Comp Compact a spin and it also felt pretty good. It seemed comparable to the Trek WSD 2.1

I know you guys here have nothing to gain by what I purchase and I really appreciate all the help. The shop talked most highly of the Kestrel because of the components being ULTEGRA whatever that means to me, and the bike itself being carbon verses aluminum. Thoughts?

BTW I will look at the Giants too.

Wendy
08-25-2009, 08:02 PM
I fell within the first five minutes. It was just in the alley behind the shop practicing clipping and unclipping. I leaned over and was still clipped in. Woops. I landed in the grass so it wasn't bad.

Rode 5 miles up the MUP and we decided to turn back because the trail closes at dusk and we had gotten a late start. I fell again when I turned. Again, didn't unclip and toppled over. :rolleyes::redface:



I crashed the day before I put pedals on and was a bit scared to ride when I put them on. I never fell with them on until I started to feel comfortable. I put the baby seat on the back this weekend and strapped my 1 yr old in. I stopped at the bottom of a hill to see what the heck my husband and other daughter were doing. I took my left foot out as I do when I ride solo and need to come to a stop. The weight of my daughter in the seat in the back of my bike leaned right so we know what happened next. Boy did I feel stupid there was a huge group of people starring at me. Needless to say that will not happen again. :blushing:

TimmyBoston
08-25-2009, 08:07 PM
Thanks for the info. I actually liked the Trek very well also and it was $700 less than the Kestrel. I looked at the WSD 1.2, 1.5 and 2.1 they advised against the 2.1. The gentlemen helping me stated it was not enough of an upgrade for the money. He did feel if I was comfortable with the difference in price that the 1.5 was well worth the additional $200 over the cost of the 1.2 Do you agree?
.

Wendy I purchased a Trek 1.5 this summer. I was looking at the 1.2 and the 1.5 and IMO there is a tremendous difference between the two. The 1.5 is much, much more comfortable. I highly recommend going with the 1.5 over the 1.2. It is well worth the difference.

moonshine44
08-25-2009, 10:15 PM
Dude!!!!!! 10 miles at 5-6% is great and you should never need a 30, regardless of your fitness, or that pie plate your carrying in back. The reason you dump to that 30, and that you have that massive cassette, is because of that completely ridiculous 42 in the middle. If you were riding a 50-34 compact and a 13-27, or maybe 29, you would be very comfortable on that big climb of yours.

I no longer have the "pie plate" in the back. That bike went back to Specialized with a hairline crack down near the BB shell. They replaced the whole bike with a 2010 full carbon with a 11-27 rear. So far since I've been riding it I've been able to climb some hills in the big ring that I was lucky to get up in the middle ring on my old bike. Of course the 1000 miles I put in on the trainer this winter and spring probably helped with that...

gearguywb
08-26-2009, 03:48 AM
The positive about the big bike brands (Specialized and Trek) is that you tend to get considerably higher components for your purchase dollars. They buy in such mass quantity that you could never build a bike for their sales price.

I am more of a Specialized guy than Trek but either will do a great job for you. See if you can take the final two candidates out for an hour or so each and preferably ride the same route. It is a big difference spending some real time in the saddle vs. the short "parking lot" ride most dealers have you do.